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Nordic Pantheons


Balder (Baldur/Baldr), The Shinning God

Balder was known as the 'Shinning God' or the 'Bleeding God' and was the fairest of all the gods in the Germanic pantheon. He was tragically killed by the trickery of Loki. Read More »

Fenrir

Fenrir

Fenrir was the first-born offspring of Loki - the god of trickery - and the giant Angrboda, their other foul creations being Hel and Jormungand. Read More »

Frigg, Queen of Heaven

Frigg is the mother goddess of the Nordic pantheon, as the wife of Odin she is one of the most powerful goddesses, and 'Queen of the Heavens'.

She was the daughter of Nott and Nat and the mother of Baldur, the fairest of the gods. Read More »

Hel, Queen of Hell

One of the foul creations from the coupling of Loki and the giant Angrboda, Hel was the ruler of the netherworld (Niflheim or Helheim) where men who died out of battle went.

Her realm also had a place for criminals, oath-breakers and assassins, all taboo in Nordic society. Read More »

Loki, The Trickster

Loki, the trickster god, was the most malignant of the Nordic gods, but he could swing from the role of malicious trickster, to the one who baled the gods out of trouble. Read More »

Nordic Pantheon Quick Guide

Aegir - God of the sea, the wind and waves.

Annar -Another name for Odin.

Angrboda -The mother of Fenris the wolf and Hela the goddess of hell.

Audhumla -The mother goddess, she nourished Ymir the primal giant.

Aurgelmir -The primal god. Read More »

Odin, The All Knowing

Odin

The Germanic god of wisdom, war and magic, he was worshiped throughout Britain, wherever the Vikings and other Nordic tribes settled. Many places are named after him, or from derivations of his name. Read More »

Shervage Wood

Shervage Wood has is home to a number of traditions, perhaps because it was once perceived as being enchanted. In legend and folklore the wood was the home of a dragon known as The Gurt Vurm of Shervage Wood. The dragon was said to have the girth of at least three mature oak trees, and was the bane of the local villages eating cattle and making a general nuisance of itself. Read More »

Wayland, Welund, Volund

Wayland was the traditional Saxon god of smiths who became amalgamated into fairy lore. Many places are associated with Wayland in the British Isles, in particular Wayland's Smithy, a Neolithic burial chamber in Oxfordshire. He is associated with horses, magic, metalworking, cunning, skill and healing. Read More »

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