You are hereNorth America

North America


Ambrose Bierce Disappearance

I love reading horror stories and one of my favourite writers was Ambrose Bierce. As a Mexican-American I've always been very intrigued by him because Bierce (an American writer) disappeared mysteriously in Mexico in 1913. I have written a little about his disappearance below. Read More »

Atagâ'hï, The Enchanted Lake

Westward from the headwaters of Oconaluftee river, in the wildest depths of the, Great Smoky mountains, which form the line between North Carolina and Tennessee, is the enchanted lake of Atagâ'hï, "Gall place." Although all the Cherokee know that it is there, no one has ever seen it, for the way is so difficult that only the animals know how to reach it. Read More »

Consumption Vine, Dummerston

Tuberculosis has been known by various names throughout history, phthisis, scrofula, Pott's disease, white plague and of course, consumption. There are several cases throughout New England where a fear of the disease and the lack of medical knowledge to treat it, led to people seeking a supernatural explanation and a cure in old folklore. Read More »

East 9th Street, Gravesend

On 15 August 2012 the New York Daily News featured the following story by Mark Morales entitled ‘Gravesend woman’s sci-fi tale about living in a haunted house featured in SyFy reality show’. Read More »

El Pipila

A poor Nahuatl Indian boy was born in the countryside near the city of San Luis Potosi in Guanjuato state sometime around the year 1790. The unfortunate child was born with hideous deformities which gave him a peculiar walk and ensured he was picked on by others in the community. Read More »

Gadsden Hotel, Douglas

The following article entitled 'Ghosts said to mingle with guests at haunted Arizona hotel' by Tim Gaynor of Reuters appeared on the Canadian CNEWS website on 31 October 2012 Read More »

Gay Street, West Village

I came across the following short article by Victor Epstein and Christina Boyle entitled 'Gutted West Village building said to be haunted by restless ghost of Gay St. man is now up for sale'. It dates from 14 October 2009 and appeared in the New York Daily News. Read More »

Government House and the Apparition of Major Blomberg to the Governor of Dominica

Since 1978 Government House has been the home of the President of Dominica. It was commissioned by Sir William Young, 1st Baronet (Born 1724/5 – Died 1788), who was the first British Governor of Dominica, sworn in on 17 November 1770. There is a story about the Sir William Young being visited the ghost of Major Blomberg in his residence in Dominica. Read More »

Hanged Slave, Suck Creek

There is a story that an escaping Slave ran from his master who lived in Suck Creek and fled along what is now known as the Cumberland Trail. He was chased, caught and severely beaten, before being hung on a tree. They must have misjudged the hanging though as the story relates he survived. Unfortunately his slave master returned to the tree and found that the slave had again escaped. Read More »

Jewett City Vampires

The following article by Megan Baird entitled 'In 1854, vampire panic struck Connecticut town' was published in the Register Citizen on 2 November 2008.  

GRISWOLD, Conn. (AP) — In May of 1854, the Ray family of Jewett City was frantic. Read More »

La Llorona, The Weeping Woman

Stories of La Llorona, the weeping woman are told all over the Hispanic world, with versions coming from Venezuela to Spain and from California to Puerto Rico, but the legend is perhaps most associated with Mexico. The tales differ slightly from place to place but the basic elements are always the same. Read More »

La Planchada of Mexico City's Hospital Juarez

Beginning in the 1930s, many doctors at Mexico City's Hospital Juarez began reporting a mysterious improvement in the condition of some of their patients. When asked about these miraculous recoveries the patients all claimed to have been visited in the night by a nurse in an immaculately ironed but quite old fashioned uniform. Read More »

Lake Ronkonkoma

Legend has it that Ronkonkoma Lake on Long Island is haunted by a female ghost who takes a male life every year. Read More »

Mary Lena Brown, Chestnut Hill Baptist Church Cemetery

Rhode Island has a few cases that were by some considered to involve vampires. One of these suspected vampires was Mercy Lena Brown who died of consumption (tuberculosis) on 18 January 1892, aged 19. Read More »

Nancy Levi New England Vampire

The Foster town records dated 14 October 1892 give the following account of the case of Nancy Levi who was died of consumption on 6 April 1827 but was subsequently exhumed and burned in a belief that this could prevent further deaths of the disease in her family. Read More »

Nûñ'yunu'wï, The Stone Man

This is what the old men told me when I was a boy. Once when all the people of the settlement were out in the mountains on a great hunt one man who had gone on ahead climbed to the top of a high ridge and found a large river on the other side. Read More »

Our Lord of the Poison‏

There once lived a man named Don Fermin Azueta who was much admired and respected throughout Mexico City for his piety, kindly nature and gentle spirit. He was a wealthy man who used his money for helping the poor of the city and his philanthropy became legendary. Read More »

Pfister Hotel, Milwaukee

The Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee was originally opened in 1893 by Guido and Charles Pfister, and according to the following Stacey Pressman article entitled 'The haunting of MLB's A-List',  a number of American baseball players seem to have had some strange experiences there. Read More »

Pickens County Courthouse

A mysterious and ghostly tale is told about the Pickens County Courthouse in Carrollton, Alabama. It concerns a supposedly innocent man being lynched, the evidence of which is still there for all to see today. Read More »

Rachel Burton (nee Harris), Vampire of Manchester

Captain Isaac Burton and Rachel Harris (stepdaughter of Esquire Powel) married on March 8, 1789. Unfortunately the marriage did not last long and she died of consumption (Tubercolosis) on 1 February 1790, after which she was considered by some to have become a vampire. Read More »

The Abuela's Skeleton

A poor family once lived close to Lago de Patzcuaro, farming beans, corn and squash. There was a wife, her husband, her mother and her small son. The boy was especially fond of his grandmother (abuela) and he was the apple of her eye. They would often pick wildflowers together or go down to the lake shore and watch the boats on the water. Read More »

The Dancing Ghost of Grancer Harrison

William "Grancer" Harrison (1789-1860) was a successful plantation owner. He had the largest number of slaves in Coffee County. His nickname derives from "Grand-Sir" which he was called by the slaves. He was renowned as somewhat fun-loving man who loved dancing and feasting and would hold dances every Saturday. Read More »

The Giants From The West

According to James Mooney in his 'Myths Of The Cherokee’ (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) 'James Wafford*, of the western Cherokee, who was born in Georgia in 1806, says that his grandmother, who must have been born about the middle of the last century, told him that she had beard from the old people that long before her time a party of g Read More »

The Great Leech Of Tlanusi'yï

The following legend is taken from ‘Myths Of The Cherokee’ by James Mooney (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) ’The spot where Valley river joins Hiwassee, at Murphy, in North Carolina, is known among the Cherokees as Tlanusi'yï, "The Leech place," and this is the story they tell of it: Read More »

The Great New England Vampire Panic

Over the last few weeks I have been adding articles about some of the vampires found throughout New England that were associated with tuberculosis deaths. Read More »



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site