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Black Dogs


Savernake Forest Hotel

Now converted into a series of private residences, the reputedly haunted, Grade II listed Savernake Forest Hotel was built by George William Frederick Brudenell-Bruce, 2nd Marquess of Ailesbury and Lord Lieutenant of Wiltshire (Born 20 November 1804 – Died 6 January 1878) in 1864. Read More »

Schiehallion

The dark brooding presence of Schiehallion (pronounced She-hal-e-on)- the fairy hill of the Caledonians - looms over the Eastern end of Rannoch moor like a voluminous guardian. The mountain is one of the traditional haunts of otherworld beings. Read More »

Shap A6 Black Dog

A Phantom Black Dog was said to haunt the A6 around Shap Pass, roughly nine miles south of Penrith. In his book Ghosts of the North, Jack Hallam states ‘Many drivers reported seeing, in the beam of their headlights, a big dog loping along for 200 to 300 yards, before disappearing over a stone wall at a place where there is a 300ft sheer drop’. Read More »

Snarly Yow

"Snarly Yow" is the name given to a phantom hound which haunted a section of the National Pike near Turner's Gap (Frederick County). The hound was first mentioned by Madeleine V. Dahlgren in 1882. Her book South Mountain Magic details no less than a dozen sightings of the beast. One account is from a Daniel Mesick, whose father kicked at a huge dog near Dame's Quarter. Read More »

Solebury Mountain

A phantom wolf supposedly haunts this ridge south of New Hope. Information on the wolf is scarce (read non-existent) but I find it interesting that a number of sightings were reported in the last few years of the so-called Yardley Yeti, which despite the name was a dog-like creature, from the region around New Hope.

The Black Dog of Kildonan

In his 'Memorabilia domestica; or, Parish life in the North of Scotland', Donald Sage (born 1789 – died 1869) described a treasure legend in the parish of Kildonan with a phantom Black Dog guardian attached to it. Read More »

The Black Dog, Little Eaton

Little Eaton in Derbyshire has a black dog legend. It is said that the large black animal was a working, hunting hound owned by the last squire of the village, which howled constantly for three days and nights as its master was dying. When the dog ceased howling, the household staff and the villagers knew that the squire had died. Read More »

The Horror of Gyb Farm edited by Richard Holland

Gyb Farm

Within this book, The Horror of Gyb Farm, Richard Holland has collated and edited the works of a pioneering and yet relatively unknown paranormal researcher, Frederick George Lee (born 1832-1902). Between 1875 and 1894 F.G. Read More »

The Wise Woman Of Littondale

The following legend of 'The Wise Woman Of Littondale' appeared in 'The Table Book' (1827) by William Hone (Born 3 June 1780 – Died 8 November 1842) and partially reprinted in ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888). Read More »

Towneley Hall, Burnley

Although the Towneley family lived here since the 13th century, the present Grade I listed Towneley Hall dates from the 14th and 16th century. No longer a stately home, Towneley Hall houses Burnley's Art Gallery & Museum and perhaps a few ghosts. Read More »

Troller's Gill, Appletreewick

The caves of this deep limestone ravine are the haunt of trolls and sprites. The Gill is also associated with a black dog legend. Read More »

Two Haunted Counties - A Ghost Hunter's Companion to Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire by Tony Broughall & Paul Adams

Two Haunted Counties

As it says on the back cover of the book, a twelfth century Gilbertine priory, a Chrysler car factory, a de-sanctified church and a Georgian period lavatory are just a few of the haunted localities from the case files of 1970s ghost buster Tony Broughall. Read More »

Viborg Black Dog Sighting

Viborg used to be called Wibierga, “Holy Mountains”, because the hills here at the centre of the ancient road and ley line network in the heart of Jutland were sacred since stone age times. Read More »

Whitmore Park Black Dog

According to ‘The Folklore of Warwickshire’ (1976) by Roy Palmer, a Black Dog ‘with a matted, shaggy coat and green eyes roams Whitmore Park at night. People avoid the area, since to see the dog means a death in the family’ It is thought that in 1949 this creature standing about six foot tall was seen on Watery Lane. Read More »



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