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Glastonbury Holy Thorn Tree

Holy Thorn

I have visited Glastonbury many times over the last few decades, but only got around to visiting the Holy Thron on Wearyall Hill for the first time in September 2011. Unfortunately it was in a poor state after being vandalised the previous December and then apparently further damaged by souvenir hunters. Read More »

Goodwin Sands

The Goodwin Sands is a treacherous sand bank in the Channel a few miles off Deal, which has been the site of litterally hundreds of shipwrecks in centuries past, one of the last notable victims being the Ross Revenge, last of the pirate radio ships, in 1991. Read More »

The Grave of Gelert

Gelerts Grave

'In the 13th century Llywelyn, prince of North Wales, had a palace at Beddgelert. One day he went hunting without Gelert, "The Faithful Hound", who was unaccountably absent. On Llywelyn's return the truant, stained and smeared with blood, joyfully sprang to meet his master. Read More »

Great Mere, Ellesmere

This 100 acre lake was reputedly a meadow that once surrounded a well that was used by all the local inhabitants. According to legend the meadow flooded to create the lake in response to either the locals being banned from using the well by the meadows owner or in response to the prayers of the locals complaining that the price to draw water was too high.

Green Bridge Cave

The cave is associated with the common legend that a fiddler (sometimes a piper in other stories) went in to the cave to play and never returned, perhaps crossing through to the fair realm. His music is still said to be heard now and again from the depths of the cave.

Directions: Pendine is reached from the A4066

Hairy Bob's Cave

Hairy Bob's Cave

On the seafront at the foot of the cliffs around Scarborough Castle, a hole in the cliff, about a metre deep can be found - this is known as Hairy Bob's Cave. It is clearly man-made and little more than a hole in the rock but, the origins and reasons behind its existence have been the source of legend and folklore in the town for over a century. Read More »

Handale Priory, Scaw and the Serpent

Writing in 1888, Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' gives the following account of the death of the Handale Serpent. 'In ancient times these quiet woods were infested by a huge serpent, possessed of most singular fascinating powers, which used to beguile young damsels from the paths of truth and duty, and afterwards feed on their dainty limbs. Read More »

Hangman's Stone, Upper Lambourn

There is a legend associated with the Hangman's Stone found at a junction of tracks 1.5Km north of Upper Lambourn. Possibly a boundary stone or perhaps marking a site of an old gibbet, the story relates to a sheep stealer. One day a man with a stolen sheep over his shoulder rested at the stone and fell asleep. The sheep which had is legs tied began to struggle. Read More »

Hannah Beswick of Birchen Bower, Hollinwood

There used to be a large manor house (now demolished) called Birchen Bower in Hollinwood in Oldham, which was famous for its alleged haunting by a Grey Lady called Hannah Beswick. Read More »

The Helston Flurry Dance

8th May - The Helston Flurry Dance takes place, where Helstonians take part in a pagan ritual processional dance through the town in a custom that pre-dates Christianity and probably dates back to Celtic times. The dance takes place each eighth of May unless it falls on a Sunday or Monday and was probably originally a fertility or Spring festival. Read More »

Here Be Dragons And Ghosts...The Coiled Serpent And Otherworld Hoodies


Drakelow in Worcestershire derives its name from a mythological creature - the dragon. The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. In Old English wyrm means "serpent", draca means "dragon" (Skeat). Read More »

Here Is The Story Of Llud And Llevelys

The Story of Llud and Llevelys appears in the The Mabinogion and here is the translation published by Lady Charlotte Guest (1877). Read More »

The Hexham Heads


It was 1972, and at the Robson family home in Hexham, only ten minutes walk away from where the legendary Wolf of Allendale had roamed the woods, the two young Robson brothers dug up two small, carved stone heads whilst they w Read More »

The Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara – ancient seat of the Kings of Ireland – is the focal point in a complex landscape of ancient monuments dating from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. It is a stirring setting where mythology and history fuse together, and has been revered as a holy site for thousands of years. Read More »

Hollow Demon Oak

A tree known as Derwen Ceubren yr Ellyl (hollow tree of the demons/spirits) used to stand in Nannau Park and it had a reputation of being haunted and evil, for this is the tree in which Owain Glyndwr was, according to legend, supposed to have hidden the body of his cousin Hywel Sele, 8th Lord of Nannau after he had killed him in 1404. Read More »

Hulme Hall

Hulme Hall (1)

There are several buildings known as Hulme Hall including one in Allostock, a Grammar School in Cheadle Hulme and a hall of residence for Manchester University. However, the long lost Hulme Hall which was the seat of the Prestwich family is thought to have a hidden treasure protected by occult powers. Read More »

The Hurlers

The Hurlers Stone Circles

The Hurlers are three stone circles situated on moorland to the Northwest of Minions. The circles are aligned Southwest to Northeast and consist of low granite blocks of varying shapes and sizes. They date back to the Bronze Age period. According to legend they are reputed to be the petrified remains of men who were hurling on the Sabbath. Read More »

Icknield Way

This ancient trackway, believed to date to the Neolithic period, is said to be haunted by Roman legionaries and Black dogs.

At one time, before modern transport allowed freedom of movement, it was believed to lead directly to hell.

In Search of British Dragons

Dragon 1

The dragon is the great, great grandfather of all monsters. Before the daemon, before the vampire, before the werewolf, before the giant. Before them all was the original uber-monster the dragon. The dragon's image has crawled across cave paintings 25,000 years old, dwarfing mammoths. It has slithered across Chinese rock art in Shanxi province 8000 years before Christ. Read More »

Irish Folklore

From Newgrange - a reminder of a great age of monument building and ritual - through to natural wonders such as the Giant's Causeway, Ireland is a land of legend and mystery. The landscape is full of echoes of history interwoven with a rich mythology that forms an impressive and colourful heritage. Read More »



From 'Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There' 1872

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe. Read More »

Jan Tregeagle

The legend of the torments of Jan Tregeagle stretch from the bleak moors of Bodmin, to the lonely beaches of Land's End. He has been identified by some as a forgotten Celtic god who still haunts the landscape. Read More »

Jersey Devil –The Origins

Jersey Devil

Over the last 250 years there have been several sightings of a creature that has become known as the Jersey Devil (or Leeds Devil). Described as being bipedal with hooves and wings, the Jersey Devil would apparently dry up the milk within cows by breathing upon them. Read More »

Jiang Shi: The Hopping Vampire

In Mian county, in China's Shaanxi province, rural folk never venture out of doors after dark. The reason for this is that they fear the Jiang Shi: the hopping vampire. Read More »

Kilgram Bridge

The site of Kilgram Bridge has been used for thousands of years to cross the River Ure. This Norman bridge prossibly dates from 1145AD (certainly standing by 1301 AD) and was built by the monks from the Cistercian Jervaulx Abbey. It was built upon the remains of an early Roman paved ford, the well preserved remains of which were used as the bridge's foundations. Read More »



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