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Aquatic Monsters Gazetteer


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Aquatic Monsters Gazetteer

Beisht Kione

The Beisht Kione was said to be a sea monster residing in the Irish Sea south of the Isle of Man. The name which means 'the beast with the black head, in Manx is said to have been feared by the local fishermen and sailors.

Black Sea Mermen

In 1996 a man named Borovikov was diving in the Anapa region of the Black Sea hunting sharks. Whilst he was eight meters deep he had a strange encounter with a mermaid type creature. In his article UFOs in the Soviet Waters, Paul Stonehill described the encounter. ‘He saw giant beings rising up from below. They were milky-white, but with humanoid faces, and something like fish tails. Read More »

Butt of Lewis

A sea monster was reputedly sighted in 1882. Another sea monster was reported in 1895, a few days after a similar creature was seen off Bernera. This creature was supposedly 120' long.

Cannock Chase Creatures

Over the past several years there have been numerous reports of strange encounters on and around Cannock Chase ranging from UFO’s, a Big Foot or Sasquatch, a Big Cat and a Giant Serpent, not to mention its haunting by a Phantom Black Dog.

Below are a series of articles have appeared in the Canock Chase Post and Birmingham Post. Read More »

Chance To Be Part Of Project Albion

ASSAP (The Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) in partnership with Mysterious Britain & Ireland is opening up its long running Project Albion to enable members of the public to directly contribute towards it. Read More »

The Dobhar-chu

The Dobhar-chu or water hound is a lake dwelling creature of Irish Folklore. It is covered in short white fur with a dark cross on it’s back and described as being like a dog or a large sea otter. Read More »

Dobhar-chú of Lough Mask

The following account of a Dobhar-chú in Lough Mask (Lake Mask) appeared in Roderic O’Flaherty’s (1629 – 1718) ‘A Description of West Connaught’ dated 1684 which was translated by James Hardiman in 1846. Read More »

Faroe Islands Mermaid

In 1723 a Royal Commission from Denmark visited the Faroe Islands in the Norwegian Sea to investigate claims of a mermaid being in the area. They saw a merman approach their ship, submerge then surface to stare at them intently with deep set eyes. Unsettling those aboard, the vessel was commanded to withdraw and as it pulled away, the creature puffed out his cheeks, roared and submerged again. Read More »

Filey Brigg

Filey Brigg is a long ridge of rocks jutting into the North Sea, associated with folklore concerning the Devil and a dragon. Read More »

Great Bernera

In 1895 a sea monster described as having a 15' neck is reputed to have been seen off Great Bernera. This is also the year that whaling began in North Harris, leading to the establishment of a whaling station by 1907.

Isle of Yell Mermaid

In July 1833 a team of six fishermen entangled a mermaid in their fishing lines off the Isle of Yell. Read More »

Lake Bala

Llyn Tegid

Llyn Tegid is Wales’s largest lake being nearly four miles long. It lies in a rift valley running north east to south west, extending down to the sea at Tywyn. The lake is 529 feet above sea level, has a maximum depth of 136 feet and covers an area of 1084 acres. Read More »

Lake Memphremagog

Lake Memphremagog (meaning "where there is a big expanse of water" in native Algonkian) is a thin twenty seven mile long freshwater glacial lake which some believe is the home to a huge serpent like creature known as Memphré. Lake Memphremagog spans across the border between Canada and the United States of America. Read More »

Lake Monsters

Apart from the famous Loch Ness Monster, there are many more reports of mysterious creatures within the lakes and lochs of Britain, dating as far back as recorded history, and probably further. Some are mingled with old folklore about dragons and mermaids, while the more modern sightings have often become attributed to unidentified real creatures, including extinct dinosaurs. Read More »

Llyn Cau

Llyn Cau

The glacial lake of Llyn Cau at Cader Idris is said to be bottomless and according to tradition it is thought to be the home of a lake monster responsible for drowning a man who went swimming in the cold waters. Read More »

Llyn Glaslyn (Lake of the Blue Spring)

At 1,970 feet above sea level, and covering an area of 18 acres Llyn Glaslyn is one of the glacial lakes of Yr Wyddfa (Mount Snowdon), and being the highest and remotest of the larger lakes it abounds in legend. Read More »

Loch Awe

Loch Awe is Scotlands third largest fresh water loch at with a length of 35km and total surface area of 14.9 miles. It shares a common legend about its creation which concerns a well that flooded. Read More »

Loch Morar

It is surprising how many lochs in Inverneshire have monster traditions and sightings, Loch Ness, Loch Lhinne, Loch Lochy, and Loch Arkaig to name a few. Read More »

Loch na Beiste

In his 'Guide to Gairloch and Loch Maree' (1886), John H. Dixon gave the following account of a creature that was said to live in Loch na Beiste roughly 50 years early. 'The existence of water-kelpies in Gairloch, if perhaps not universally credited in the present generation, was accepted as undoubted in the last. Read More »

Loch Ness

Urquart Castle

Loch Ness is famed in modern times as the supposed abode of a strange long necked monster, but the area is also rich in folklore, which Read More »

Loch Urabhal

Loch Uravel or Urabhal in Gaelic is a small body of water roughly 2 miles north of Achmore. On 27 July 1961 two teachers fishing at the loch had a strange experience. Thirty five metres from their boat they reputedly saw a two headed, single humped creature swim by.

Lough Derg

Lough Derg is a 2200 acre lake in County Donegal, famous for St Patrick's Purgatory which is still a popular of pilgrimage as it has been many centuries. Read More »

Lough Dubh Lake Monster

Lough Dubh or Black’s Lake is a popular fishing venue by the river suck which was the scene of a possible monster sighting in the early 1960’s a creature was hooked by Mr Mullaney (a schoolmaster) and his son whilst out fishing. Described as having "short thick legs with small ears and a white pointed horn on the snout. Read More »

Mawddach Sea Monster

Barmouth Estuary

During the last twentieth century there have been a few experiences that have led to suggestions that the Mawddach Estuary at Barmouth may be the home of a sea monster. According to Mysterious Wales by Chris Barber a local woman claimed to have found four large footprints in the sand, described as being ‘as big as an elephant’s’. Read More »

Morgawr

Morgawr, which is old Cornish for sea monster and has been seen several times this century.

There have been many sightings since 1926 and some photographs have been taken showing a dark mass with several humps. As with many monster photographs none of the pictures are clear enough to make any snap judgements. Read More »

Searrach Uisge

The creature, possibly a water horse of Loch Suainbhal is referred to as the Searrach Uisge. The creature was said to inhabit the loch for over a century and in the nineteenth century it was described as being like an capsized boat when it was seen swimming around. Another description has it being forty foot long and eel like. Read More »

The Blobster of the Isle of Benbeculla

In the early 1990’s a twelve foot carcass covered in sand and seaweed was discovered on a Benbecula beach by 16 year old Louise Whitts. Read More »

The Great Leech Of Tlanusi'yï

The following legend is taken from ‘Myths Of The Cherokee’ by James Mooney (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) ’The spot where Valley river joins Hiwassee, at Murphy, in North Carolina, is known among the Cherokees as Tlanusi'yï, "The Leech place," and this is the story they tell of it: Read More »

The Loch Ness Monster

Loch Ness Monster

The most publicised and well known of the lake monsters, Nessie has captured the popular imagination. There are hundreds of sightings on record, which describe a roughly similar creature in and out of the water over a period of 200 years. Read More »

The Well of Heads (Tobar nan Ceann)

Well of Heads

The monument which stands by the roadside above this ancient well was erected in 1812, its gory carving of a hand holding a dagger and seven severed heads commemorating an incident that took place in 1665. Read More »

Whistling Dobhar-chú of Lough Glenade

Dobhar-chu

In Conbnaíl (Conwell) Cemetery, Drummans, there is a tombstone depicting a carved Dobhar-chú .The grave is that of Grace Connolly (Grainne Ni Conalai), who apparently was killed by a Dobhar-chú from Lough Glenade on 24th September 1722. Read More »

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