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Satan Seen Lying Right Across A Road

The following story appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887). 'Near Pentrevoelas lived a man called John Ty’nllidiart, who was in the habit of taking, yearly, cattle from the uplands in his neighbourhood, to be wintered in the Vale of Clwyd. Read More »

Satan Taking Possession Of A Man Who Fished On Sunday

The following tale is in its main features still current in Cynwyd, a village about two miles from Corwen. The first reference to the story that I am acquainted with appeared in an essay sent in to a local Eisteddfod in 1863. The story is thus related in this essay:— Read More »

The Six Hills, Stevenage

The six hills which occupy prominence in the town are tumuli or Round Barrows dating from the Bronze Age. According to legend the hills are spade fulls of earth taken from Whomerly wood and thrown at the town by a giant (or the Devil) intent on destruction. His last shot went well off mark and knocked the steeple off Gravely Church two miles away. Read More »

Smoo Cave

Smoo Cave is a limestone cavern consisting of three chambers, a burn enters the second chamber through a hole in the roof falling for a distance of 80 feet. Read More »

St Andrew's Churchyard, Rodney Street

Pyramid Tomb

A pyramid monument to the William McKenzie (20 March 1794-29 October 1851) rests in the churchyard of the (currently disused and needing restoration) Scottish Presbyterian Church of St Andrew's, dating from 1824. McKenzie made his fortune as a civil engineer in the Victorian era but it is the nature of his burial, or lack of it that has become legendary. Read More »

St David's Church (aka Leicester's Church), Denbigh

St David's or Leicester's Church in Denbigh dates from 1578 – 1579. Intended to be a new Cathedral Church for the St Asaph dioceses it is thought to have been the largest church built in the Elizabethan Age, or would have been if it ad been completed. Read More »

St Mary's Church, Ambrosden

The church has a siting legend attached to it, every morning when the stone masons returned to the field in which the church was being built, they would find the stones to have mysteriously moved to another site. Eventually after happening on a number of occasions the workmen gave up and built the church where the stones reappeared. The Devil was blamed as the prime suspect. Read More »

St Patrick’s Chair and Well

St Patrick’s Chair and Well (also known as the Druids Chair and Well or St Brigid’s Well or St Brigit’s Well) lies within Altadeven Wood, not far from the Ulster Way footpath. The chair is a huge 2m high stone block, shaped like a throne. Read More »

Stanton Drew Stone Circle

Stanton Drew(1)

The Neolithic ritual site of Stanton Drew consists of three stone circles and a group of stones referred to as 'The Cove'. The largest of the circles known as the Great Circle consists of 27 stones, most of which are recumbent (lying down) having fallen in the past. Read More »

Stiperstones

Striper Tones

As with many tales regarding in Britain about the Devil, this one also has him carrying an apron full of stones, in this case from Ireland. He sat to rest upon what is now called The Devil's Chair and is the highest rock on this ridge. As usual, the apron strings break and he drops his load of stones. Read More »

The Devil Appearing To A Dissenting Minister At Denbigh

“The Rev. Mr. Thomas Baddy, who lived in Denbigh Town, and was a Dissenting Minister in that place, went into his study one night, and while he was reading or writing, he heard some one behind him laughing and grinning at him, which made him stop a little—as well indeed it might. Read More »

The Devil of Drakelowe

In 'Collections for a history of Staffordshire' (1880) we are introduced to the following account of the events surrounding the case know as The Devil of Drakelowe and the abandonment of the hamlet. The story may have its origins in the Anglo Saxon meaning of Drakelow, 'Dragons Mound' which may indicate a burial site with a guardian spirit. Read More »

The Devil's Apronful

In his  ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ (1888), Rev Thomas Parkinson gave the following account of how the stones known as The Devil's Apronful got their name. Read More »

The Devil's Arrows

The Devil's Arrows are three Neolithic Megaliths - the tallest of which is 23 feet high - standing in a crooked alignment of around 580 feet. The fourth stone was destroyed in the 16th century, when Camden noted that it had been pulled down by treasure seekers.

In legend they were thrown by the Devil from Howe Hill to destroy Aldborough, hence their common name. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge At Lake Galenbeck

Karl Bartsch gave the following Devil bridge story in his 'Tales and legends and traditions of Mecklenburg' (Sagen, Märchen und Gebräuche aus Meklenburg) published in 1879. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Burnsall

There stories throughout Britain of the Devil building bridges and Rev Thomas Parkinson in his 'Yorkshire Legends and Traditions' (1888) gives the following account for the bridge over the River Dibb at Burnsall. Read More »

The Devil's Elbow

A curved stretch of road on the B6105 between Glossop and Woodhead is known as the Devils Elbow, it has been the scene of strange events and is associated with a Devil legend. Many place names in this area may have strange origins. Names such as Shining Clough and Lantern Pike suggest places associated with mysterious light phenomena. Read More »

The Devils Bridge

Devils Bridge

There are three bridges over this part of the Mynach Gorge, each one built successively over the others, as they needed to be improved for traffic. The lowest of the bridges dating from the 11th century is the original one and is associated with a Devil legend that is common in Britain with minor variations from place to place. Read More »

The Devil’s Tree, Llanrhos

The following account entitled 'The Devil’s Tree by Eglwys Rhos' appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh Folk-lore' (1887). 'At the corner of the first turning after passing the village of Llanrhos*, on the left hand side, is a withered oak tree, called by the natives of those parts the Devil’s Tree, and it was thought to be haunted, and therefore the young and timid were afraid to pass it Read More »

The Dule Upo' Dun

‘A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6’(1911) mentions that ‘On the road from Clitheroe to Waddington, near Brungerley Bridge, once stood an inn known as the 'Dule upo' Dun', from its sign representing the Devil galloping madly along upon a dun horse. Read More »

The Treasure of Largo Law

The area around Largo Law is associated with many legends. The actual hill of Largo Law is volcanic in origin, and was said to have been created when the Devil dropped a huge boulder. Part of the outcrop on the top of Largo Law is known as the Devil's chair, and has seven steps leading up to it. Read More »

Thomas Holt And The Devil

Roy Palmer in 'The Folklore Of Warwickshire (1976)' tells us that 'A Coventry musician, called Thomas Holt, who had nineteen children, sold himself to the devil to solve his financial problems. Read More »

Vayne Castle

The ruin of the Z-plan Vayne Castle dates from the 16th century was built by the Lindsays. There is a Devil legend associated with the castle according to 'The History and Traditions of the Land of the Lindsays' (1882), which states that: Read More »

Veryan

Five circular thatched houses, within the village are supposed to have been designed to ensure that the Devil cannot hide in any corners. Each house is topped with a cross, a further deterrent to the Devil. In actuality they were built by the Reverend Jeremiah Trist for his daughters. The houses are now in private ownership. Read More »

Wievliscombe

The red sandstone Church of St Andrew in Wievliscombe was designed by Richard Carver and built between 1827-1829. It has a font and a sandstone cross which date to the 14th century, but interestingly it also has a devil legend associated with it. When the church was being built, the devil appeared riding a green dragon and started to hurl rocks at the church. Read More »



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