You are hereDevil


Devil’s Jumps

Three small hills near Churt have been known as the Devils Jumps (or the Devils Three Jumps) since at least 1765. The highest of the three hills is known as Stony Jump. There are a few folk tales attached to these hills which explains their name. Read More »

Devil’s Punch Bowl, Hindhead

The Devil's Punch Bowl at Hindhead is a large natural hollow with several pieces of folk lore attached to Old Nick himself. Read More »

Devil’s Punchbowl

The Devil’s Punchbowl is a large hollow, which according to legend , the Devil disappeared within after ploughing Grim’s Ditch (or Devil’s Ditch) across the Berkshire Downs.

Filey Brigg

Filey Brigg is a long ridge of rocks jutting into the North Sea, associated with folklore concerning the Devil and a dragon. Read More »

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle is known as one of the most haunted castles in Britain. It certainly has more stories and legends attached to it than any other castle within the British Isles, perhaps with the exception of Hermitage Castle in the Scottish Borders. Read More »

Jersey Devil –The Origins

Jersey Devil

Over the last 250 years there have been several sightings of a creature that has become known as the Jersey Devil (or Leeds Devil). Described as being bipedal with hooves and wings, the Jersey Devil would apparently dry up the milk within cows by breathing upon them. Read More »

John Jenkin Devil Summoner

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) gives the following account of a devil summoning ceremony performed by a schoolmaster and renowned conjurer named John Jenkin in Pembrokeshire. Read More »

Kilgram Bridge

The site of Kilgram Bridge has been used for thousands of years to cross the River Ure. This Norman bridge prossibly dates from 1145AD (certainly standing by 1301 AD) and was built by the monks from the Cistercian Jervaulx Abbey. It was built upon the remains of an early Roman paved ford, the well preserved remains of which were used as the bridge's foundations. Read More »

Lee Green Scar, Extwistle

According to Leslie Chapple 'Romantic Old Houses and Their Tales', ‘In 1902, in a lecture to the Burnley Literary and Scientific Club, Mr. Read More »

Llanarth Church

Llanarth church is associated with a legend of the Devil; unusually the Devil creeps into the church and tries to steal one of the church bells. (It is more common for him to steal the whole church). In the process of his theft he wakes the vicar who challenges him with the name of Christ. Eventually the Devil concedes, and jumps off the church tower. Read More »

Llangar Church, Corwen

The white washed Llangar Church can be found about a mile from Corwen and can be dated from the late 13th century though it could possibly be as old as the 11th century. Its original name of 'Llan Garw Gwyn' (The Church of The White Deer) possibly alludes to a legend dating back its initial erection. Read More »

Llyn Idwal

Llyn Idwal is a small glacial lake in Snowdonia, easily accessible from the A5. The path begins at Ogwen Cottage at the foot of Llyn Ogwen, crosses a stream and then turns right after a quarter of a mile in to Cwm Idwal, a dramatic valley surrounded by the crags of Glyder fawr, Twll Du (‘The Black Hole’ or more popularly known as ‘the Devils Kitchen’) and Y Garn. Read More »

Long Compton

About a mile from the Rollright Stones, it was once it was said that ‘There are enough witches in Long Compton to draw a load of hay up Long Compton Hill.’ Roy Palmer in his 'The Folklore Of Warwickshire' gives the following brief account of account of someone contacting the D Read More »

Lordscairnie Castle

The castle has links with the legend of the more infamous Glamis Castle. Read More »

Marston Mortaine

The 14th century St Mary's church is unusual because it has a separate tower away from the main church. The tower was probably a means of refuge in Saxon times, either from flood or from attack. Read More »

Meon Hill, Lower Quinton

An Iron Age hill fort once stood upon Meon Hill and it has been suggested that man has lived there from the Stone Age, but it a legend concerning the formation of the hill that has attracted my attention. Read More »

Mother Ludlam's Cave

Mother Ludham’s Cave, was so named after the White Witch that was said to live in it. This small sandstone cave can be found in the Wey Valley and is also associated with the ruined Cistercian Waverley Abbey, or more correctly the spring inside it is associated with the monks that lived there. This spring was known as Ludwell and later St Mary's Well. Read More »

The Longstone at Mottistone

Longstone at Mottistone

This impressive standing stone and its smaller recumbent companion, are believed to be all that is left of a chambered long barrow from the Neolithic period, the remaining stones once being part of the tomb entrance.   Read More »


Five black marks on the front porch of the church are said to have been left by the devil, who attacked the church trying to get Sir Roland Alstons. Sir Roland is said to have sold his immortal soul to the Devil and was seeking sanctuary when the time to hand it over had arrived.

The ghost of Sir Roland is said to appear at the church riding a black mount every 100 years. Read More »

Olney Houses & Devil Legends

The following stories associating the Devil with homes in Olney were published in ‘Olney, Bucks’ (1907) by Oliver Ratcliff. ‘According to legendary accounts the Devil seems to have frequently favoured Olney with his presence. Read More »

Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul, Olney

According to ‘A History of the County of Buckingham: Volume 4’ (1927) ‘A church existed in the parish from a very early period, probably long before 1273, the date of the first known reference, but the present structure was built during the middle of the 14th century, the chancel being erected first and the other parts of the building some few years later. Read More »


Map of Pluckley, Kent

Often mooted as the most haunted village in England, this picturesque Kentish village is certainly steeped in ghost stories, whether based on actual sightings or just modern folklore. Its reputation as a ghost village is not without its problems and the village can be a magnet to thrill seekers and also those with a genuine interest in the paranormal, especially around Halloween. Read More »

Pont Aberglaslyn

Pont Aberglaslyn

Pont Aberglaslyn has a bridge with a connection to the Devil. It is very similar to other Devil and bridge related stories found throughout the British Isles. The Devil built the bridge on the understanding that he would receive the soul of the first living creature to cross over it. When the bridge was finished he went to the local inn to inform the magician Robin Ddu that it was ready. Read More »

Rhyd-y-Cae Bridge, Pentrefoelas

There is a legend associated with Rhyd-y-Cae Bridge where a local man was enticed into a game of cards with Satan himself. The following account of the story appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887). Read More »

River Monnow Bridge, Kentchurch

In 'The Folk-Lore of Herefordshire' (1912), Ella Mary Leather gave the following account of a bridge associated with the Devil. This bridge crosses the River Monnow which separates Gwent from Herefordshire. Read More »



Recent comments

Featured Site