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Roman Pantheons


Bath (Aqua Sullis)

Bath (Aqua Sullis)

The hot springs and the Roman bath house are a Celtic/Roman sacred place, dedicated to the Sullis and the goddess Minerva. In myth the sacred spring was discovered by King Bladud, who was cured of leprosy by the healing waters and mud. Read More »

Diana

A goddess of the moon and wild places, Diana is the primal powerful goddess and the 'Queen of Heaven' in the Roman Pantheon. Read More »

Epona

Epona

The horse was very important in Celtic society, and the main goddess associated with the horse was Epona, worshiped widely throughout Britain and the Continent during the Iron Age and Roman Period. Read More »

Jupiter

Jupiter was the supreme god of the Romans, and the Lord of the Heavens and the Sky.

Being the lord of the skies he was responsible for all the weather, especially thunder and lightning, he was sometimes referred to as the Thunderer for this reason. Read More »

Mars

Mars is the Roman god of war and also of agriculture. He was very important to the Romans because he was the father of Romulus and Remus, the mythical founders of Rome.

In the beginning Mars was seen as more of an agricultural or pastoral god, this still had relevance, even after he became more and more associated with war. Read More »

Mithra (Mithras)

The Sun God worshipped throughout the Roman Empire since it was first encountered by them in Persia during the reign of Emperor Nero. Mithra was born from a rock within a cave, and his birth was witnessed by a group of shepherds. He has also been depicted as being born from a tree, and at Housesteads on Hadrians Wall, there was a tradition that he came forth from a Cosmic Egg. Read More »

Roman Pantheon Quick Guide

Abandinus - God of Godmanchester in Huntingdonshire.

Apollo -The sun god depicted with a bow and arrow, and a 4 horse chariot.

Bachus -God of wine, feasting, fertility and ecstasy, his feast day is on the 17th of March.

Bellona - Goddess of war. Read More »

The London Stone

London Stone (4)

Mounted behind an iron grill in the wall of 111 Cannon Street (originally known as Candlewick Street) can be found what could be described as one of London’s most ancient monuments, The London Stone (also known as The Brutus stone). Read More »



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