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Poltergiests


50 Berkeley Square

50 Berkeley Square

During the Victorian era 50 Berkeley Square was popularly believed to be the most haunted building in London. Now occupied by the famous antiquarian book dealers, Maggs Bros, there is no evidence that haunting like experiences persist but the case of the haunting of 50 Berkeley Square, which has probably developed into a kind of urban legend has become infamous. Read More »

9 Earl Street, Westminster (1825)

In his book ‘Poltergeist Over England: Three Centuries of Mischievous Ghosts’, Harry Price refers to a case at 9 Earl Street, Westminster where the ringing of the bells in the house was ‘so loud and persistent that it sent one of the maidservants into convulsions!’  But was this a poltergeist? Read More »

Arnos Manor Hotel, Bristol

Built as a home in 1760 by local merchant William Reeve, the seventy three bed-roomed Arnos Manor Hotel has a reputation of being haunted. The Arnos Manor has its own Chapel in which Nuns would ran a girls school. One of the reported ghost stories involves a nun who is suspected to have fallen pregnant. She reputedly committed suicide and was bricked up in a wall. Read More »

Bagdale Hall

Bagdale Hall

The hall is the oldest building in Whitby built in 1516. It is now a hotel said to be haunted by Browne Bushell, a former owner who was executed for piracy. He has been seen walking up the staircase, and has also been heard in the same place.

There has been other strange phenomena associated with the hall over the years, including poltergeist activity.

Balornock Poltergeist (1974 – 1975)

The following article entitled ‘Noises in the night-and the suspect is a spirit’ was published in the Glasgow Herald on 17 January 1975.

Banging noises, terrified families……it’s all being blamed on a mischievous ghost. JOHN McKINLAY reports on the chaos in a Glasgow housing scheme which started with a weird tapping noise. Read More »

Barmouth Poltergeist

The following account of a poltergeist in Barmouth appeared in an edition of Folk-lore (June 1892) and was also reproduced in Richard Holland's 'Haunted Wales: A Guide to Welsh Ghostlore' Read More »

Best Western The Vine Hotel, Skegness

The Lincolnshire coast was once a major focus of smuggling in Britain. Read More »

Bingen Poltergeist

Situated at the junction of the Rhine and Nahe rivers, Bingen is a city that is connected to a very old poltergeist story. The report appears in the Annales Fuldenses which were written in the Abbey of Fulda, Franconia during the ninth century, covering the rule of the Carolingian line from Louis the Pious (778–840) to Louis III, ending in 1901. Read More »

Bwgan Pant-y-Wennol

In his excellent book 'Haunted Wales: A Guide to Welsh Ghostlore', Richard Holland quotes the following article concerning a poltergeist at Pant-y-Wennol near Abersoch that appeared in the Caernarvon & Denbigh Herald, 29 May 1866. Read More »

Castle Wildenstein

Castle Wildenstien

Castle Wildenstein (Schloss Wildenstein) dates from the around the 16th century and has acquired a reputation for being haunted. According to John and Anne Spencer in The 'Encyclopedia of Ghosts and Spirits', on 1st March 1953, Baroness von Lobenstein reported seeing an apparition of a young boy in a sailor suit stood in the kitchen. Read More »

Chance To Be Part Of Project Albion

ASSAP (The Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) in partnership with Mysterious Britain & Ireland is opening up its long running Project Albion to enable members of the public to directly contribute towards it. Read More »

Cross Keys Hotel, Peebles

This Coaching Inn dating from 1693 is located in the centre of Peebles and is probably the town's oldest building. Bedroom 5 is said to be haunted by the ghost of a woman called Marion Ritchie who was the first Landlady of the Cross Keys and this is where she reputedly died. Read More »

Curfew Inn, Bath

The Curfew Inn at 11 Cleveland Place, Bath dates from around the 1820’s.  It was designed by Henry Edmund Goodridge (Born 1797 – Died 26 October 1864) who’s other work include the Grade II listed Cleveland Bridge in Bath and the folly now known as Beckford's Tower though originally named Lansdown Tower.   Read More »

Cursed Bone of Learmonth Gardens

Zeyla Hay Seton in Egypt

The home of Sir Alexander Hay Seton, 10th Baronet Seton (born 14 August 1904 – died 1963) became the focus of the world media after poltergeist like activity possibly linked to a bone taken from an Egyptian skeleton led to speculation that the Baronet’s family were cursed by a mummy. Read More »

Dagg Poltergeist

The case of the Dagg Poltergeist took place in the Ottawa Valley during the end of 1889 and centered around the farm and family of George Dagg. Read More »

Drummer of Tidworth

Generally regarded by some as a hoax, the case of the Tidworth (previously known as Tedworth) Drummer was published by the philosopher and writer Rev Joseph Glanvill (Born 1636 – Died 1680)and concerned the haunting of John Mompesson of Zouch Manor House (no longer standing), cousin of the Member of Parliament Thomas Mompesson (Born 1630 – Died 1701). Read More »

Drummer of Tidworth

Generally regarded by some as a hoax, the case of the Tidworth (previously known as Tedworth) Drummer was published by the philosopher and writer Rev Joseph Glanvill (Born 1636 – Died 1680)and concerned the haunting of John Mompesson of Zouch Manor House (no longer standing), cousin of the Member of Parliament Thomas Mompesson (Born 1630 – Died 1701). Read More »

Eland Road Poltergeist

During December 1927 the family home of Mr Henry Robinson in Eland Road, Battersea came to the attention of the Police and the local media following reports of suspected Poltergeist like activity. On 19th January 1928 Harry Price, president of the Ghost Club started to investigate the case. Read More »

Enfield Poltergeist

'What IS the truth about the Enfield Poltergeist? Amazing story of 11-year-old London girl who 'levitated' above her bed' is the title given to the following article by Zoe Brennan which appeared on the Mail Online 28th October 2011. Read More »

Epworth Old Rectory

Epworth Rectory has a lot of historical interest, being the childhood home of John Wesley, the founder of Methodism. His father, the Revd. Samuel Wesley, arrived at the rectory with his wife Susanna in 1696. Thirteen years later, the original house was destroyed by fire. Read More »

Ffrith Farm Ghost

The following piece of Ghost lore, which describes poltergeist like activity was given to Elias Owen by a schoolmaster, Mr. Read More »

Gef, The Talking Mongoose

It was in September 1931 that the Irving family of Doarlish Cashen, on the Isle of Man, came to prominence by reputedly being 'haunted' by a talking mongoose. Gef, as the animal preferred to be called, attracted wide media interest - even being investigated by Harry Price and Nandor Fodor. But what was Gef? Read More »

Ghost Finder London - App

Ghost Finder London - Logo

Looking for the spookier side to London? Then this is the must-have app for you...

London has a rich haunted heritage, and from well-known ghosts to some of the more obscure, this app features over 300 haunted locations around the city, the map uses your phone's GPS to bring the spooks to you! Read More »

Ghost Taverns Of The North East by Darren W Ritson and Michael J Hallowell

Ghost Taverns Of The North East

Well, anyone that knows me knows that pubs and ghosts are two of my favourite things so luckily this book on Ghost Taverns of the North East handily combines the two. Read More »

Ghosts of Neath by Robert King

Ghosts of Neath by Robert King

The history of Neath and the surrounding area dates back to Roman times, so it is little wonder that this small Welsh town is teaming with all manner of ghosts, from the long dead monks that still wander among the ruins of Neath Abbey to the voices of ghostly miners to be found deep in the mountains. Read More »



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