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Legends


Ben Bulben

Ben Bulben

Legendary home of the Irish third century warriors known as the Fianna, Ben Bulben (or Benbulben, Benbulbin, Binn Ghulbain) is a large glacial rock formation in the Darty Mountains. Read More »

Bhangarh

The ruins of Bhangarh fort and city are in Alwar district, Rajasthan, India and is roughly 80kms from Alwar City. It has been called the most haunted place in India and  staying in the ruins after dark is strictly prohibited by the government. Read More »

Birdoswald Roman Fort

Birdoswald Roman Fort

This impressive site is the remains of a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall. The area was occupied from much earlier times and recently a Neolithic burial has been found. There is also evidence of a large Dark Age Hall on the site. Traditionally the site has been identified with Camlan, the site of King Arthur's last battle. Read More »

Black Calf Of Narberth

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) tells us of what may have been the ghost of an animal or as those in the North of England may refer to as a hairy ghost. However, this one, according to Sykes may have been something more sinister. Read More »

The Legend of Bladud

Bladud was the legendary founder of Bath and the sacred temple of Aqua Sullis. He is mentioned in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain and The Life of Merlin, written in the twelfth century. The source of the original legend is obscure. Read More »

Bleeding Heart Yard and Lady Elizabeth Hatton

There is a Devil legend associated with Bleeding Heart Yard that ends in the horrific death of Lady Elizabeth Hatton. The scene of the legend is a grand ball at Hatton House on 26 January 1626 (though sometimes shown as 1662). Lady Hatton attracted a lot of attention as she danced throughout the night being both a young beauty and very wealthy. Read More »

Blencathra Mountain (The Saddleback)

Blencathra Mountain (Saddleback)

This mountain is one of the locations associated with an army of sleeping knights, this time King Arthur and his men, waiting for the call to arms when he is most needed. In old Cumbrian, Blencathra means 'Devils Peak'

Directions: A footpath leads to the hill from Blencathra Centre. Read More »

Blue Ben of Kilve

A dragon called Blue Ben resided here and was supposedly the steed of the devil. He fell from a causeway of rocks and drowned in the mud. His skull (actually a fossil Ichthyosaur) was uncovered and is on display in the local museum.

The above was taken from an article by Richard Freeman.

Blue Stane, St Andrews

The Blue Stane (stone) now largely ignored, was once a Celtic place of power in the landscape around St Andrews. Read More »

Bodewryd Standing Stone (a.k.a. Carreglefn, Maen Pres)

The Bodewryd standing stone is approximately between eleven and twelve feet tall, and stands alone in a field on the Plas Bodewryd Estate. It is also known as Carreglefn (Smooth Stone), and as Maen Pres (Brass Stone). Read More »

Bolster and St Agnes

Bolster's Stride

In the time of giants in the Penwith area of Cornwall, there lived a particularly troublesome giant called Bolster, who was of such enormous stature that he could stand with one foot on Carn Brae, and the other on the beacon near St Agnes, a distance of 6 miles. Read More »

Bosherton Lake

The local lake is said to have been the body of water into which Arthur's sword Excalibur was cast after the battle of Cammlan.

Directions: A footpath from Bosherton leads to the lake Bosherton reached off the B4319 South of Pembroke

The Brahan Seer

Holed stone

The Brahan Seer is undoubtedly the most famous of all Celtic seers although the reality of the 17th Century Coinneach Odhar Fiosaiche or Kenneth Mackenzie is hidden deep in legend. The roots of these legends may have come from a holy man in the 1600’s, about whom legends have grown with the years. Read More »

Brent Knoll

The hill, which was once and Iron Age hillfort, is associated with an Arthurian Legend, and was the abode of three fearsome giants. Read More »

Brent Pelham and Piers Shonks

‘A mighty dragon made its lair under the roots of an ancient yew tree and wrought havoc in the surrounding countryside. Piers Shonks, Lord of the Manor of Pelham, fought it accompanied by three huge hounds. He finally triumphed by thrusting a long spear down the dragon’s throat. Read More »

British Dragon Gazetteer

Long Wyrm

No other country on earth has such rich dragon lore as the British Isles. Our tiny little homeland is crawling with legends of these beasts. If you have ever wondered if there is a dragon legend close to where you live, then take a look at the following list. Read More »

Bryn Myrddin (Merlin's Hill)

The hill is one of many places in Britain reputed to be the prison of Merlin, where Merlin lies asleep in a cave awaiting the call to return and help his fellow countrymen. According to tradition it is possible to hear his groans from under the hill if you listen hard enough. In legend Merlin was born in Carmarthen 2 miles away from the hill. Read More »

Burning of the Bartle, West Witton

Famous for the Burning of the Bartle festival, when an effigy of St Bartholomew is burned in the town. The festival takes place on the nearest Saturday to the 24th of August. Read More »

Burrafirth

Two Norse giants lived on the Isle of Unst, which is the most northerly of the Shetland Islands. One giant was called Herman and his rival was Saxi (Saxa). Read More »

Byard's Leap

Black Meg was a man-eating ogress who lived in a cave on the wild and lonely expanse of Ancaster Heath. She terrorised the countryside for miles around, devouring anyone she came across. Her foul, evil spells made the land barren and she used her long iron claws to maul and kill livestock. Read More »

Cadbury Castle

This large hillfort has a plethora of traditions attached to it, most notably that it is the site of the legendary Camelot, the stronghold of Arthur. There is a distinct possibility that the historical Arthur - probably a sixth century war leader - had his base here, as the Iron Age hillfort was reoccupied and refortified around this time. Read More »

Cader Idris

Cader Idris

This holy mountain has a rock seat called 'The Seat of Prince Idris'. It is said that anyone who spends the night alone on the mountain will either die, become insane or become a poet.

The seat of Prince Idris is also known as the Chair of Idris, and was named after a giant who was said to view the heavens from this lofty point. Read More »

Caerleon Amphitheatre

Arthurs Round Table

This is the best example of a Roman amphitheatre in Britain. Until 1926 when serious excavations were undertaken at the site, it was considered to be a circular earthwork and linked to the legend of King Arthur being known as his Round Table. Read More »

Capel Garmon Church

There have been a series of churches in Capel Garmon, the latest of which is the now closed, this being  St Garmon's Church that was built in 1862. In his 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887) Elias Owen recounts the following legend he heard pertaining to the church in Capel Garmon from his friend Rev. Owen Jones of Pentrevoelas. Read More »

Caractacus Stone

This standing stone has a number of traditions associated with it, it looks very much like a Neolithic standing stone, although sources suggest that it actually dates to the fifth century, during the end of the Roman occupation. The name of the stone is certainly of Roman origin although it may have been old during the Roman period. Read More »



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