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Haunted Pubs


The Crown Inn, Amersham

The reputedly haunted Grade II listed Crown was originally an old coaching inn dating back to the 16th century or 17th century* and now forms part of the Dhillon Group's family of modern coaching inns. Read More »

The Crown, Sedgley

A previous landlord, known as Bob, allegedly haunts The Crown. He died in the cellar from a heart attack many years ago. Dogs are prone to behaving strangely when Bob is about and on one occasion a previous landlord found himself locked in his own bedroom even though he was on his own. Read More »

The Crystal Palace, Bath

Crystal Palace

The Crystal Palace on Abbey Green in Bath is so called in commemoration of The Grand Exhibition which took place in Hyde Park, London between 1 May 1851 and 15 October 1851. Prior to this name change, the Inn was known as The Three Tuns. Read More »

The Duck, Aylesbury (Demolished)

The Duck public house closed in 2009 and was demolished the following year, so we will probably learn nothing anything new from this reputedly haunted building. Luckily the following article entitled 'Ghostly goings-on puzzle pub couple ' was published in the Bucks Herald on 18 February 2004. Read More »

The Duckworth Hall, Oswaldtwistle

John Fahey gave the following account of the haunting at The Duckworth Hall in his 30 October 2003 article entitled 'Spooky tales of a haunted Hyndburn' which was was published in the Accrington Observer. Read More »

The Dun Cow, Olney

Possibly having been located at 2 Yardley Road, the Dun Cow inn is now long gone. In his almanac ‘Olney, Bucks’ (1907), Oliver Ratcliff gives the following story about the pub. ‘The old Dun Cow Inn, which stood on the Yardley Road, was also reported to be haunted. Read More »

The Dun Cow, Shrewsbury

This Inn was built by Roger de Montgomery in around 1085, making it one of the oldest in Britain. Reputedly haunted by a monk. Read More »

The Eclipse Inn, Winchester

The Eclipse Inn dates from 1540 and over the past centuries the building has had many uses including a rectory, private residence, ale house (around 1750) and from the nineteenth century an Inn. Read More »

The Elephant & Castle, Amersham

Probably dating from the 17th century, The Elephant & Castle is another of Amershams reputedly haunted inns. In 2001 the following interview by Victoria Birch concerning the haunting appeared in the The Argus. Read More »

The Feathers Hotel

The Feathers

The Feathers Hotel is a beautiful seventeenth century building with a carved timber façade and a reputation of being haunted. It was originally built for an attorney called Rees Jones in 1619 and the Feathers name relates to the Ostrich Feathers that are part of the design in the exterior wooden façade. Read More »

The Flask Tavern

The Flask Tavern dates back to the 17th century and has served the likes of Karl Marx (born 5 May 1818 – died 14 March 1883), William Hogarth (born 10 November 1697 – died 26 October 1764) (painter) and Dick Turpin (born 1705 – died 7 April 1739) (highwayman) who is said to have been hidden there for a while. Read More »

The Garricks Head, Bath

The Garrick’s Head at 7-8 St. Johns Place, Bath can be found adjacent to the Theatre Royal and is Grade II listed. Read More »

The Gatehouse, Highgate

The Gatehouse

There were three main entrances each with a tollhouse leading into the Bishop of London’s Park of Haringeye and The Gatehouse was the tavern at the Highgate entrance. (The Spaniards Inn ,Newgate and East Finchley being the others). Read More »

The George and Pilgrim Hotel, Glastonbury

Known as the George before the 20th century, The George and Pilgrim dates from the 1430's* and was originally owned by the Abbots of Glastonbury Abbey until its dissolution in September 1539. Read More »

The George Inn, Bathampton

The Grade II listed George Inn on Mill Lane in Bathampton dates from the mid late 17th century and is thought to be haunted by Viscount John Baptiste Du Barry who was killed on Bathampton Down on18 November 1778 during the last legal duel in Britain. His mortally wounded body is said to have been brought into The George Inn where he finally died. Read More »

The Globe Inn, Dumfries

Established in 1610, The Globe is traditionally haunted by a barmaid called Ann, who had an affair with Robert Burns. Burns made her pregnant and she bore him a child that she named Elizabeth. While Robert Burns was well known for his womanising ways it is not know if there is any truth in the story. Read More »

The Golden Fleece, York

The Golden Fleece is a Grade II listed building which claims to be York's most haunted pub. According to their website 'Possibly the most famous ghost is Geoff Monroe, a Canadian airman who was staying at the pub in room four when he died in 1945, by throwing himself or falling out of one of the windows. Read More »

The Grapes Hotel

Grapes

In the village of Maentwrog on the A496, the Grade II listed Grapes Hotel is the local hostel. It was originally a 17th Century coaching inn but its cellar dates from the 13th Century. Read More »

The Grappa Wine Bar

The Grappa Wine Bar on Lansdown Road, Bath was originally a public house known as the Beehive which in the 1970’s had a reputation for being haunted by a friendly serving maid which the licensees referred to as Bunty. Read More »

The Grenadier, Knightsbridge

The Grenadier at 18 Wilton Row dates back to the early eighteenth century. Popular with Royalty and celebrities (King George IV, Madonna, Guy Ritchie and Gwyneth Paltrow) it was described by Guy Lyon Playfair in his Haunted Pub Guide (1987) as being “probably the most famous haunted pub in the world” and it is probably the one with its own sentry box outside. Read More »

The Greyhound and Punchbowl, Bilston

The Greyhound and Punchbowl is an ancient pub which has the unusual feature of a tree trunk in the middle of the pub. A number of figures have been sighted here. A tall man in a black cloak and large black hat has been seen around the kitchen area. When staff go to investigate further of course there is no one there. Read More »

The Hanbury Arms, Pontypool

The following two newspaper reports concerning strange experiences at The Hanbury Arms, Clarence Street, Pontypool were printed on 4 September 2012. The first, entitled ‘Ghostly goings on at Pontypool pub’ is by Natalie Crockett and appeared in the Gwent News. Read More »

The Hog's Head, Wolverhampton

Hogs Head

The Hog's Head used to be known as The Vine. As far as is known there are two ghosts here. One is a train driver called Marber who was killed in the bombing during World War Two. He is apt to sit quietly at the bar before simply disappearing. Read More »

The Horns of Boningale

The Horns of Boningale boasts a number of ghostly presences within its walls. At one time Shropshire sheep drovers would stay in a bunkhouse at the inn which has now become the dining room. The story goes that a fight between two of the drovers resulted in the death of one of them. Since then, the apparition of a man dressed in a smock has been seen at times in the dining room. Read More »

The Horns, Crucifix Lane

Suchards Bar & Thai Restaurant can now be found at 2 Crucifix Lane. Before Suchards it was known the Czar Bar and before that The Horns public house. The Horns dates back to the Victorian era and appears in the 1869 Post Office Directory, but it was in the mid 1960’s that it got a reputation of being haunted. Read More »



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