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Witchcraft


Richard The Tailor Of Langattock Crickhowell

The town of Crickhowell and the village of Langattock face each other over the River Usk. Wirt Sykes in his ‘British Goblins’ (1881) recounts the following story of a gentleman called Walter Jones being taught a lesson by a local inn keeper thought to dabble in witchcraft. Read More »

Ruth Osborn, Thomas Colley and the Black Dog

The following story from ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales (1890)’ by Edwin Sidney Hartland concerns a Black Dog that haunted the site of a gibbet in which the body of a witch killer was displayed. Read More »

Salem Village Parsonage (1692)

Samuel Parris

Salem Village (now Danvers) was settled by European farmers from nearby Salem Town in the 1630's becoming a separate parish in 1672. The Parsonage dated from 1681, and from 1689 when the covenant church was established it was the home of English born Rev Samuel Parris (born 1653 – died 27 February 1720), his family and household slaves. Read More »

Sir David Llwyd of Yspythi Ystwyth

The village of Ysbyty Ystwyth is thought to have been the property of the Knights Hospitallier ( Order of the Knights of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem) and also, maybe the home of one of Wales infamous magicians. Read More »

Spynie Palace

Spynie Palace

Spynie Palace was the seat of the bishops of Moray for over 500 years; the atmospheric ruins now a shell of its former glory. The Palace - like many old historical buildings - has its share of traditions and ghost stories. Read More »

The British Witch: The Biography by Peter Maxwell-Stuart

The British Witch

For over five hundred years witches, male and female, practised magic for harm and good in their communities.  Most witches worked locally, used by their neighbours to cure illness, create love, or gratify personal spite against another. Read More »

The Initiate: Journal of Traditional Studies - Issue 2

The Initiate Vol 2

In his editorial David J. Wingfield expressed his hopes that 'The Initiate' would become a forum to discuss the nature of tradition in a quasi-academic context. Well I think he is on the right path and I certainly found all the articles to be both fascinating and thought provoking.
Read More »

The Lamb Inn

The Lamb Inn

Demolished in 1905, The Lamb Inn became a centre of attention during the 18th century with an investigated and well reported poltergeist like haunting that lasted over a year. The Lamb Inn dated from 1651 and stood between Gloucester Land and Lawford Street. There is I believe nothing remaining of the old building now. Read More »

The Tea Set Of Lizzie Baty, Brampton Witch

The following article entitled ‘Cumbrian witch's cursed tea set promises disaster for new owners’ appeared in the Cumberland News on Friday 10 December 2010. It concerns a legacy left by Lizzie Baty (The Brampton Witch) in the 19th century. Read More »

The Wise Woman Of Littondale

The following legend of 'The Wise Woman Of Littondale' appeared in 'The Table Book' (1827) by William Hone (Born 3 June 1780 – Died 8 November 1842) and partially reprinted in ‘Yorkshire Legends and Traditions’ by Rev Thomas Parkinson (1888). Read More »

The Witch Of Laggan

A hero celebrated for his hatred of witchcraft, was warming himself in his hunting hut, in the forest of Gaick, in Badenoch. His faithful hounds, fatigued with the morning chase, lay stretched on the turf by his side,--his gun, that would not miss, reclined in the neuk of the bothy,--the skian dhu of the sharp edge hung by his side, and these alone constituted his company. Read More »

The Witches Of Delnabo

IN the time of my grandmother, the farm of Delnabo was proportionally divided between three tenants. Read More »

Upper Denton

The local church made from the distinctive stones taken from Hadrian's Wall dates back to Saxon times. The churchyard holds the grave of Margaret Teasdale who died aged ninety-eight in 1777. Items found in her home after her death led the locals to believe she had an interest in the occult and she has been regarded as a witch since then.

Ursula Kemp and the St Osyth’s Witches

Ursula Kemp

In Chelmsford, 1582, fourteen women from St Osyth were put on trial. The charge was witchcraft. Ten of those women faced charges of 'bewitching to death'. Seperate skeletons found in St Osyth during 1921 were thought to belong to two of these women, executed as witches. Read More »

When Witches Communed With Fairies

Magic Cirle

Our modern conventions tend to view the realms of fairies and witches separately. Witches have been viewed as evil, while fairies are seen as benevolent, cute, and kind. As scholars reevaluate witch trials and the confessions of those accused, we are coming to new conclusions on accused witches. Read More »

Who Put Bella in the Wych Elm?

Wych Elm

On 18th April 1943 four Stourbridge teenagers, Fred Payne, Tommy Willetts, Robert Hart and Bob Farmer discovered the remains of a woman inside a hollow Wych Elm (also known as Scots (Scotch) Elm or Ulmus glabra) in Hagley Wood. It has been suggested that ritualistic magic or even wartime espionage may have been behind this murder mystery that after sixty years is still a focus of interest. Read More »

Wilden and Ravensden

On a minor road between Wilden and Ravensden a strange figure dressed in black has been seen in broad daylight.

The figure has been identified as a witch with a malevolent character.

Directions: The haunted road is a minor road off the B660 between Ravensden and Wilden

Witch's Cottage, Barley

In December 2011 a 17th century cottage complete with an entombed mummified cat was unearthed in Barley, near Pendle Hill, an area which is of course famous for the Pendle Witches. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1542

The Bill ayest conjuraracons & wichecraftes and sorcery and enchantmants. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1547

An Acte for the Repeale of certain Statutes, etc. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1563

An Act agaynst Conjuracons Inchantments and Witchecraftes. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1580

An Acte against sedicious Wordes and Rumours uttered againste the queenes moste excellent Majestie. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1604

An Acte against conjuration Witchcrafte and dealinge with evill and wicked Spirits. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1763

An Act to repeal the Statute made in the First Year of the Reign of King James the First, intituled, An Act against Conjuration, Witchcraft, and dealing with evil and wicked Spirits, except so much thereof as repeals an Act of the Fifth Year of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, Against Conjurations, Inchantments, and Witchcrafts, and to repeal an Act passed in the Parliament of Scotland in the Nint Read More »

Witchcraft In Middleton

Major General Ralph Assheton

Around 1630 a man named Utley, presumably from Middleton was accused of witchcraft, tried at Lancaster, found guilty and hanged. It was thought that he had bewitched to death Richard Assheton (before 1625 – 1630), first son of Sir Ralph Assheton Esq, Lord of Middleton and his wife Elizabeth Kaye. Read More »

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