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Outer Hebrides


Butt of Lewis

A sea monster was reputedly sighted in 1882. Another sea monster was reported in 1895, a few days after a similar creature was seen off Bernera. This creature was supposedly 120' long.

Eye Of Lewis

A geological feature created through coastal erosion, the Eye of Lewis is a hole through an outcrop of rock. Local legend suggests that a giant used a hook and this hole to enable him to draw the Isle of Lewis to it's current location. This tale was passed on through word of mouth and if anybody knows any other details of this folk tale then we would love to hear more. Read More »

Great Bernera

In 1895 a sea monster described as having a 15' neck is reputed to have been seen off Great Bernera. This is also the year that whaling began in North Harris, leading to the establishment of a whaling station by 1907.

Hartavagh Bay Sheiling

In 'Tales From Old Barra, Told by the Coddy' (1960) (John MacPherson, Northbay, Barra, 1876 · 1955) a haunted ruined sheiling at Hartavagh Bay is mentioned. Here some fishermen would spent the night whilst out on fishing trips. Read More »

Loch Urabhal

Loch Uravel or Urabhal in Gaelic is a small body of water roughly 2 miles north of Achmore. On 27 July 1961 two teachers fishing at the loch had a strange experience. Thirty five metres from their boat they reputedly saw a two headed, single humped creature swim by.

Santraigh

THERE was a herd's wife in the island of Sanntraigh, and she had a kettle. A woman of peace would come every day to seek the kettle. She would not say a word when she came, but she would catch hold of the kettle. When she would catch the kettle, the woman of the house would say--

"A smith is able to make
Cold iron hot with coal.
The due of a kettle is bones, Read More »

Santraigh

THERE was a herd's wife in the island of Sanntraigh, and she had a kettle. A woman of peace would come every day to seek the kettle. She would not say a word when she came, but she would catch hold of the kettle. When she would catch the kettle, the woman of the house would say--

"A smith is able to make
Cold iron hot with coal. Read More »

Searrach Uisge

The creature, possibly a water horse of Loch Suainbhal is referred to as the Searrach Uisge. The creature was said to inhabit the loch for over a century and in the nineteenth century it was described as being like an capsized boat when it was seen swimming around. Another description has it being forty foot long and eel like. Read More »

The Blobster of the Isle of Benbeculla

In the early 1990’s a twelve foot carcass covered in sand and seaweed was discovered on a Benbecula beach by 16 year old Louise Whitts. Read More »

The Isle Of Pabaidh

THERE came a woman of peace (a fairy) the way of the house of a man in the island of Pabaidh, and she had the hunger of motherhood on her. He gave her food, and that went well with her. She stayed that night. Read More »

Uist Spectre Ship

Raymond Lamont Brown gives the following account of a ghost ship in his 'Phantoms Legends, Customs and Superstitions Of The Sea (1972)'. 'Spectre ships have been long seen on the coast of Uist (Outer Hebrides, Inverness, Scotland)', and one particular story was often related by Shony Campbell (Seonaidh Caimbeul)* the famous storyteller and Gaelic poet. Read More »

Werewolves of Loch Langavat

According to folklore, a family of werewolves used to live on an island on Loch Langavat. The story suggests that the now dead werewolves would return should their graves be found and disturbed.

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

Ellie and Katie along with their staff have created a warm and friendly pub with a traditional feel and traditional values. They have worked hard to turn the Dolphin into one of the safest, cleanest and most welcoming pubs around. Between them they have nearly 30 years experience in the pub and catering trade. Read More »



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