You are hereMysterious World

Mysterious World


Sylvan Lake Crash?

The following article entitled 'Did something crash in Sylvan Lake on Monday? Authorities in Forest Lake say they don't know' appeared on the Forest Lake Times website on Tuesday 28 Jult 2009.  It was written by staff writer Jennifer Larson. Read More »

Te Hokioi

The following article by Paul Rodgers entitled 'Maori legend of man-eating bird is true' appears on The Independent's website and is dated 14 September 2009.

Creature that features in New Zealand folklore really existed, scientists say. Read More »

The Altar Cup in Aagerup (Ågerup)

The following folk-tale appeared in Thomas Keightley's 'The Fairy Mythology: Illustrative of the Romance and Superstition of Various Countries' (1850). 'Between the villages of Marup and Aagerup in Zealand, there is said to have lain a great castle, the ruins of which are still to be seen near the strand. Read More »

The Bannockburn

Bannockburn

In the days before the Edmund Fitzgerald, the Bannockburn was one of the most famous ships to mysteriously vanish on the Great Lakes. She's one of the more commonly sighted ghost ships of the lakes, often seen struggling through the November storms, a victim of the Witch of November. Read More »

The Dancing Ghost of Grancer Harrison

William "Grancer" Harrison (1789-1860) was a successful plantation owner. He had the largest number of slaves in Coffee County. His nickname derives from "Grand-Sir" which he was called by the slaves. He was renowned as somewhat fun-loving man who loved dancing and feasting and would hold dances every Saturday. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge At Lake Galenbeck

Karl Bartsch gave the following Devil bridge story in his 'Tales and legends and traditions of Mecklenburg' (Sagen, Märchen und Gebräuche aus Meklenburg) published in 1879. Read More »

The Double-headed Snake of Newbury

The following poem was wrote by John Greenleaf Whittier (1807 - 1892)

Far away in the twilight time
Of every people, in every clime,
Dragons and griffins and monsters dire,
Born of water, and air, and fire,
Or nursed, like the Python, in the mud
And ooze of the old Deucalion flood,
Crawl and wriggle and foam with rage, Read More »

The Dwarfs In Schalk Mountain And Wohlden Mountain

Schalk Mountain (Schalksberg), between Ettenbüttel and Wilsche, near Gilde on the Aller River, is only a little mole hill today, but formerly it was a high and narrow mountain in which the dwarf people made their home. Read More »

The Giants From The West

According to James Mooney in his 'Myths Of The Cherokee’ (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) 'James Wafford*, of the western Cherokee, who was born in Georgia in 1806, says that his grandmother, who must have been born about the middle of the last century, told him that she had beard from the old people that long before her time a party of g Read More »

The Girl Who Was Killed by Jews

It is a sad fact that many legends across Europe are Anti-Semitic. The following legend is from Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's Deutsche Sagen (1816/1818). Read More »

The Godmother

Two girls, all dressed up, were walking along playfully and mischievously one evening when suddenly a gigantic fat toad waddled across their path. The girls joked about the large animal: One of them said that if it ever had a baby, she would be its godmother. The other one quickly added that she would cook for the occasion. Read More »

The Great Leech Of Tlanusi'yï

The following legend is taken from ‘Myths Of The Cherokee’ by James Mooney (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) ’The spot where Valley river joins Hiwassee, at Murphy, in North Carolina, is known among the Cherokees as Tlanusi'yï, "The Leech place," and this is the story they tell of it: Read More »

The Great New England Vampire Panic

Over the last few weeks I have been adding articles about some of the vampires found throughout New England that were associated with tuberculosis deaths. Read More »

The Great Yellow-Jacket: Origin Of Fish And Frogs

A long time ago the people of the old town of Kanu'ga`lâ'yï ("Brier place," or Briertown), on Nantahala river, in the present Macon county, North Carolina, were much annoyed by a great insect called U'la`gû', as large as a house, which used to come from some secret hiding place, and darting swiftly through the air, would snap up children from their play and carry the Read More »

The Griffin

The Griffin

The Griffin, built in 1679 was one of the first ships to sail on the Great Lakes and was used by the French Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle ( 22 November 1643 – 19 March 1687), to explore that part of Northern America. Read More »

The Haunted Whirlpool

At the mouth of Suck creek, on the Tennessee, about 8 miles below Chattanooga, is a series of dangerous whirlpools, known as "The Suck," and noted among the Cherokee as the place where Ûñtsaiyï', the gambler, lived long ago. Read More »

The Horror of Gyb Farm edited by Richard Holland

Gyb Farm

Within this book, The Horror of Gyb Farm, Richard Holland has collated and edited the works of a pioneering and yet relatively unknown paranormal researcher, Frederick George Lee (born 1832-1902). Between 1875 and 1894 F.G. Read More »

The Hunter In The Däkwä'

In the old days there was a great fish called the Däkwä', which lived in Tennessee river where Toco creek comes in at Däkwä', the "Däkwä' place," above the mouth of Tellico, and which was so large that it could easily swallow a man. Read More »

The Jews' Stone

Judenstein

I am never quite sure what to make of the hateful anti-Semitic folk tales found throughout Europe and to whether to brush them aside, pretending they do not exist, or post them in a hope that people can learn from the mistakes of the past. Read More »

The Lady in the Mask

The story was all over the news. A beautiful young woman, married only a few months had been suffering terribly at the hands of her husband. He was an aggressive drunkard and during one of his fits of temper he had cut both of her cheeks, ear to ear, with a pair of scissors. Read More »

The Lapland Clergyman's Wife who was Midwife to a Troll

According to ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891) by Edwin Sidney Hartland ‘A clergyman's wife in Swedish Lappmark, the cleverest midwife in all Sweden, was summoned one fine summer's evening to attend a mysterious being of Troll race and great might, called Vitra. At this unusual call she took counsel with her husband, who, however, deemed it best for her to go. Read More »

The Lions

The two peaks known as The Lions are one of Vancouver's most recognizable landmarks measuring 5400ft (West Lion) and 5269ft (East Lion). Named Ch'ich'iyúy Elxwíkn (Twin Sisters) by the indigenous Squamish people, the peaks represent two Squamish sisters who marred Haida men and created a peace between the two nations. Read More »

The Nest Of The Tlä'nuwä

On the north bank of Little Tennessee river, in a bend below the mouth of Citico creek, in Blount county, Tennessee, is a high cliff hanging over the water, and about half way up the face of the rock is a cave with two openings. The rock projects outward above the cave, so that the mouth can not be seen from above, and it seems impossible to reach the cave either from above or below. Read More »

The Nûñnë'hï And Other Spirit Folk

According to ‘Myths Of The Cherokee’ by James Mooney (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.), The Knob, which is a name for the Big Pinnacle on Pilot Mountain (standing 2421 feet) was one of the homes of the Nûñnë'hï. Read More »

The Servant Girl And The Elves

Once upon a time there was a poor servant girl who was diligent and neat. Every day she swept out the house and shook the sweepings onto a large pile outside the door. One morning just as she was beginning her work she found a letter on the pile of sweepings. She could not read, so she stood her broom in the corner and took the letter to her employers. Read More »



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site