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Legends


Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Llwyn-y-pia

Ffynnon Fair is a holy well situated outside the village of Llwyn-y-pia. The well is the oldest recorded Christian site in the Rhondda. Some historians date the site back further, and it could be pagan in origin. The water from the well is reputed to cure ailments, especially rheumatism and poor eyesight. Rhisiart ap Rhys wrote: Read More »

Filey Brigg

Filey Brigg is a long ridge of rocks jutting into the North Sea, associated with folklore concerning the Devil and a dragon. Read More »

The Flying Dutchman

The Flying Dutchman is the most famous example of a phantom ship, although its true origins are now lost in the mists of time. It is the prime folk motif of this type, appearing in various adaptations and in literature, most recently given graphic solidity in the Pirates of the Caribbean films. Read More »

Forbidden Plateau, Vancouver Island

The Forbidden Plateau is on the eastern side of Vancouver Island in the Strathcona Provincial Park, nestled between Mount Albert Edward and Mount Washington. According to the indigenous coastal hunting Comox (Komox, K’omoks) people the Forbidden Plateau is inhabited by evil spirits that supposedly consume any women and children that venture up there. Read More »

Fortingall Yew Tree

Fortingall Yew Tree

The ancient remains of the yew tree which survives within its own walled enclosure in Fortingall Churchyard is claimed to be the oldest living tree in Europe. Read More »

Fynnon Powell (Powell’s Well)

This spring on the Great Orme is a water source that doesn’t seem to dry up, even in the driest weather. There is a story associated with the well, which tells of its mysterious formation. Many years ago, the Powell family lived in a dwelling close to where the well is now situated. Read More »

Gallarus Oratory

Gallarus Oratory Front

Ireland has a history of early Christian settlement dating as far back as the 6th century when monastic settlements were developed as bastions of the faith in the remote Irish countryside. Gallarus Oratory is the oldest and best preserved example of an early church that served one of these small settlements, and is probably one of the oldest intact buildings in Ireland. Read More »

Gawain and The Green Knight

The story of Gawain and the Green Knight, follows a theme that is to be found in other Celtic myths, and is typical of the supernatural testing of warriors. The beheading challenge is a common folklore motif, and can be found in the tales of Cuchulian the hound of Ulster. Read More »

Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthur

A brief run through of Geoffrey of Monmouth's version of the Arthurian legend from 'The History of the Kings of Britain'. Read More »

Geraint The Son Of Erbin

Geraint The Son Of Erbin is a tale from the Mabinogion. The following translation by Lady Charlotte Guest was published in 1877. Read More »

Giant Blacksmith of Batcombe

A skilled giant blacksmith lived upon Burn Hill according to local legend and he would appear whenever his name was called in order to perform acts of blacksmithing which was considered beyond the capability of mortal man.

Giants Stone of Tweedsmuir

Three ancient stones on the road to Fruid Reservoir from Tweedsmuir are linked with the legend and death of Jack the Giantkiller. Read More »

Gifu Castle and The White Serpent God

The current cement Gifu Castle was built in the 1950’s to replace the original which was destroyed when Japan was bombed during World War II. The original castle dated from around 1201 and may have been one of the locations where the following legend of the White Serpent God was set. Read More »

Giggleswick

The ebbing and flowing well: legend tells how a nymph was being chased by a satyr who was overcome with lust. The nymph prayed to the gods and was saved by being turned into a well - famous for healing. The only thing that remained of the nymph was her eternal breath that causes the well to ebb and flow like the tides. Read More »

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle is known as one of the most haunted castles in Britain. It certainly has more stories and legends attached to it than any other castle within the British Isles, perhaps with the exception of Hermitage Castle in the Scottish Borders. Read More »

Glastonbury

Glastonbury Tor Landscape

Glastonbury has been identified with the mysterious Isle of Avalon from the twelfth century, its past has become steeped in myth and legend, and it is probably most famous for its Arthurian and early Christian traditions. Read More »

Glastonbury Abbey, Arthur's Grave

Arthur's Cross

This is a reproduction of the cross said to have been found in Arthur's grave at Glastonbury Abbey. The actual grave seems to have been a very early burial but the Arthur link is tenuous. The actual cross disappeared many years ago and the only depiction is from a drawing by William Camden in 1607, from which this picture has been redrawn. Read More »

Glastonbury Arthur's Avalon

Arthur's Cross

Beside the main roads leading into the dreamy Somerset town of Glastonbury, are a series of signboards welcoming all to 'The Ancient Avalon', and causing a nationwide controversy. Glastonbury claims to be Avalon, to be the final resting place of King Arthur, and the site to which the Holy Grail was borne to by Joseph of Arimethea. Read More »

Glastonbury Holy Thorn Tree

Holy Thorn

I have visited Glastonbury many times over the last few decades, but only got around to visiting the Holy Thron on Wearyall Hill for the first time in September 2011. Unfortunately it was in a poor state after being vandalised the previous December and then apparently further damaged by souvenir hunters. Read More »

Goodwin Sands

The Goodwin Sands is a treacherous sand bank in the Channel a few miles off Deal, which has been the site of litterally hundreds of shipwrecks in centuries past, one of the last notable victims being the Ross Revenge, last of the pirate radio ships, in 1991. Read More »

The Grave of Gelert

Gelerts Grave

'In the 13th century Llywelyn, prince of North Wales, had a palace at Beddgelert. One day he went hunting without Gelert, "The Faithful Hound", who was unaccountably absent. On Llywelyn's return the truant, stained and smeared with blood, joyfully sprang to meet his master. Read More »

Great Mere, Ellesmere

This 100 acre lake was reputedly a meadow that once surrounded a well that was used by all the local inhabitants. According to legend the meadow flooded to create the lake in response to either the locals being banned from using the well by the meadows owner or in response to the prayers of the locals complaining that the price to draw water was too high.

Green Bridge Cave

The cave is associated with the common legend that a fiddler (sometimes a piper in other stories) went in to the cave to play and never returned, perhaps crossing through to the fair realm. His music is still said to be heard now and again from the depths of the cave.

Directions: Pendine is reached from the A4066

Hairy Bob's Cave

Hairy Bob's Cave

On the seafront at the foot of the cliffs around Scarborough Castle, a hole in the cliff, about a metre deep can be found - this is known as Hairy Bob's Cave. It is clearly man-made and little more than a hole in the rock but, the origins and reasons behind its existence have been the source of legend and folklore in the town for over a century. Read More »

Handale Priory, Scaw and the Serpent

Writing in 1888, Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' gives the following account of the death of the Handale Serpent. 'In ancient times these quiet woods were infested by a huge serpent, possessed of most singular fascinating powers, which used to beguile young damsels from the paths of truth and duty, and afterwards feed on their dainty limbs. Read More »



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