You are hereRecent Additions

Recent Additions



The Miller at the Professor’s Examination

THERE once came to England a famous foreign professor, and before he came he gave notice that he would examine the students of all the colleges in England. After a time he had visited all but Cambridge, and he was on his road thither to examine publicly the whole university. Read More »

The Three Wishes

A WOODMAN went to the forest to fell some timber. Just as be was applying the axe to the trunk of a huge old oak out jumped a fairy, who beseeched him with the most supplicating gestures to spare the tree. Moved more by fright and astonishment than anything else, the man consented, and as a reward for his forbearance was promised the fulfilment of his three next wishes. Read More »

The Wise Fools of Gotham

CUCKOO BUSH, near Gotham, tradition says, was planted or set to commemorate a trick which the inhabitants of Gotham put upon King John. The tale is told thus King John, passing through this place towards Nottingham, intending to go over the meadows, was prevented by the villagers, they apprehending that the ground over which a king passed was for ever after to become a public road. Read More »

The Fairy Funeral

The following story entitled ‘The Fairy Funeral’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘THE parish church of Lelant is curiously situated amidst hills of blown sand, near the entrance of the creek of Hayle. Read More »

The Pedlar of Swaffham

The following story entitled ‘The Pedlar of Swaffham’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

Whittington Stone

At the foot of Highgate Hill can be found the Whittington Stone, so named after Dick Whittington, who, according to tradition sat here and heard the bells of Bow Church which he thought were saying "Turn again, Whittington, Lord Mayor of London." The following account of the story of Dick Whittington and his cat was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Read More »

The Princess of Colchester

The following tale entitled ‘The Princess of Colchester’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘LONG before Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, there reigned in the eastern part of England a king who kept his Court at Colchester. Read More »

The Princess of Canterbury

The following tale entitled ‘The Princess of Canterbury’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘IN days of yore, when this country was governed by many kings, among the rest the King of Canterbury had an only daughter, wise, fair, and beautiful. Read More »

Hackpen White Horse

The White Horse carved into Hackpen Hill dates from 1838 and was created to commemorate the coronation of Queen Victoria. The horse measures 90ft by 90ft.

Barbury Castle

Barbury Castle is an Iron Age hill fort and can be found on Barbury Hill. It was around here in 556AD that the Battle of Beran Byrig or Beranburh was fought and the Britons were defeated by the West Saxons.

The Ridgeway National Trail footpath passes through Barbury Castle.

The Roaring Bull of Bagbury

The following story entitled ‘The Roaring Bull of Bagbury’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

Whiteleaf Hill Burial Mound

An oval neolithic burial mound dating from 3,750-3,100 B.C. can be foun don Whiteleaf Hill. Within the mound was buried a single male. Animal bones and pottery shards found within indicate evidence of ceremonial feasting when the mound was constructed. It was first excavated by Sir Lindsay Scott in the 1930’s and the again by Oxford Archaeology between 2002 and 2006.

The Parish of St Andrew, Leyland

The Parish of St Andrew in Leyland dates from 1220, though it is thought a church has been on this site since the 12th Century. The church has had several alterations over the centuries, but what I want to concentrate on is the initial construction of the first church and the siting legends associated with it. Read More »

The King of the Fairies

The following folktale entitled 'The King of the Fairies' was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878). Read More »

The Unbidden Guest

The following folktale entitled 'The Unbidden Guest' was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878). 'On a little lane leading from the town of Clitheroe there once lived a noted 'cunning man,' to whom all sorts of applications were made, not only by the residents, but also by people from distant places, for the fame of the wizard had spread over the whole country side. Read More »

Cymbeline's Castle (Cymbeline's Mound, Cymbeline’s Mount or Belinus's Castle)

Cymbeline's Mound is the site of a small Norman motte and bailey castle. The motte or mound is 42 meters in diameter with a ditch on three sides. There is a Devil legend associated with this site. It is said that if you run around the mound seven times the Devil will appear.

Goring-by-Sea Dancing Ghost

The following article entitled ‘Ghostly Goring scared out of its wits’ was published in the Worthing Herald, on Tuesday 30 October 2007. It concerns a spree of ghost sightings in Goring-by-Sea at the end of the 1920’s. The article mentions that sightings took place around Goring Hall. Read More »

Th' Skriker (Shrieker)

The following story entitled "Th' Skriker (Shrieker)" was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878).  'On a fine night, about the middle of December, many years ago, a sturdy-looking young fellow left Chipping for his cottage, three or four miles away, upon the banks of the Hodder. Read More »

The Bee Hole Boggart

There is story that many years ago in the Burnley area, a woman known as Old Bet was snatched and killed by The Bee Hole Boggart.  Bits of her skin were then said to have been found bung on a rose bush.

Nogworth Cross

Only the base remains of The Nogworth Cross (aka Northwood Cross) which can be found beside a lane near Shay Lane and the Todmorden Road.  According to ‘A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6’ (1911), ‘In the Extwistle part, on the high moorland, are some tumuli and the sites of supposed British and Roman camps; there is another camp above Thursden. Read More »

Lee Green Scar, Extwistle

According to Leslie Chapple 'Romantic Old Houses and Their Tales', ‘In 1902, in a lecture to the Burnley Literary and Scientific Club, Mr. Read More »

The Sands of Cocker

The following story entitled ‘The Sands of Cocker’ was published in ‘Goblin Tales of Lancashire’ by James Bowker (1878). Read More »

A4146 Monk, Edlesborough

A phantom monk in a black habit is said to have been witnessed by a car driver near the parish church of St Mary the Virgin as he drove through Edlesborough on the A4146 in the 1970’s.  The monk vanished when the driver stopped and shone a torch at it.

Extwistle Hall

Now in ruins, the Grade II listed, Tudor style Extwistle Hall was built by the Parker family in the 16th century.   Once land owned by Kirkstall Abbey, Exwistle passed to William Ramsden following the Dissolution of the Monasteries and then to Robert Parker. The Hall remained their seat until the tragic event of 1718. Read More »

The Bell, Edlesborough

Now a private residence, The Bell was a Grade II listed public house dating from the mid 18th century. The Luton Paranormal website refers to a time after 1984 when John and Margaret Pilgrim lived there. Read More »



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site