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Celtic Pantheons


Aengus Angus

An Irish god of love, he was one of the offspring of the promiscuous Dagda, and there are various tales told about his exploits in Irish mythology. Read More »

Afagddu (Avagddu)

The son of Ceridwen and Tegid Veol, in the Welsh myth of Taliesin. Ceridwen had two children; a daughter of outstanding beauty, and a son Afagddu, who was malformed and ugly (the least favoured of all men). To balance Afagddu's misfortune, Ceridwen decided to create a potion in her cauldron of inspiration, so that he might have knowledge of the future, clear sight, and be favoured among men. Read More »

Arawn

A Welsh god who is the ruler of the underworld. He is mentioned in the Mabinogion in the Tale of 'Pwyll Lord of Dyfed' and in 'The Spoils of Annwn'.

Pwyll meets the god while he out hunting on the fringes of his kingdom, and offends Arawn by letting his hounds loose on a stag already being hunted by him. Read More »

Arianrhod

A Welsh goddess mentioned in the old Welsh stories now incorporated into the Mabinogion. She is the daughter of Don and the sister of Gwydion, the bard and magician. Read More »

Balor of the Evil Eye

Balor can be equated to a god of death and destruction, in Irish mythology he was the son of Net, and lord of the Formorians, the grotesque race that inhabited Ireland before the Tuatha de Dannan. Read More »

Belenos (Belinus, Beli)

A Solar deity, he can be seen as a Celtic equivalent of Apollo, and there are various traces of his cult in Britain. In Irish mythology he was Bile, a powerful god of the underworld. Read More »

Blodeuwedd

A flower maiden of Welsh myth, created for Llew Llaw Gyffes by Gwydion and Math from flowers and nine elements, because he was forbidden to take a human wife. Read More »

Bran The Blessed

A Welsh and Irish god of giant size who was the son of the sea god Mannannan Mac Lir.

Bran had many heroic episodes, but was fatally injured during an excursion to Ireland to rescue his sister Branwen. Mortally wounded in the foot with a poisoned spear, he ordered his companions to take his severed head to the White Mount, where the Tower of London now stands. Read More »

Brigantia

A goddess associated with farming and with cattle, two very important commodities in Celtic society. She was reared on the milk of a fairy cow, and pictured as a beautiful woman wearing a crown, and a breastplate, and carrying a spear. Read More »

Brigid

Brigid's festival is the first of February, otherwise known as Imbolc, when ritual fires of purification were lit. She takes over from the goddess of winter and is seen as the maiden aspect of the triple goddess by some researchers. In Irish mythology she is the daughter of the Dagda, the father god, and ruler of the Tuatha de Dannan. Read More »

Celtic Pantheon Quick Guide

Abandus - God of Godmanchester in Huntingdonshire.

Ambisagrus - The persistent.

Andraste - The goddess of victory, invoked by Boudicca during her uprising in AD60.

Aramo - The gentle god.

Arawn - Welsh god of the underworld or Annwn. He was the keeper of a magic cauldron. Read More »

Cernunnos

Cernunnos

Although Cernunnos is a Gaulish horned god, his worship was widespread in the Celtic era, and he was venerated over the channel in Britain in various similar forms. Read More »

Cerridwen (Keridwen)

Cerridwen can be seen as a form of the dark goddess, associated with wisdom, magic loss and renewal. In Welsh mythology her dwelling place was said to be in the middle of lake Tegid, which is also called lake Bala in Gwynedd Wales. Read More »

Dagda, Dahgdha, The Father God

The father god of Irish mythology, his name means 'The Good' he is master of all arts and knowledge, and can be seen as one of the most powerful gods in the Irish Celtic pantheon. Read More »

Epona

Epona

The horse was very important in Celtic society, and the main goddess associated with the horse was Epona, worshiped widely throughout Britain and the Continent during the Iron Age and Roman Period. Read More »

Here Be Dragons And Ghosts...The Coiled Serpent And Otherworld Hoodies

Drakelow

Drakelow in Worcestershire derives its name from a mythological creature - the dragon. The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. In Old English wyrm means "serpent", draca means "dragon" (Skeat). Read More »

Llew Llaw Gyffes

Llew is seen by many scholars as the Welsh equivalent of Lugh, (which means light) the Irish god of light who is master of all the crafts of men. There are several parallels to his character and Llew, who is also known for his deftness of hand and skill in all things. Read More »

Medieval Heretics and the Green Man

There is a general acceptance that the Green Man is a representation of a pagan deity, but this is not borne out by the abundance of Green Man carvings to be found on or within Christian churches. Could this contradiction be the clue that will lead to our understanding of this archaic figure? Why do we find the Green Many associated with churches? Read More »

Morrigan

Morrigan

The Morrigan is the fearsome Irish Goddess of Death, Conflict and Sexuality. Her name means 'Phantom Queen'. She is also known as Nehain (Frenzy) and Badhbh (Raven or Crow). Read More »

Newgrange

Newgrange Entrance

If we were making a list of the top 100 ancient sites in Britain and Ireland (as is the current vogue) Newgrange would undoubtedly be in the hallowed top 10. Its great age, size, astronomical features and location in the beautiful Boyne Valley, mark it as one of the most important ‘mystery' sites in Europe. Read More »



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