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Stevenston’s Legend of the Hidden Gold

After the routing of the Spanish Armada in 1588, many of the Spanish Galleons escaped and tried to find North West passage through the North Sea: around the tip of Scotland and back to Spain. Read More »


Striper Tones

As with many tales regarding in Britain about the Devil, this one also has him carrying an apron full of stones, in this case from Ireland. He sat to rest upon what is now called The Devil's Chair and is the highest rock on this ridge. As usual, the apron strings break and he drops his load of stones. Read More »

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

This thirteenth century fortified manor house is supposedly the hiding place of a treasure chest full of gold, which was hidden by two giants. The legend says the treasure is guarded by a raven which sits atop the chest. The key to the chest was apparently lost when one of the giants dropped it in the moat. Read More »

The Giants of Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle (1)

This legend belongs to the area around Stokesay Castle in Shropshire, and was first recorded in Shropshire Folklore, A Sheaf of Gleanings by Burne and Jackson London 1883. What follows is a short adaptation of the original folklore. Read More »

Strange Mitcham by James Clark

Strange Mitcham

Strange Mitcham by James Clark was first published as a booklet in 2002 as part of ASSAP's (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) Project Albion. It was updated and republished in 2011 giving James the opportunity to add a few more articles and further information. Read More »

Strange Project Albion

Project Albion is part of one of ASSAP’s longest running and most successful research endeavours and it has been likened to a Domesday book of the paranormal. It is an attempt to record the full spectrum of anomalies, past and present, within their geographical, as well as historical, context. Read More »

Stretford Great Stone

By the entrance of Gorse Hill Park from Chester Road is a large boulder known as the Great Stone. This stone gave its name to Great Stone Road (beside which it stood until 1925) and the old Great Stone Farm. There are many stories, legends and theories concerning the origins of the stone. Read More »

Swallow Falls (Rhaeadr Ewynnol)

Found on the A5, to the north west of Betws-y-Coed, this much photographed cascade of water is where the Afon Llugwy drops over ancient worn rocks on its journey eastwards. It is the highest continuous waterfall in Wales and one of the most visited beauty spots in the area due to its accessibility. Read More »

Taliesin the Bard


This is the version translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, and published in 1849 in the collection of old Welsh tales entitled the Mabinogion. Traditionally Taliesin is placed in the time of Arthur, which is generally believed to be in the 6th century AD. Read More »

The Black Dog of Kildonan

In his 'Memorabilia domestica; or, Parish life in the North of Scotland', Donald Sage (born 1789 – died 1869) described a treasure legend in the parish of Kildonan with a phantom Black Dog guardian attached to it. Read More »

The Black Lady of Bradley Woods

Hundreds of years ago there lived a poor woodcutter in Bradley Woods with his pretty young wife and their baby boy. They lived very happily together until the woodcutter was pressed into military service for the local lord.  He was sent to fight in the wars that were then raging in England. Read More »

The Blinded Giant, Dalton

The following tale of a North Yorkshire giant appeared in 'English Fairy and Other Folk Tales' by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890] who cited 'Notes on the Folk-Lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders.' Read More »

The Chalice Well, Glastonbury

Chalice Well

The Chalice Well has been associated with healing and with the Holy Grail for many years. According to legend Joseph of Arimethea placed the cup that held the blood of Christ into the well. The waters run red with Iron Oxide another association with blood. Read More »

The Church of Holy Trinity, Blythburgh

Holy Trinity Church in Blythburgh is a Grade I listed building dating from the 14th century, which is thought to be built on the site of a much early church built in 630AD. It was said to have been visited by Black Shuck in 1577. Read More »

The Devil of Drakelowe

In 'Collections for a history of Staffordshire' (1880) we are introduced to the following account of the events surrounding the case know as The Devil of Drakelowe and the abandonment of the hamlet. The story may have its origins in the Anglo Saxon meaning of Drakelow, 'Dragons Mound' which may indicate a burial site with a guardian spirit. Read More »

The Devil's Apronful

In his  ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ (1888), Rev Thomas Parkinson gave the following account of how the stones known as The Devil's Apronful got their name. Read More »

The Devil's Arrows

The Devil's Arrows are three Neolithic Megaliths - the tallest of which is 23 feet high - standing in a crooked alignment of around 580 feet. The fourth stone was destroyed in the 16th century, when Camden noted that it had been pulled down by treasure seekers.

In legend they were thrown by the Devil from Howe Hill to destroy Aldborough, hence their common name. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge At Lake Galenbeck

Karl Bartsch gave the following Devil bridge story in his 'Tales and legends and traditions of Mecklenburg' (Sagen, Märchen und Gebräuche aus Meklenburg) published in 1879. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Burnsall

There stories throughout Britain of the Devil building bridges and Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' (1888) gives the following account for the bridge over the River Dibb at Burnsall. Read More »

The Devil's Elbow

A curved stretch of road on the B6105 between Glossop and Woodhead is known as the Devils Elbow, it has been the scene of strange events and is associated with a Devil legend. Many place names in this area may have strange origins. Names such as Shining Clough and Lantern Pike suggest places associated with mysterious light phenomena. Read More »

The Devils Bridge

Devils Bridge

There are three bridges over this part of the Mynach Gorge, each one built successively over the others, as they needed to be improved for traffic. The lowest of the bridges dating from the 11th century is the original one and is associated with a Devil legend that is common in Britain with minor variations from place to place. Read More »

The Devil’s Tree, Llanrhos

The following account entitled 'The Devil’s Tree by Eglwys Rhos' appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh Folk-lore' (1887). 'At the corner of the first turning after passing the village of Llanrhos*, on the left hand side, is a withered oak tree, called by the natives of those parts the Devil’s Tree, and it was thought to be haunted, and therefore the young and timid were afraid to pass it Read More »

The Dream of Rhonabwy

Lady Charlotte Guest published the first English translation of The Mabinogion and below is how the tale of The Dream of Rhonabwy appeaed in it [1877]. Read More »

The Dule Upo' Dun

‘A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6’(1911) mentions that ‘On the road from Clitheroe to Waddington, near Brungerley Bridge, once stood an inn known as the 'Dule upo' Dun', from its sign representing the Devil galloping madly along upon a dun horse. Read More »

The Element Encyclopedia of Vampires, An A-Z of the Undead by Theresa Cheung

A-Z Of The Undead

The book is a beautifully thick 685 page tome that promises to examine the dark depths of the vampire world, separating the myth from the chilling reality. Undoubtedly if you were attacked by an undead creature you could probably knock it out by throwing the book at it, but there are much better methods included inside. Read More »



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