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Legends


The Worm Of Sexhow

The Worm of Sexhow, according to ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888): ’Sexhow is a small hamlet or township in the parish of Rudby, some four miles from the town of Stokesley, in Cleveland. Upon a round knoll at this place a most pestilent dragon, or worm, took up its abode; whence it came, or what was its origin, no one knew. Read More »

Thomas Holt And The Devil

Roy Palmer in 'The Folklore Of Warwickshire (1976)' tells us that 'A Coventry musician, called Thomas Holt, who had nineteen children, sold himself to the devil to solve his financial problems. Read More »

Tre'r Ceiri (Town of Fortresses)

To the North of Pwllheli, between the main road from Llanaelhaearn to Llithfaen, and the coast, are three peaks known as ‘the Rivals’ in English and ‘Yr Eifl’ in Welsh. Upon the eastern peak is an Iron Age hill fort called Tre’r Ceiri which is regarded by many as the most important prehistoric town in North Wales if not the whole of Europe. Read More »

Trethevy Quoit or King Arthur's Quoit

Trevethy Quoit

Trevethy Quoit, also known as King Arthur's Quoit, is one of the more impressive burial chambers in Cornwall. Standing at over 15 feet 4.6 Metres. This cromlech dates from the Bronze Age period. The capstone is pierced by a hole, the purpose of which is unknown. Read More »

Tsul'kälû, The Slant-Eyed Giant

The Tsul`kälû, (Judaculla or Tuli-cula or Juthcullah), a giant with sloped or slanted eyes appears in Cherokee legend as a figure associated withing hunting, a Master-of-Game. Read More »

Uffington Castle

Uffington Castle is an early Iron Age hill fort covering about 32,000 square metres. It was once protected by timber walls on top of the surviving banks and ditches, and faced with sarcen stones. It is likely that the tribe who created the White Horse once lived within this hill fort. Read More »

Uffington White Horse and Dragon Hill

Uffington White Horse

The White Horse of Uffington is one of the most impressive sites close to the ancient Ridgeway path, which traverses the steep chalk downs brooding over the Vale of the White Horse. Other sites include Dragon Hill, The Manger and Uffington Castle, which have been the subject of legend and folklore for over a thousand years. Read More »

Unsworth Dragon

According to ‘Lancashire Legends’ (1873) by John Harland & T T Wilkinson, ‘One of the most noted dragon stories of Lancashire has its locality assigned to Unsworth, a small village or hamlet about three miles from Bury. Read More »

Ûñtsaiyï', The Gambler

Thunder lives in the west, or a little to the south of west, near the place where the sun goes down behind the water. In the old times he sometimes made a journey to the east, and once after he had come back from one of these journeys a child was born in the east who, the people said, was his son. Read More »

Upper Denton

The local church made from the distinctive stones taken from Hadrian's Wall dates back to Saxon times. The churchyard holds the grave of Margaret Teasdale who died aged ninety-eight in 1777. Items found in her home after her death led the locals to believe she had an interest in the occult and she has been regarded as a witch since then.

Upsall

Upsall is associated with a common tale: A man from the village dreamed for three consecutive nights that he should go to London and stand on London Bridge. Conceding to impulse he went to London and while on the bridge he was approached by a Quaker, to whom he told his dream. Read More »

Vayne Castle

The ruin of the Z-plan Vayne Castle dates from the 16th century was built by the Lindsays. There is a Devil legend associated with the castle according to 'The History and Traditions of the Land of the Lindsays' (1882), which states that: Read More »

Veryan

Five circular thatched houses, within the village are supposed to have been designed to ensure that the Devil cannot hide in any corners. Each house is topped with a cross, a further deterrent to the Devil. In actuality they were built by the Reverend Jeremiah Trist for his daughters. The houses are now in private ownership. Read More »

Wade and his Wife

Foawr

Wade and his wife were two giants, said to have lived in the area around Whitby in North Yorkshire. As part of the old race they both had the most tremendous powers, and could lift mountains and throw giant boulders like pebbles. Read More »

The Wawel Dragon (Smok Wawelski)

Smok Wawelski

According to legend the Wawel Dragon or Smok Wawelski resided beside the River Vistula in a cave under Wawel Hill, upon which can now be found the Royal Wawel Castle and Wawel Cathedral in the city of Kraków. Read More »

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy

Wayland's Smithy is one of the most impressive and atmospheric Neolithic burial chambers in Britain. Somehow this ancient grave became associated with Wayland, the Saxon god of metalworking, from whom it takes its name.

History Read More »

Westminster Abbey

Since 1066AD, Westminster Abbey has been the traditional coronation and burial site for British monarchs, but there are no members of the Royal family among the ghosts that reputedly haunt here. Read More »

The Wherwell Cockatrice

Wherwell Cockatrice

Nothing now remains of Wherwell Priory and a Manor House now stands in its place. The priory was founded by Queen Elfrida, widow of King Edgar the Peaceful circa 986AD. Read More »

Whirly Pit, Olney

Oliver Ratcliff gives the following legend concerning this pond in his ‘Olney, Bucks’ Almanack (1907). ‘At the north end of the town there is a pond known as the Whirly Pit. This was supposed to be bottomless and to be fed by some mysterious spring. It is a curious fact that it never show’s any signs of becoming dry. Read More »

Whitby

Whitby is associated with a wealth of traditions and legends. The abbey, now a guant ruin, was built in 651AD and destroyed in a Danish raid in 870AD, it was reconstructed by the Benedictines in the 11th Century. At one time crowds used to gather at the West side of Whitby churchyard, where there was clear view of the North side of the abbey and the highest window. Read More »

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »

Winklebury Camp

Local folklore suggests that if you walk around the Iron Age hillfort seven times at midnight, the Devil will appear on a large black horse and grant one wish.

Only brave people should attempt this as the Devil will always try to trick people into losing their souls to him.

Wiveliscombe

The red sandstone Church of St Andrew in Wiveliscombe was designed by Richard Carver and built between 1827-1829. It has a font and a sandstone cross which date to the 14th century, but interestingly it also has a devil legend associated with it. When the church was being built, the devil appeared riding a green dragon and started to hurl rocks at the church. Read More »

The Wizard of Alderley Edge

Alderley Edge may have been a sacred site for many thousands of years; the area is steeped in folklore and legend. King Arthur and his men are said to sleep somewhere beneath the sandstone cliffs, and the area is associated with the wizard Merlin. Read More »

The Wolf of Allendale / The Hexham Wolf

Wolf illustration

"Wolf at Large in Allendale" was the headline of The Hexham Courant on 10th December 1904. The Courant reported that in the last three weeks, farmers around the village of Allendale were stabling their animals at night as loss of livestock had become a serious concern. Read More »



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