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Alcock's Arbour (aka Devil's Bag of Nuts)

There are two stories associated with this conical hill just off the road between Stratford and Alcester known as the Devil's Bag of Nuts and Alcock's Arbour. One 21 September which is the known as the Devil's Nutting Day, Satan was collecting nuts when he was surprised by the Virgin Mary. Read More »

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle sits in a prominent position on castle hill above the town and is now in a ruined and dangerous condition. The castle was important during the Scottish - English wars, and was scene to an infamous event known as Wallace's Larder. An English garrison was stationed at the Castle, and Wallace arranged a decoy fire in the village. Read More »

Ardvreck Castle

This ruined castle on the shore of Loch Assynt, was originally built by the MacLeods. Read More »

Banwell Cross

A two feet high pillow mound earthwork shaped as a cross in Banwell has a Devil legend attached to it. According to the story, the villagers of Banwell attempted to erect a large cross on Banwell Hill, but each night the Devil would come along and blow it down. In order to prevent this the villagers decided to create the cross on the ground making it difficult for the Devil to destroy. Read More »

Black Calf Of Narberth

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) tells us of what may have been the ghost of an animal or as those in the North of England may refer to as a hairy ghost. However, this one, according to Sykes may have been something more sinister. Read More »

Bleeding Heart Yard and Lady Elizabeth Hatton

There is a Devil legend associated with Bleeding Heart Yard that ends in the horrific death of Lady Elizabeth Hatton. The scene of the legend is a grand ball at Hatton House on 26 January 1626 (though sometimes shown as 1662). Lady Hatton attracted a lot of attention as she danced throughout the night being both a young beauty and very wealthy. Read More »

Brent Pelham and Piers Shonks

‘A mighty dragon made its lair under the roots of an ancient yew tree and wrought havoc in the surrounding countryside. Piers Shonks, Lord of the Manor of Pelham, fought it accompanied by three huge hounds. He finally triumphed by thrusting a long spear down the dragon’s throat. Read More »

Capel Salem

Salem

Built in 1850, this Baptist Chapel was made famous by the Devon artist Sydney Curnow Vosper (29 October 1866 – 10 July 1942) in 1908, when he painted a member of the congregation in traditional Welsh costume. Read More »

Carlin Maggie Stone

Carlin Maggie's stone is a 40-foot natural stone column formed of volcanic basalt. Read More »

Castle Hill, Thetford

Castle Hill (Castle Mound or Military Parade) is the remains of Thetford's second castle, a 12th century motte and bailey castle which replaced the towns earlier 11th century Red Castle. Read More »

Chanctonbury Ring

Chanctonbry Ring

Chanctonbury Ring is a hill on the Sussex Downs some 700 feet above sea level and, until the hurricane, which swept across Southern England, was crowned with beech trees. Excavations at the site showed that the ramparts dated from 300 BC. Remains of several Roman buildings were found during the early digs, along with various items and fragments of pottery. Read More »

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Newington

The Grade I listed Church of St Mary the Virgin in Newington possibly dates from as early as 1163 and was built by Richard de Lucy. There is a Devil legend attached to the church relating to a stone that once stood on the corner of Church Lane but was moved to the church entrance in 1936. Read More »

Cley Hill

Cley Hill 2

Cley hill has a Devil legend attached to it. The Devil was travelling from Somerset carrying a huge sack of earth, with which he intended to bury the town of Devises. The people of the town had offended him in some way probably by converting to Christianity. Read More »

Clitheroe Castle

It has been suggested in Roby’s Traditions of Lancashire, that the Motte and Bailey Clitheroe Castle may date back to before 1086, being built by Roger de Poictou (also known as Roger Pictavensis). Roger was a supporter of King William I and was granted 398 Saxon Manors following the Norman invasion of 1066. Read More »

Cornu

According to legend the Cornu was a great black bird, described as being like a wingless and featherless heron that occupied a cavern at the medieval pilgrimage site of St Patrick’s Purgatory, Saint’s Island, Read More »

Crail

A large stone, close to the churchyard is said to have been thrown by the Devil from the Isle of May. It is possible that the stone was part of a sacred site here before the church. Read More »

Devil Conjuration In Merthyr Tydfil

Before Picton Street in Merthyr Tydfil was replaced by Caedraw Road, you could find the Black Lion Inn (58 Picton Street), and according to the following story which appeared in British Goblins (1881) by Wirt Sykes, two of its drunken customers attempted to summon the Devil which appeared to them in the shape of a gosling. 'These men were one night drinking together at the Black Lion Inn, when Read More »

Devil In Risca

According to British Goblins (1881) by Wirt Sykes; 'To William Jones, a sabbath-breaker, of Risca village, the devil appeared as an enormous mastiff dog, which transformed itself into a great fire and made a roaring noise like burning gorse'.

Devil Summoning Tailor of Glanbran

The 18th century Glanbran House was dismantled around 1930 and was the ancestral home of the Gwynne family, the descendants of David Goch Gwyn who settled at Glanbran in the 16th century. Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins: Welsh Folk-Lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions (1881) gives the following story in which an unnamed member of the Gwynne family plays a prominent part. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Kirkby Lonsdale

Devil's Bridge over the river Lune, is associated with a legend that can be found throughout Britain, with minor variations from region to region. A woman who was separated from her cow by the river made a pact with the Devil. He would build a bridge across the river, in return for the soul of the first living thing to cross the bridge. Read More »

Devil's Ditch, Garboldisham

The Devil's Ditch which possibly dates from the Iron Age, though was probably recut in the Middle Saxon period, is a two long ditch with low flanking banks. Read More »

The Devil's Dyke

Two giant earthworks named the Devil's Dyke and the Slad, enclose and area of around 40 hectares to the South of St Albans. The area was excavated in 1932 by Sir Mortimer Wheeler, and the ditch was found to have had an original depth of nearly thirteen metres making it a huge undertaking. Read More »

The Devil's Stone, Shebbear

The stone that lies in the village square to the East of the church is turned every year on November the 5th by local people. The stone is made from a type of quartz not found in the area, measures about six feet by four feet and weighs about a ton. Read More »

Devil’s Dyke

The Devil’s Dyke is a V shaped valley roughly 100 feet deep that was created by erosion caused by an ancient river, however local legends would have us belief that it was created by the Devil himself, hence its name. Read More »

Filey Brigg

Filey Brigg is a long ridge of rocks jutting into the North Sea, associated with folklore concerning the Devil and a dragon. Read More »



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