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Apparitions


The Lookout Inn, Lawe Top

The Lookout Inn stands opposite the partially reconstructed Arbeia Roman Fort which dates from around 120AD and served as a maritime supply base for the garrisons on Hadrian’s Wall. We probably should not be surprised to hear of a Roman ghost haunting The Lookout Inn. Read More »

The Lord Eldon, Knutsford

The 300 year old Lord Eldon public house is thought to be haunted by the ghost of Annie Sarah Pollitt, daughter of James Pollitt the landlord of the Lord Eldon in the late 19th century.  She was also, in 1864 crowned the first May Queen of Knutsford’s famous Royal May Day fair. Read More »

The Malt Shovel, Dudley

The Malt Shovel is situated in one of the most haunted areas of Dudley. One of the ghosts here is called the Blue Boy and is only seen in the upstairs windows of the pub usually as an indistinct, misty form.

Another of the apparitions is a small person who walks in accompanied by a black dog. When staff go to look where they have gone they are nowhere to be seen. Read More »

The Manor Castle, Sheffield

This pub sits in the grounds of the now ruined Manor Castle (or Manor Lodge) in Sheffield and is haunted by the apparition of a figure. When encountered by Jack Wright, the new Landlord he moved his family straight back out after three weeks of being continuously haunted, if not by seeing the figure then by feeling a presence. Read More »

The Marine, South Shields

On Thursday 14 June 2012, the following story by Mike Howell entitled ‘High spirits at South Shields pub’ was published in the Shields Gazette. ’THE Marine is no ordinary pub. Read More »

The Miners Arms, Gornal

The Miners Arms has played host to a few strange experiences. A figure has been seen a few times in the pub who simply disappears when he is spotted. He has been known to approach the bar as if to order a drink and then simply vanish. Read More »

The Noahs Ark, Tipton

The Noahs Ark was once run by an ex professional boxer, Tom Cartwright, who stood no nonsense from anyone.

Tom was rudely awoken one night by a figure he took to be an intruder. Naturally he brought his boxing skills to bear and attempted to floor the man standing by his bed. As his fists passed straight through the young man, he vanished into thin air. Read More »

The Nun of Covent Garden

Covent Garden (or Convent Garden) was a 40 acre area owned by the Abbey of Westminster that was used as a market garden in the Middle Ages. It was managed through the issuing of leases by the Abbot of Westminster until the Dissolution of the Monasteries by King Henry VII between 1536 and 1541, when it was taken by the state and eventually passed into the private ownership of the Earl of Bedford. Read More »

The Old Cat, Wordsley

The Old Cat is certainly old and was originally converted from a row of cottages which would have been around at the time of the English Civil War. Cavalier figures from the war have been seen in other parts of Wordsley and it is indeed a Royalist soldier in full attire who has startled staff mainly around the cellar area. Read More »

The Old Hop Pole, West Bromwich

The Old Hop Pole has a little snug which for some reason seems to be the focus of paranormal activity. A little boy and girl in Victorian clothes have been seen here and icy chills can be experienced even when the rest of the pub is warm. Read More »

The Old Queen’s Head, Islington

The Old Queens Head

The Old Queen’s Head Public House (44 Essex Road) is a well known live music venue attracting world class bands and DJ’s, but this building that dates back to the early 19th century has a unique history and a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Old Rectory (Friary Court, Old Friary), Southfleet

Since the 1950s, the 14th century Grade II listed, Old Rectory on Hook Green Road has been divided into two residences, Friary Court and the Old Friary. The rectory, which had a reputation for being haunted in the 19th century, was probably built by Thomas de Alkham (Died 1356), rector of Southfleet from 1323 and the chancellor of Rochester Diocese from 1327. Read More »

The Old Rectory, Cheam

The Grade II listed Old Rectory on Malden Road in Cheam, dates from the early 16th Century and according to their website it is said to be haunted by around seven ‘shy’ ghosts. Read More »

The Old Stags Head, Wolverhampton

The Old Stags Head has a haunting associated with nearby St Bart's Church. The story goes that one of the vicars knew the location of a tunnel leading to the pub cellar and would use it to enjoy regular pints of beer. His less than amused wife would follow him into the cellar and turn off the beer taps. Read More »

The Owain Glyndwr Hotel, Corwen

Owain Glyndwr

Named after Owain Glyndwr the great Welsh hero who had strong connections with Corwen, this is probably one of the oldest hotel buildings in Wales dating back to 1329. The building was originally a monastery attached to the church behind and later a coaching inn. Read More »

The Palace, Kirkgate

Originally a merchants house built in 1741, The Palace had become a registered Inn by 1841, possibly due to the Beerhouse Act of 1830 which enticed private residences to be become public houses. Read More »

The Plough@Eathorpe

The Plough Inn (now The Plough@Eathorpe) is an 18th century coaching house situated on the Fosse Way, the Roman road that linked Exeter with Lincoln. There are stories associated with the pub being haunted. The outline of a figure is said to have been reported walking across the bar area and one member of staff is thought to have been poked in the shoulder whilst mopping the floor.

The Promenade Ghosts

Aberystwyth Promenade

In the 1960′s a young couple tragically drowned after becoming trapped by the high tide and rocks at the end of the promenade at the foot of Constitution Hill in Aberystwyth. The following account is from Phil Bishop and his wife who saw what might have been the ghosts of this couple whilst they were holidaying in Aberystwyth during 1971. Read More »

The Rake Inn, Littleborough

The old Grade II listed coaching house which has been known as The Rake Inn, Hayrake and now The Rake Mediterranean Tapas Restaurant, dates from the very late 17th century and has been a public house since at least 1734, when Abraham Whitehead was the landlord. Read More »

The Red Lion, Wombourne

The ghost of a mysterious lady has haunted The Red Lion for many years. When Frank and Lil Ward moved to the pub in 1963 they were told she was a previous landlady who had died falling down the cellar steps but this is debatable. Read More »

The Result Of A Curse

The following account of an apparition being witnessed outside an unnamed West End church appeared in The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain (1897) by John Ingram. Read More »

The Roebuck, Richmond

Dating from around 1730, The Roebuck public house can be found at 130 Richmond Hill, Richmond and is well known for the amazing views it provides of the River Thames below. In 1972 it was reputedly the scene of a haunting type experience. Guy Lyon Playfair gave the following account of the case in ‘The Haunted Pub Guide’. Read More »

The Rose & Crown, Hemel Hempstead

The Rose & Crown, Hemel Hempstead

The Rose and Crown in Hemel Hempstead was originally a butchers shop. In 1537 the owner is recorded as brewing mead for his workers. The ale business grew until it took over and the oldest ale house in the Old High Street, Hemel Hempstead began. Read More »

The Royal Oak, East Lavant

The 18th century Royal Oak public house and restaurant in East Lavant had a reputation of being haunted in the 1950’s. It has been suggested that the apparition of a bearded man has been seen in the back rooms and heard climbing the stairs during the evening. Read More »

The Royal Standard of England, Beaconsfield

Originally known as The Ship and dating from 1213, The Royal Standard of England on Brindle Lane, Beaconsfield is thought to be the oldest Free House in England and is reputedly haunted by two ghosts. Read More »



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