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Haunted Pubs


The Old Black Lion, Northampton

This old public house has in the past been reputedly haunted with poltergeist type phenomena, with beer barrels that move. Phantom footsteps have also been heard moving around.

The Old Queen’s Head, Islington

The Old Queens Head

The Old Queen’s Head Public House (44 Essex Road) is a well known live music venue attracting world class bands and DJ’s, but this building that dates back to the early 19th century has a unique history and a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Owain Glyndwr Hotel, Corwen

Owain Glyndwr

Named after Owain Glyndwr the great Welsh hero who had strong connections with Corwen, this is probably one of the oldest hotel buildings in Wales dating back to 1329. The building was originally a monastery attached to the church behind and later a coaching inn. Read More »

The Palace, Kirkgate

Originally a merchants house built in 1741, The Palace had become a registered Inn by 1841, possibly due to the Beerhouse Act of 1830 which enticed private residences to be become public houses. Read More »

The Plough, Ormskirk

The following article by Jamie Bowman entitled 'Car crash awakens The Plough pub’s ghost according to landlady' was published in the Ormskirk Advertiser on 19 July 2012. Read More »

The Plough@Eathorpe

The Plough Inn (now The Plough@Eathorpe) is an 18th century coaching house situated on the Fosse Way, the Roman road that linked Exeter with Lincoln. There are stories associated with the pub being haunted. The outline of a figure is said to have been reported walking across the bar area and one member of staff is thought to have been poked in the shoulder whilst mopping the floor.

The Roebuck, Richmond

Dating from around 1730, The Roebuck public house can be found at 130 Richmond Hill, Richmond and is well known for the amazing views it provides of the River Thames below. In 1972 it was reputedly the scene of a haunting type experience. Guy Lyon Playfair gave the following account of the case in ‘The Haunted Pub Guide’. Read More »

The Rose & Crown, Hemel Hempstead

The Rose & Crown, Hemel Hempstead

The Rose and Crown in Hemel Hempstead was originally a butchers shop. In 1537 the owner is recorded as brewing mead for his workers. The ale business grew until it took over and the oldest ale house in the Old High Street, Hemel Hempstead began. Read More »

The Royal Oak, East Lavant

The 18th century Royal Oak public house and restaurant in East Lavant had a reputation of being haunted in the 1950’s. It has been suggested that the apparition of a bearded man has been seen in the back rooms and heard climbing the stairs during the evening. Read More »

The Royal Oak, St Neots

The Royal Oak no longer occupies 38 High Street in St Neots, but in 1963, Mr Hart the Landlord reported a strange and nasty smell that was considered to be paranormal in nature. Earlier in the in 20th century an exorcism was carried out in the building but the reason for it is unknown, though it can be assumed that the haunting went back many years.

The Royal Standard of England, Beaconsfield

Originally known as The Ship and dating from 1213, The Royal Standard of England on Brindle Lane, Beaconsfield is thought to be the oldest Free House in England and is reputedly haunted by two ghosts. Read More »

The Royal Victoria & Bull Hotel, Dartford

The Royal Victoria & Bull Hotel on High Street in Dartford is Grade II Listed and dates from 1703.  Originally it was a large coaching inn on the London to Canterbury and Dover road. Read More »

The Salamander, Bath

Referred to locally as ‘The Sally’, The Salamander can be found at 3 John Street, Bath, a Grade II listed building dating back to 1736. Haunt like experiences have been reported here during this century at least, including unexplained footsteps and unaccounted for singing and talking being heard. Read More »

The Saracens Head Inn, Amersham

Two ghosts are thought to haunt this old 16th century coaching inn said to have been built from timbers taken from old ships. One of the ghosts is reputedly a serving wench dating from the 17th century and the second ghost, according to their website is a mystery.

The Ship Inn, Oundle

The Ship Inn is a 14th century coaching house in picturesque Oundle. It supposed to be haunted by the ghost of a former landlord who committed suicide by jumping out of an upper story bedroom window, breaking his neck. His ghost has been encountered by several subsequent licensees and visitors to the Ship Inn alike.

The Skirrid ‘Mountain’ Inn

The village of Llanfihangel Crucorney, just off the A465 to the north of Abergavenny, might possess the oldest and most ‘haunted’ inn in the principality of Wales. At one point, the inn doubled as a courtroom and the earliest record for the Skirrid Mountain Inn is said to date back to 1110AD when a man named John Crowther was awarded the death sentence for stealing sheep. Read More »

The Spaniards Inn

Dating from 1585 the Spaniards Inn on Spaniards Road is a listed building and was built to accompany a tollhouse on the boundary of the Bishop of London’s estate. It is said the father of famous highwayman Richard (Dick) Turpin (1705 – 7 April 1739) was landlord of The Spaniards Inn and that Dick spent much time here, probably watching the road for potential coaches to rob. Read More »

The Sun Inn, Chipping

The 18th century Sun Inn is said to be haunted by the apparition of Lizzie Dean, a scullery maid that ended her own life in the attic of the pub on the day her lover married her best friend. Read More »

The Thomas a Beckett Public House

The Thomas a Beckett Public House at 320 Old Kent Road is no longer open for business (now the Nolias Art Gallery) but the building still remains and it ihas  a rare and rich heritage, even without the ghosts.  Old Kent Road partially follows the route of what was Watling Street (the Roman road).  The pub got its name due to it being so close to what was St Thomas-a-W Read More »

The Three Crutches, Strood

One night in the 13th century a Templar Knight named Sir Richard or Reginald Braybrooke was murdered whilst travelling (probably) to Temple Manor after visiting Lord Cobham. He was shot through the heart by and arrow and his body was not discovered until the following day at a location where three roads met. The murderer was never caught or brought to justice. Read More »

The Three Mariners Inn, Scarborough

The Three Mariners

The Three Mariners Inn - which is now a museum dedicated to the history of smuggling in the area - dates back to the 1300s and, is the earliest licensed premises in Scarborough.

It is said to be haunted by a headless woman, who warns fishermen of impending disaster. Read More »

The Toby Carvery, Cleadon

Formerly known as The Britannia, this old coaching inn dates from the 17th century and has a reputation for being haunted. Read More »

The Town Of Ramsgate, Wapping

The Town Of Ramsgate public house is a Grade II listed building dating from the 17th century. Press Gangs were said to recruit drunks and imprison them in the cellars of pub, prior to them taking up their new career in the Navy. Read More »

The Volunteer, Baker Street

The Volunteer public house on Baker Street (so named as it recruiting up station during the war) is reputedly built upon the site of a large 17th Century house that was once owned by the Neville family. This building burnt down in 1654 and the Nevilles were lost in the flames. However, Rupert Neville is said to haunt the pubs cellars. Read More »

The WestGate, Bath

The following paragraph from the pubs in Bath website refers to it being haunted. 'Situated in the bustling centre not 100 metres from the famous baths, the WestGate is a lively meeting place with a twist on the traditional pub. Read More »



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