Hull Christmas Traditions

According to ‘County Folk-Lore Volume VI – Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ edited by Eliza Glutch. ‘On Christmas morning in Hull the children come in droves, pealing at your door-bell in order to wish you "a merry Christmas." The following is a favourite doggerel:

Church of St. Andrew, Bugthorpe

It has been suggested that burying someone face down is a sign of disrespect for the deceased and a way to possibly humiliate them. One such burial may have taken place in Bugthorpe (or Buckthorpe) Churchyard according to Rev. J. W. Appleford in his 1880 book ‘A Brief Account of the Parish and Church of St.

East Yorkshire News Year’s Traditions

The following New Year traditions from East Yorkshire were published in ‘County Folk-Lore Volume VI – Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ which was edited by Eliza Glutch.

All peacock feathers must be thrown out before New Year’s Day, or else you will have ill luck.
 

Priory Church of St Mary, Bridlington

The Priory Church of St Mary is a Grade I listed building and stands on the site of an Augustine Priory founded in 1113 and dissolved during the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538. There is a story associated with the Priory Church and the name for Bridlington folk, Bolliton (or Bollington, Burlington) Jackdaws”

Headless Man, Frodingham

Between Frodingham and Foston a headless man haunts the road, but he has only been seen once. — [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire’ by John Nicholson (1890)]

Headless Horseman, Atwick

Between Atwick and Skipsea there races along-occasionally the headless man mounted on a swift horse. – [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire’ by John Nicholson (1890)]

Halliwell Boggle

Between Atwick and Bewholme, at the foot of the hill on which Atwick church stands, there is a spring and pool of water overhung by willows haunted by the Halliwell Boggle. A boggle is an imaginary hobgoblin, without any special form, causing fear and terror. — [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire’ by John Nicholson (1890)]

Willie Sled’s Dog

‘The boggle infesting Brigham Lane end, where four roads meet, is a white dog known as Willie Sled’s dog. Willie Sled used to attend to those who came to the Brigham sand-pit ; and as nearly every pit in the Riding has its goblin, this one is named after him.’ — ‘Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire’ by John Nicholson (1890).

Screaming Skull of Lund

I cannot find any details about this story apart from the following reference Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire’ by John Nicholson (1890). ‘There is a similar tradition (to that of Burton Agnes Hall) respecting the Manor House at Lund, where the skull has been walled u

St John’s Well, Harpham

The well of St John of Beverley can be found beside the road on the east side of Harpham. St John (died 7 May 721) was born in Beverley and on his feast day (7th May) it is decorated and a procession of the choir and congregation of Beverley Minster make their way to it from the church in Harpham.