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Dyfed Gazetteer

A4076 Road Ghost

The following story of a 'Road Ghost' on the A4076 at Steynton appeared on Wales Online, 7 August 2011. Read More »

Alluring Stone

The following description of the Alluring Stone appeared in 'British Goblins' (1881) by Wirt Sykes. 'In Carmarthen are still to be found traces of a belief in the Alluring Stone, whose virtue is that it will cure hydrophobia. It is represented as a soft white stone, about the size of a man s head, originally found on a farm called Dysgwylfa, about twelve miles from Carmarthen town. Read More »

Bedd Arthur

The whole area around Dyfed is associated with Arthur, outlined in the old Welsh tales now part of the Mabinogion. This cairn on the hilltop is thought to be Arthur's Grave.

Directions: The grave is in the Prescely Mountains

Bedd-yr-Afanc

Bedd-yr-Afanc means the monsters grave, the Afanc being a name commonly given to a water monster in Wales. The grave is actually the only Bronze Age Gallery Grave in Wales and dates from around 1500BC. Just two rows of parallel stones survive. According to legend the Afanc used to dwell in a pool by Brynberian Bridge, and was captured and killed then buried in this mound on the hillside. Read More »

Black Calf Of Narberth

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) tells us of what may have been the ghost of an animal or as those in the North of England may refer to as a hairy ghost. However, this one, according to Sykes may have been something more sinister. Read More »

Bosherton Lake

The local lake is said to have been the body of water into which Arthur's sword Excalibur was cast after the battle of Cammlan.

Directions: A footpath from Bosherton leads to the lake Bosherton reached off the B4319 South of Pembroke

Bow Street Phantom Lancaster Bomber

Bow Street

There are a few cases of phantom aircraft still flying the skies of Britain and we were recently contacted by a witness called Doug about a ghostly Lancaster Bomber seen in the early 1960’s. Read More »

Broad Haven

Broad Haven was the scene of a UFO flap during the late 1970's. There were several reported sightings; the most widely publicised was the strange visitation to a field near to Broad Haven primary school in February 1977. Read More »

Bryn Myrddin (Merlin's Hill)

The hill is one of many places in Britain reputed to be the prison of Merlin, where Merlin lies asleep in a cave awaiting the call to return and help his fellow countrymen. According to tradition it is possible to hear his groans from under the hill if you listen hard enough. In legend Merlin was born in Carmarthen 2 miles away from the hill. Read More »

Bryn Terrace, Llanelli

According to 'Phantoms Legends, Customs and Superstitions Of The Sea' (1972) by Raymond Lamont Brown; 'In 1955 Jack Rees was a 26-year-old steel erector employed at Carmarthen Bay Power Station. At the time of his brush with this phantom he was living at a house in Bryn Terrace, Llanelly with his 23-year-old wife and son of seven. Read More »

Carreg Cennen Castle

The ruined castle has a wishing well, which had the ability to heal eye and ear disorders. The well is reached via an underground tunnel that leads to a cave. Traditionally one had to leave a pin in its waters and then make the wish. Prehistoric skeletons have also been uncovered from within this cave, and it is likely that it was used in ancient times as a place of reverence. Read More »

Clegyr Boia

This rocky hilltop was occupied during the Neolithic period around 3800BC, when there were a number of rectangular houses on the summit. During the Iron Age the hill was fortified and served as a hillfort. A rampart, which can still be seen today, was completed around the hill with an entrance towards the Southwest. Read More »

Devil Summoning Tailor of Glanbran

The 18th century Glanbran House was dismantled around 1930 and was the ancestral home of the Gwynne family, the descendants of David Goch Gwyn who settled at Glanbran in the 16th century. Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins: Welsh Folk-Lore, Fairy Mythology, Legends and Traditions (1881) gives the following story in which an unnamed member of the Gwynne family plays a prominent part. Read More »

Ellyllon

According to 'British Goblins' (1881) by Wirt Sykes; 'The Ellyllon are the pigmy elves who haunt the groves and valleys, and correspond pretty closely with the English elves. Read More »

Freni-Fawr

This mountain has long been associated with the fairies and is traditionally an entrance to the other world.

Directions: To the West of Crymych

Gors-Fawr Stone Circle

The circle consists of 16 standing stones with a diameter of 22.3 metres, 72 feet. Towards the Northeast of the circle are two outlying standing stones. It is not clear whether they are related to the circle and may date from an earlier or later timescale.

Directions: Off a minor road from the A478, signposted

Green Bridge Cave

The cave is associated with the common legend that a fiddler (sometimes a piper in other stories) went in to the cave to play and never returned, perhaps crossing through to the fair realm. His music is still said to be heard now and again from the depths of the cave.

Directions: Pendine is reached from the A4066

Haunted Wales: A Guide To Welsh Ghostlore by Richard Holland

Haunted Wales

The ghosts of Wales are bold and memorable, forceful in character often terrifying and sometimes even dangerous. In a new book by Richard Holland and published by The History Press you realise that Wales is a fearfully haunted place with possibly more ghosts and goblins than in England or any other country. Read More »

John Jenkin Devil Summoner

Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) gives the following account of a devil summoning ceremony performed by a schoolmaster and renowned conjurer named John Jenkin in Pembrokeshire. Read More »

Laugharne

A spectral dog known as the Gwyllgi or the 'Dog of Darkness' is said to haunt the town. The dog appears with flaming red eyes, and is said to run from the castle to the town along an old route-way.

Directions: On the A4066

Llanarth Church

Llanarth church is associated with a legend of the Devil; unusually the Devil creeps into the church and tries to steal one of the church bells. (It is more common for him to steal the whole church). In the process of his theft he wakes the vicar who challenges him with the name of Christ. Eventually the Devil concedes, and jumps off the church tower. Read More »

Llanfihangel Geneu'r Glyn Parish Church

The following legend concerning Llanfihangel Church was give to Elias Owen by Rev. J Felix, vicar of Cilcen, near Mold and subsequently published in his 'Welsh folk-lore' (1887). Read More »

Llech Lafar, St Davids

Llech Lafar, a speaking slab of marble by the River Alun is referred to by Wirt Sykes in his ‘British Goblins’ (1881). 'The Talking Stone Llechlafar, or stone of loquacity, served as a bridge over the river Alyn, bounding the churchyard of St. David s in Pembrokeshire, on the northern side. Read More »

Llyn Llech Owain (The Lake of Owen's Flag)

Folklore suggests that this lake was created when a well overflowed on Mynydd Mawr. The well keeper was a man called Owain (Owen), and one day after letting his horse drink from the cool waters, he forgot to replace the large stone slab that capped the well. Read More »

Milford Haven

The following accounts appeared in ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain by John Ingram (1897). Read More »

Nanteos Mansion

Nanteos means the valley of the nightingale, and is a Georgian mansion house built for Thomas Powell in 1739. Read More »

Ogaf Myrddin

Ogaf Myrddin means Merlin's Cave, and this is one of the locations where he is said to sleep awaiting his release. The cave is hidden behind a waterfall.

Directions: Northwest of Brechfa

Pentre Ifan

Pentre Ifan

This is one of the most recognisable chambered cairns in Wales, with a huge capstone supported by the points of 3 upright stones. Read More »

Pistyll Teilo

This pool and waterfall lie in a ravine below an old ruined curch dedicated to St Teilo (Capel Teilo). The water from the waterfall has long been thought to have healing properties, it was said to heal bruises and other ailments including rheumatism and sprains. All you had to do was hold the affected part in the main stream of icy water for a short while. Read More »

Pwyll, Lord of Dyfed

The story of Pwyll is found in the Mabinogion, a collection of old Welsh stories translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, and published in 1849. It describes how Pwyll the Lord of Dyfed meets the underworld king Arawn and how the two become close allies. Read More »

Roch Castle

According to folklore Adam De La Roche, a Norman landowner was told by a local wise woman that he would die by the bite of an adder, but he could escape the prophesy if he managed to get through a predicted year in safety. He built Roch Castle (which dates from the 13th century) on the volcanic outcrop so that it was far above the surrounding landscape. Read More »

Sarn Gynfelyn

Sarn Cynfelin (Saint Cynfelyn’s Causeway) is the southern most of the three Cardigan Bay sarnau, and begins just below the farmhouse at Wallog, situated on the cliffs between Borth and Clarach, and it extends for fourteen kilometres offshore into Cardigan Bay. Approximately half way along its length, it is bisected by a channel which is about five metres deep. Read More »

Satan At Work Near Llanfihangel-y-Creuddyn

Elias Owen gives the following account of a series of disturbing experiences that befell a Sabbath breaker in his 1887 book ‘ Welsh folk-lore: a collection of the folk-tales and legends of North Wales’. The account relates to the experiences of one William Davies and was given to Owen by the late Rev. J. L. Read More »

Sing Sorrow Sorrow edited by Gwen Davies

Sing Sorrow Sorrow

‘Sing Sorrow Sorrow is a chilling collection of supernatural myth and otherworldly horror stories from some of Wales' most exciting new and established authors. Read More »

Sir David Llwyd of Yspythi Ystwyth

The village of Ysbyty Ystwyth is thought to have been the property of the Knights Hospitallier ( Order of the Knights of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem) and also, maybe the home of one of Wales infamous magicians. Read More »

St Canna's Church, Llangan

The current church is thought to have been on the site of the original chapel founded by St Canna. It was rebuilt in 1820, but many references from the late 19th century refer to it as being dilapidated and unused. I am unsure of its recent history at the moment but what I am interested in is a legend attached to its construction. Read More »

St Canna's Stone (aka St Canna's Chair) & Fynnon Ganna (Canna's Holy Well)

St Canna (Born 510AD) founded churches at both Llangan and Llanganna, though she is thought to have maintained her residence at Llangan (Llang-gan) in Carmarthenshire (not to be confused with Llangan in the Vale of Glamorgan). It is here in Llangan that we find her church and records of a holy well and a cubical shaped stone inscribed with the name 'Carina' that were associated with the saint. Read More »

St Govan's Chapel

This tiny chapel hidden in a deep ravine in the rocks dates from the thirteenth century. There may have been a chapel or religious structure here in the fifth century making it one of the earliest places of Christian worship. It has been suggested that the chapel was part of a larger Hermitage but its history is unclear. Read More »

St Non's Chapel and St David's Peninsula

St David's Peninsula is supposedly the landing place of Twrch Trwyth, the magical boar told in the story of Culhwch and Olwen in the Mabinogion, King Arthur features heavily in the story. It is also the place where St Patrick is said to have sailed for Ireland to convert them to Christianity. Read More »

Strata Florida Abbey

The abbey was founded in early part of the 13th century by the Cistercian monks, and was one of the grandest in Wales at its height. It was seen as a centre of education and political activity. The abbey was destroyed during the reformation. Read More »

The A44 WWII Phantom Bomber

A WWII phantom bomber has been seen by independent witnesses on separate occasions whilst driving on the A44, probably in the vicinity of Eisteddfa Gurig Farm at the base of Pumlumon 2,467ft. The aircraft flies silently and low to the ground as if it is going to crash into a hill. Read More »

The Aberystwyth Mermaid

The story of the Aberystwyth Mermaid was published after 1826, written in Welsh. The general abbreviated story is outlined below. Read More »

The Beast of Bont

Responsible for killing around fifty sheep centred on the village of Pontrhydfendigaid in 1995, the ‘Beast of Bont’ is the most feared mysterious predator in Wales. Expert vets that examined the carcasses said the animal that caused the damage was more powerful than a fox or dog. Many people believe the beast to be a large cat, such as a puma or leopard. Read More »

The Boar’s Head

Boars Head Hotel

The Boar’s Head pub on Queen’s Road in Aberystwyth, is a derelict building at the time of writing, but is probably going to be converted into flats in the future, now the squatters have been evicted. Read More »

The Devils Bridge

Devils Bridge

There are three bridges over this part of the Mynach Gorge, each one built successively over the others, as they needed to be improved for traffic. The lowest of the bridges dating from the 11th century is the original one and is associated with a Devil legend that is common in Britain with minor variations from place to place. Read More »

The Dylan Thomas Boat House

The Dylan Thomas Boat House is found in Laugharne, set at the foot of a cliff overlooking the Tâf estuary. Dylan Marlais Thomas (Born 27 October 1914 – Died 9 November 1953) lived in the house between 1949 and 1953 with his family. It is now a shrine to poet, and a popular tourist attraction for Carmarthenshire County Council receiving around 15,000 visitors a year. Read More »

The Promenade Ghosts

Aberystwyth Promenade

In the 1960′s a young couple tragically drowned after becoming trapped by the high tide and rocks at the end of the promenade at the foot of Constitution Hill in Aberystwyth. The following account is from Phil Bishop and his wife who saw what might have been the ghosts of this couple whilst they were holidaying in Aberystwyth during 1971. Read More »

The Thirteen Treasures of the Island of Britain

These treasures are ancient magical items of Welsh tradition that are mentioned in 15th and 16th Century manuscripts. Most of the treasures are from and in ‘The North’ of the Island of Britain. Read More »

The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places. Read More »

Trefal Stone

The following article by Nick Dermody about the Trefal Stone appeared on the BBC Wales website on 24 May 2012.

'Archaeologists are to exhume and analyse human bones found under a prehistoric monument only recently identified as a burial site cap. Read More »

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