Maiden’s Castle, Reeth

The following treasure legend was published in Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson (1879). ‘I learn from Mr. Robinson, of Hill House, Reeth, Yorkshire, that in his neighbourhood as in many others is a place called Maiden’s Castle, in which tradition avers a chest of gold is buried.

St. Mary’s Church, Scarborough

St Mary’s Church is a Grade I listed building dating from the 12th century, though much of it was rebuilt in the 17th century after it was damaged during the siege ofScarborough Castle during the English Civil War in 1644. In ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939), Elliott O’Donnell (27 February 1872 – 8 May 1965) refers to a woman keeping vigil at St Mary’s on St Mark’s Eve.

All Saints Church, York

The 14th century All Saints’ Church is a Grade I listed building. According to ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939) by Elliott O’Donnell (27 February 1872 – 8 May 1965) ‘All sorts of queer stories are told, too, of the other Pavement church, All Saints.

St. Crux Church, York

The 15th century St Crux Church was demolished in 1887 and some of its stone was then used to build St Crux Parish Hall. Writing in 1939, Elliott O’Donnell (27 February 1872 – 8 May 1965) mentioned the following ghostly traditions associated with St Crux in his ‘Haunted Churches’. ‘All kinds of stories have at various times been circulated regarding ghostly happenings at St.

St. George’s Church, York

On George Street stands the Roman Catholic Church of St George, across from the site of an earlier 16th century St George’s Church which fell into ruin. With the graveyard (which still survives) of this original St George’s was thought to be buried Richard "Dick" Turpin (Died 7 April 1739).

Sexhow Ghost

According to ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). ‘Mr. G. M. Tweddell thus relates the history of an apparition which with fitting retributive justice haunted a certain Yorkshire farmer.

St Oswald’s (Old) Church, Fulford

Now a private residence, St Oswald’s (Old) Church, dates from 1150 and its nave, and west tower, were originally from St Mary’s Abbey. William Camidge related the following story.

Middlesbrough Central Library

The Central Library (or Carnegie Library) was Middlesbrough’s first purpose built public library and it was opened on 8 May 1912 by Alderman Amos Hinton (Born in Tring 1844 – Died 1919). There are now rumors that this building is haunted and one of the rooms is referred to as The Ghost Room.

Grassington Bargest

The following story was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890], under the title ‘Billy B—‘s Adventure’ and Robert Hunt’s ‘Popular Romances of the West of England’ was cited.

The Blinded Giant, Dalton

The following tale of a North Yorkshire giant appeared in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ by Edwin Sidney Hartland [1890] who cited ‘Notes on the Folk-Lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders.’