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Devil Gazetteer

Alcock's Arbour (aka Devil's Bag of Nuts)

There are two stories associated with this conical hill just off the road between Stratford and Alcester known as the Devil's Bag of Nuts and Alcock's Arbour. One 21 September which is the known as the Devil's Nutting Day, Satan was collecting nuts when he was surprised by the Virgin Mary. Read More »

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle sits in a prominent position on castle hill above the town and is now in a ruined and dangerous condition. The castle was important during the Scottish - English wars, and was scene to an infamous event known as Wallace's Larder. An English garrison was stationed at the Castle, and Wallace arranged a decoy fire in the village. Read More »

Ardvreck Castle

This ruined castle on the shore of Loch Assynt, was originally built by the MacLeods. Read More »

Banwell Cross

A two feet high pillow mound earthwork shaped as a cross in Banwell has a Devil legend attached to it. According to the story, the villagers of Banwell attempted to erect a large cross on Banwell Hill, but each night the Devil would come along and blow it down. In order to prevent this the villagers decided to create the cross on the ground making it difficult for the Devil to destroy. Read More »

Black Calf Of Narberth

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) tells us of what may have been the ghost of an animal or as those in the North of England may refer to as a hairy ghost. However, this one, according to Sykes may have been something more sinister. Read More »

Bleeding Heart Yard and Lady Elizabeth Hatton

There is a Devil legend associated with Bleeding Heart Yard that ends in the horrific death of Lady Elizabeth Hatton. The scene of the legend is a grand ball at Hatton House on 26 January 1626 (though sometimes shown as 1662). Lady Hatton attracted a lot of attention as she danced throughout the night being both a young beauty and very wealthy. Read More »

Brent Pelham and Piers Shonks

‘A mighty dragon made its lair under the roots of an ancient yew tree and wrought havoc in the surrounding countryside. Piers Shonks, Lord of the Manor of Pelham, fought it accompanied by three huge hounds. He finally triumphed by thrusting a long spear down the dragon’s throat. Read More »

Capel Salem

Salem

Built in 1850, this Baptist Chapel was made famous by the Devon artist Sydney Curnow Vosper (29 October 1866 – 10 July 1942) in 1908, when he painted a member of the congregation in traditional Welsh costume. Read More »

Carlin Maggie Stone

Carlin Maggie's stone is a 40-foot natural stone column formed of volcanic basalt. Read More »

Castle Hill, Thetford

Castle Hill (Castle Mound or Military Parade) is the remains of Thetford's second castle, a 12th century motte and bailey castle which replaced the towns earlier 11th century Red Castle. Read More »

Chanctonbury Ring

Chanctonbry Ring

Chanctonbury Ring is a hill on the Sussex Downs some 700 feet above sea level and, until the hurricane, which swept across Southern England, was crowned with beech trees. Excavations at the site showed that the ramparts dated from 300 BC. Remains of several Roman buildings were found during the early digs, along with various items and fragments of pottery. Read More »

Church of St Mary the Virgin, Newington

The Grade I listed Church of St Mary the Virgin in Newington possibly dates from as early as 1163 and was built by Richard de Lucy. There is a Devil legend attached to the church relating to a stone that once stood on the corner of Church Lane but was moved to the church entrance in 1936. Read More »

Cley Hill

Cley Hill 2

Cley hill has a Devil legend attached to it. The Devil was travelling from Somerset carrying a huge sack of earth, with which he intended to bury the town of Devises. The people of the town had offended him in some way probably by converting to Christianity. Read More »

Clitheroe Castle

It has been suggested in Roby’s Traditions of Lancashire, that the Motte and Bailey Clitheroe Castle may date back to before 1086, being built by Roger de Poictou (also known as Roger Pictavensis). Roger was a supporter of King William I and was granted 398 Saxon Manors following the Norman invasion of 1066. Read More »

Cornu

According to legend the Cornu was a great black bird, described as being like a wingless and featherless heron that occupied a cavern at the medieval pilgrimage site of St Patrick’s Purgatory, Saint’s Island, Read More »

Crail

A large stone, close to the churchyard is said to have been thrown by the Devil from the Isle of May. It is possible that the stone was part of a sacred site here before the church. Read More »

Devil Conjuration In Merthyr Tydfil

Before Picton Street in Merthyr Tydfil was replaced by Caedraw Road, you could find the Black Lion Inn (58 Picton Street), and according to the following story which appeared in British Goblins (1881) by Wirt Sykes, two of its drunken customers attempted to summon the Devil which appeared to them in the shape of a gosling. 'These men were one night drinking together at the Black Lion Inn, when Read More »

Devil In Risca

According to British Goblins (1881) by Wirt Sykes; 'To William Jones, a sabbath-breaker, of Risca village, the devil appeared as an enormous mastiff dog, which transformed itself into a great fire and made a roaring noise like burning gorse'.

Devil Summoning Tailor of Glanbran

The 18th century Glanbran House was dismantled around 1930 and was the ancestral home of the Gwynne family, the descendants of David Goch Gwyn who settled at Glanbran in the 16th century. Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins: Welsh Folk-Lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions (1881) gives the following story in which an unnamed member of the Gwynne family plays a prominent part. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Kirkby Lonsdale

Devil's Bridge over the river Lune, is associated with a legend that can be found throughout Britain, with minor variations from region to region. A woman who was separated from her cow by the river made a pact with the Devil. He would build a bridge across the river, in return for the soul of the first living thing to cross the bridge. Read More »

Devil's Ditch, Garboldisham

The Devil's Ditch which possibly dates from the Iron Age, though was probably recut in the Middle Saxon period, is a two long ditch with low flanking banks. Read More »

The Devil's Dyke

Two giant earthworks named the Devil's Dyke and the Slad, enclose and area of around 40 hectares to the South of St Albans. The area was excavated in 1932 by Sir Mortimer Wheeler, and the ditch was found to have had an original depth of nearly thirteen metres making it a huge undertaking. Read More »

The Devil's Stone, Shebbear

The stone that lies in the village square to the East of the church is turned every year on November the 5th by local people. The stone is made from a type of quartz not found in the area, measures about six feet by four feet and weighs about a ton. Read More »

Devil’s Dyke

The Devil’s Dyke is a V shaped valley roughly 100 feet deep that was created by erosion caused by an ancient river, however local legends would have us belief that it was created by the Devil himself, hence its name. Read More »

Filey Brigg

Filey Brigg is a long ridge of rocks jutting into the North Sea, associated with folklore concerning the Devil and a dragon. Read More »

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle

Glamis Castle is known as one of the most haunted castles in Britain. It certainly has more stories and legends attached to it than any other castle within the British Isles, perhaps with the exception of Hermitage Castle in the Scottish Borders. Read More »

Jersey Devil –The Origins

Jersey Devil

Over the last 250 years there have been several sightings of a creature that has become known as the Jersey Devil (or Leeds Devil). Described as being bipedal with hooves and wings, the Jersey Devil would apparently dry up the milk within cows by breathing upon them. Read More »

John Jenkin Devil Summoner

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) gives the following account of a devil summoning ceremony performed by a schoolmaster and renowned conjurer named John Jenkin in Pembrokeshire. Read More »

Kilgram Bridge

The site of Kilgram Bridge has been used for thousands of years to cross the River Ure. This Norman bridge prossibly dates from 1145AD (certainly standing by 1301 AD) and was built by the monks from the Cistercian Jervaulx Abbey. It was built upon the remains of an early Roman paved ford, the well preserved remains of which were used as the bridge's foundations. Read More »

Llanarth Church

Llanarth church is associated with a legend of the Devil; unusually the Devil creeps into the church and tries to steal one of the church bells. (It is more common for him to steal the whole church). In the process of his theft he wakes the vicar who challenges him with the name of Christ. Eventually the Devil concedes, and jumps off the church tower. Read More »

Llangar Church, Corwen

The white washed Llangar Church can be found about a mile from Corwen and can be dated from the late 13th century though it could possibly be as old as the 11th century. Its original name of 'Llan Garw Gwyn' (The Church of The White Deer) possibly alludes to a legend dating back its initial erection. Read More »

Llyn Idwal

Llyn Idwal is a small glacial lake in Snowdonia, easily accessible from the A5. The path begins at Ogwen Cottage at the foot of Llyn Ogwen, crosses a stream and then turns right after a quarter of a mile in to Cwm Idwal, a dramatic valley surrounded by the crags of Glyder fawr, Twll Du (‘The Black Hole’ or more popularly known as ‘the Devils Kitchen’) and Y Garn. Read More »

Long Compton

About a mile from the Rollright Stones, it was once it was said that ‘There are enough witches in Long Compton to draw a load of hay up Long Compton Hill.’ Roy Palmer in his 'The Folklore Of Warwickshire' gives the following brief account of account of someone contacting the D Read More »

Lordscairnie Castle

The castle has links with the legend of the more infamous Glamis Castle. Read More »

Marston Mortaine

The 14th century St Mary's church is unusual because it has a separate tower away from the main church. The tower was probably a means of refuge in Saxon times, either from flood or from attack. Read More »

Meon Hill, Lower Quinton

An Iron Age hill fort once stood upon Meon Hill and it has been suggested that man has lived there from the Stone Age, but it a legend concerning the formation of the hill that has attracted my attention. Read More »

The Longstone at Mottistone

Longstone at Mottistone

This impressive standing stone and its smaller recumbent companion, are believed to be all that is left of a chambered long barrow from the Neolithic period, the remaining stones once being part of the tomb entrance.   Read More »

Odell

Five black marks on the front porch of the church are said to have been left by the devil, who attacked the church trying to get Sir Roland Alstons. Sir Roland is said to have sold his immortal soul to the Devil and was seeking sanctuary when the time to hand it over had arrived.

The ghost of Sir Roland is said to appear at the church riding a black mount every 100 years. Read More »

Pluckley

Map of Pluckley, Kent

Often mooted as the most haunted village in England, this picturesque Kentish village is certainly steeped in ghost stories, whether based on actual sightings or just modern folklore. Its reputation as a ghost village is not without its problems and the village can be a magnet to thrill seekers and also those with a genuine interest in the paranormal, especially around Halloween. Read More »

Pont Aberglaslyn

Pont Aberglaslyn

Pont Aberglaslyn has a bridge with a connection to the Devil. It is very similar to other Devil and bridge related stories found throughout the British Isles. The Devil built the bridge on the understanding that he would receive the soul of the first living creature to cross over it. When the bridge was finished he went to the local inn to inform the magician Robin Ddu that it was ready. Read More »

Rhyd-y-Cae Bridge, Pentrefoelas

There is a legend associated with Rhyd-y-Cae Bridge where a local man was enticed into a game of cards with Satan himself. The following account of the story appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887). Read More »

River Monnow Bridge, Kentchurch

In 'The Folk-Lore of Herefordshire' (1912), Ella Mary Leather gave the following account of a bridge associated with the Devil. This bridge crosses the River Monnow which separates Gwent from Herefordshire. Read More »

The Rudston Monolith

Rudston Monolith

Standing in the Norman churchyard of All Saints Church, the Rudston Monolith is the highest standing stone in Great Britain at 7.6m (25ft) with a 5m circumference and an estimated weight of 40 Tonnes.

An experiment run by William Strickland in the 18th century suggests the stone may extend underground to a similar depth as it high above ground. Read More »

Ruthven Barracks

Ruthven Barracks 2

The castle that once stood on the site of the barracks, was said to be haunted by its notorious lord, who was trapped in limbo playing cards with the Devil.

Ruthven was first used as a Barracks in 1689. It was taken by force twice; once when the garrison surrendered to Bonnie Dundee, the other time being in 1746 when it was overrun by Jacobite troops. Read More »

Satan Appearing As A Lovely Maiden

A young man who was walking from Dyserth to Rhyl was overtaken by a lovely young lady dressed in white. She invited conversation, and they walked together awhile talking kindly, but, when they came opposite a pool on the road side she disappeared, in the form of a ball of fire, into the water. All that has reached our days, in corroboration of this tale, is the small pool. Read More »

Satan At Work Near Llanfihangel-y-Creuddyn

Elias Owen gives the following account of a series of disturbing experiences that befell a Sabbath breaker in his 1887 book ‘ Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales’. The account relates to the experiences of one William Davies and was given to Owen by the late Rev. J. L. Read More »

Satan Frightening A Man For Gathering Nuts On Sunday

In his 'Welsh-folklore' (1887) Elias Owen tells the following tale related to him by Rev. W. E. Jones, rector of Bylchau, near Denbigh:— Read More »

Satan Outwitted In Trefeglwys

The following account appeared in 'Y Brython', a popular Welsh-language periodical devoted to literature, antiquities and folklore published between 1858 and 1863. It was later reprinted in Elias Owen's 'Wesh Folkore' (1887). Read More »

Satan Playing Cards

The following story concerning the Devil playing cards appeared in Elias Owen's 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887)'. 'A good many years ago I travelled from Pentrevoelas to Yspytty in company with Mr. Read More »

Satan Playing Cards At A Merry Meeting

It was formerly a general custom in Wales for young lads and lasses to meet and spend a pleasant evening together in various farmhouses. Many kinds of amusements, such as dancing, singing, and card playing, were resorted to, while away the time. The Rev. Read More »

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