You are hereLlyn Peninsula

Llyn Peninsula


Abersoch Ghost Video (2012)

According to the Daily Mail in a 7 January 2012 article entitled ‘The ghost of the Valleys? Read More »

Bardsey Island

Bardsey Island (P)

The island is also known as the island of the currents and the saints. There are said to be the graves of 20,000 saints interred on the island, and legend suggests that anybody buried here will not go to hell no matter how wicked his deeds. Read More »

Bwgan Pant-y-Wennol

In his excellent book 'Haunted Wales: A Guide to Welsh Ghostlore', Richard Holland quotes the following article concerning a poltergeist at Pant-y-Wennol near Abersoch that appeared in the Caernarvon & Denbigh Herald, 29 May 1866. Read More »

Ffynnon Aelrhiw

Fynnon Aelrhiw can be found in a field below the church. It is a rectangular basin in a larger surround with evidence of flat stone seats. People visited this well because its waters are meant to have a healing effect on skin diseases.

Ffynnon Arian (Silver Well)

Ffynnon Arian in the village of Mynytho on the Llyn peninsula, Gwynedd is an ancient wishing well. It is a natural spring without traces of a structure according to ‘Holy Wells of Wales’.

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Bryncroes

This well can be found on the roadside in the village of Bryncroes. It is on, what was the main pilgrim route to Bardsey Island through the Lleyn Peninsula. Bryncroes was the probably the final stop for pilgrims heading to embark from Aberdaron. Read More »

Ffynnon Fair (St. Mary’s Well), Aberdaron

Ffynnon Fair can be found on the shore to the east of the precipitous rocks rising out of the sea known locally as ‘the wall’. This well always gives fresh water even though it is often covered over by the sea. It is said that a wish can be fulfilled by running with a mouthful of the water, three times around the quadrangle of the nearby St. Mary’s church. Read More »

Ffynnon Fyw (Well of Life)

Ffynnon Fyw is a well within a stone wall enclosure of about 7.3m squared. There is evidence of steps for bathing access. It is said the well was dedicated to Curig and tradition credits it with the belief that it restores sight to the blind and health to the sick.

Garn Boduan Hill Fort

Garn Boduan (279 metres in height) is an Iron Age hill fort situated on a steep isolated volcanic hill to the south of Nefyn. The site was surveyed during the 1950’s, when the remains of more than one hundred and seventy round houses, (of which the remains of about one hundred are identifiable whilst on the ground) were discovered. Read More »

Garn Fadryn Hill Fort

Garn Fadryn (371 metres in height), has on its summit a Middle Iron Age hillfort covering an area of approximately twenty-six acres in total. The hill fort construction seems to have been done in stages, the first stage taking place in around 300BC enclosing about twelve acres. Read More »

Plas-yn-Rhiw

Plas-yn-Rhiw is a 16th Century manor house which overlooks Hell's Mouth (Porth-y-Neigwl) on the Lleyn Peninsula. There has apparently been habitation at the site for over a thousand years, for there was a fortified house on the site in around 900AD built by Meirion Goch (a noble man of the minor gentry) to prevent incursions by Vikings into Porth-y-Neigwl. Read More »

Saint Cybi’s Holy Well

Well Buildings

Saint Cybi’s Holy Well at Llangybi in North Wales is one of those mysterious and difficult to find places which turn out to be well worth the effort. Certain places have an almost otherworldly atmosphere about them and Saint Cybi’s Well is certainly one of these. Read More »

St Aelhaearn’s Church

St Aelhaearn’s Church

Located in the village of Llanaelhaearn, the church is named after Aelhaearn, a disciple of Saint Beuno who travelled to the area in the 5th and 6th Centuries. In Wales this period was known as the ‘Age of Saints’ but in England, as ‘The Dark Ages’. Read More »

St Aelhaearn’s Well

St Aelhaearn’s Well

This well can be found on the outskirts of the village of Llanaelhaearn, on the left hand side of the road as you ascend the (B4417) out of the village. It is enclosed in a locked stone structure which was constructed in 1900, and it is in front of a house called Bryn Iddon. Read More »

St Beuno's Church and Chapel

St Beuno's Church and Chapel

In Clynnog Fawr, the shrine to Saint Bueno is a disproportionately large church for the size of the village, it dominates the area, and it’s probably one of the most important churches in North Wales. Read More »

St. Beuno's Well

St Beuno's Well

Saint Bueno was born in Powys, and became a missionary who had the protection of the King of Gwynedd, Cadfan. Bueno was awarded the village of Clynnog Fawr where he founded a church in 630.AD. Later the site became a monastery of great importance in Wales, since manuscripts have been found to say that the Abbot of Clynnog was entitled to a seat at the court of the King of Gwynedd. Read More »

The Ghost of Captain Davies, Nefyn

This is a ghost story from Nefyn, a town on the north coast of the Llyn peninsula with a strong sea faring tradition. One night, Captain Davies was apparently seen standing in the lamp light at the junction of Stryd Y Plas and Stryd Y Llan. Read More »

The Tale of Nant Gwrtheyrn

When Thomas Pennant was touring Wales, he noted that the three farms on the Nant were Tŷ Hen, Tŷ Canol and Tŷ Ychaf respectively. Read More »

Tre'r Ceiri (Town of Fortresses)

To the North of Pwllheli, between the main road from Llanaelhaearn to Llithfaen, and the coast, are three peaks known as ‘the Rivals’ in English and ‘Yr Eifl’ in Welsh. Upon the eastern peak is an Iron Age hill fort called Tre’r Ceiri which is regarded by many as the most important prehistoric town in North Wales if not the whole of Europe. Read More »



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site