Liverpool Street Underground Railway Station

Receiving roughly 123 million visitors per annum, Liverpool Street Station is considered to be the third busiest station in the United Kingdom. It is built on the site once occupied by the original Bethlem Royal Hospital (Bedlam) and is reputedly haunted by an ex-patient of the infamous asylum.

St Batholomew the Great Parish Church

Founded in 1123 by Rahere, a jester/minstrel in the court of King Henry I (1068 – 1 December 1135), making this one of the oldest churches in London. Originally established as an Augustinian Priory Church, its nave was demolished in 1539 when King Henry VIII ordered the Dissolution of the Monastery’s.

St Botolph’s Church without Bishopgate

In 1982 Chris Brackley took a famous photograph whilst he was in St Botolph’s Church. The photograph was of the interior of the church, taking in the aisle, altar and main stain glass window. In the upper right hand side of picture there appears to be ghostly image of a figure dressed in period costume in the Choir Loft.

Aldgate Underground Railway Station

Aldgate Railway Station which serves the Circle Line and Metropolitan Line opened on 18 November 1876 and is said to have been built on a Plague Pit where hundreds of victims of the Bubonic Plague of 1665 were buried. Daniel Dafoe mentions this ‘terrible pit’ in the churchyard of the Parish of Aldgate in his ‘A Journal of the Plague Year’ published 1722*.

St James’s Church Garlickhythe

St James’s Church Garlickhythe is an ancient church that was destroyed during the Great Fire of London of September 1666 and rebuilt by Sir Christopher Wren (opening on 10 December 1682, though the tower was not finished until 1717).

Bank Underground Railway Station

The Bank-Monument Station complex is comprised of the two interlinked underground stations of Bank and Monument. The complex is the eighth busiest station on the London Underground network and it serves the Waterloo & City Line, Central Line, Northern Line, Circle Line, District Line and the Docklands Light Railway.

The Parish Church of St Michael, Cornhill

St Michaels’ Church in Cornhill is a Grade I listed building, built by Sir Christopher Wren between 1699 and 1672 following the destruction of the earlier medieval church in the Great Fire of London. It was in this now lost medieval building that according to legend a creature was encountered by the bell ringers early in the first half of the sixteenth century.

Old London Bridge

Around the area where the old London Bridge stood there is a tradition that ghostly cries for help can be heard as if people are drowning in the River Thames. This dates back to a dark time in English history and the cries are thought to be those of a group of Jews that were tricked by a ships captain in 1290.

The Bank of England and The Black Nun

The Bank of England on Threadneedle Street is sometimes referred to as ‘The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street’ and is reputedly haunted by the apparition of Sarah Whitehead, also known as ‘The Black Nun’.

Alice Hackney and St.Mary-at-Hill

St Mary-at-Hill is a Grade I listed building on Lovat Lane. The founding of the church dates from 12th century though it has been rebuilt and renovated many times since then. It was during one period of renovation that it became linked with Alice Hackney who’s body was found preserved after being buried for nearly two hundred years. Alice also reputedly haunts the church still.