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Old Brine, Nantwich

On Ascension Day, the old inhabitants of Nantwich piously sang a hymn of thanksgiving for the blessing of the Brine. Read More »

Bag or Black Mere

Robert Charles Hope gives the following description of Bag Mere in ‘The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells’ (1893). "Before any heir of this [Brereton] family dies, there are seen in a lake adjoyning, the bodies of trees swimming upon the water for several days together." — [Camden : Brit. (Gibson's ed.), i. 677.] Read More »

Parrot and Punchbowl, Aldringham

A former 16th centry smugglers inn, the website for the Parrot & Punchbowl public house refers to a stone found outside the building relating to the death of a shepherd. Read More »

Beck Row

There is a story associated with the road between Beck Row and Holywell Row. One version suggests a large figure appeared before a group of people near to Aspal Hall saying either "Don't fear me - fear my follower!" (or 'Don't fear me, fear what follows me'). As he vanished there was a huge gust of wind. Read More »

Chaonei No.81

In central Beijing there is a beautiful 19th century mansion built in the French Baroque style. It lies abandoned and overgrown with weeds which is perhaps surprising given that this is prime real estate in the middle of one of the world's biggest cities. The reason is that Chinese buyers shun this building because of its reputation as a haunted house. Read More »

St Mungo’s Well, Bromfield

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘In Bromfield there were plenty of legends connected with this well. It is situated in a field near the churchyard. The present vicar, the Rev. R. Taylor, with reverent care, had it cleared and enclosed with a circular vaulted dome of stone, on which he placed an appropriate inscription. Read More »

St Cuthbert’s Well, Bromfield

In 'The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England' by Robert Charles Hope (1893) we are informed that; ‘In the parish of Bromfield, in the neighbourhood of Blencogo, “on the common to the east of that village, not far from Ware-Brig, near a pretty large rock of granite, called St. Read More »

Lady Well, Thirsk

“An old historian of the town says: "In the marsh near the church flows a spring of pure and excellent water, commonly called Lady Well, doubtless a name of no modern description." Yorks. Folk-lore, p. 199. . [The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893)] Read More »

The River Ouse, York

'There is an old tradition, possibly credited by some at the present time, that if anyone casts five white stones into a particular part of the river Ouse, near the city, as the clock in the Minster tower strikes one on May morning, he will see on the surface of the water, as if looking into a mirror, whatever is desired of the past, present, and future. . Read More »

Ecclesall Woods

According to an article by Alex Evans entitled ‘Halloween: Sheffield’s Top 10 most haunted places revealed’ which was published in The Star on 26 October 2015, ‘Ecclesall Woods houses a haunted grave; a woodsman who burned to death in a strange, unexplained ac Read More »

Llyn-Yr-Avave or the Beaver Lake

According to Oliver's Beverley and The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893),‘The origin of Bever-lee, the town of Beverley, which was in the ancient wood Deira, is referred to in the old religious ceremony of drawing the shrine, or emblematical Beaver, out of the lake in the wood, and placing it in security on an eminence in the sight of the assembled Read More »

St Johns Well, Sutton-on-the-Forest

According to The Legendary Lore of the Holy Wells of England by Robert Charles Hope (1893), ‘About a mile from the nunnery*, at the corner of the wood called St. John's Wood, was formerly an ancient building, consisting of a small dome of stone and brick over a spring, well known in the neighbourhood as "St. Read More »

Ye Olde White Harte, Hull

Ye Olde White Harte on Silver Street is a Grade II listed building with strong links to the English Civil War and a reputation of being haunted. Built around 1550, the building became a public house in the late 18th century. However, it was in this building, in the "plotting parlour" above the back bar, that on 23 April 1642, a fateful decision was made. Read More »

Nursery Corner, Acton

'In the little village of Acton, Suffolk, a legend was current not many years ago, that on certain occasions, which, by the way, were never accurately defined, the park gates were wont to fly open at midnight “withouten hands," and a carriage drawn by four spectral horses, and accompanied by headless grooms and outriders, proceeded with great rapidity from the park to a spot called Read More »

Wimbell Pond

Tradition says an iron chest of money is concealed: if any daring person ventures to approach the pond, and throw a stone into the water, it will ring against the chest ; and a small white figure has been heard to cry in accents of distress, ‘That's mine’. [W Sparrow Simpson from Notes and Queries 1889 & County Folk-Lore: Suffolk (1893) Lady Camilla Gurdon] Read More »

Collinson’s Well

'The church was dedicated in honour of St. John the Baptist. Little remains to tell either of the castle or well on Hutton Common, but both were popularly known as having been named after one Collinson. There was a tradition, with every probability of truth, that when King Charles marched his men on the road through this parish he turned aside and drank out of Collinson's Well. Read More »

The Star, York Street

The following description about the haunting of the The Star’s building is extracted from an article by Alex Evans entitled ‘Halloween: Sheffield’s Top 10 most haunted places revealed’ which was published in The Star on 26 October 2015. ‘Campo Read More »

Highcliffe Road, Ecclesall

According to the following extract from an article by Alex Evans entitled ‘Halloween: Sheffield’s Top 10 most haunted places revealed’ which was published in The Star on 26 October 2015, Highcliffe Road is haunted by ‘A phantom woman who lurks along the road a Read More »

West Bar Roundabout

The following description is extracted from an article by Alex Evans entitled ‘Halloween: Sheffield’s Top 10 most haunted places revealed’ which was published in The Star on 26 October 2015. Read More »

Spinkhill to Killamarsh Black Dog

Apparently there have been reports of a black dog that has been seen seen on the road between Spinkhill and Killamarsh. It is thought to appears to lone drivers.

The Radclyffe Arms

There is a story that an apparition of a man has been seen sitting at the bar with a pint of beer. It has been suggested that it could be the ghost a man who killed himself in the cellar. This haunting is mentioned on several websites but I am unsure of its origin.

Cavendish Court Job Centre

According to an article by Alex Evans entitled ‘Halloween: Sheffield’s Top 10 most haunted places revealed’ which was published in The Star on 26 October 2015, the Cavendish Court Job Centre on Meetinghouse Lane may be haunted. Read More »

Pond Hill, Sheffield

The Old Queens Head public house is a Grade II listed building that dates from 1475 and is thought to be the oldest domestic building in Sheffield. Read More »

Oatlands Park Hotel, Weybridge

The wonderful four-star Oatlands Park Hotel is built within the grounds of a Royal Palace and may have a reputation of being haunted. The Tudor Palace of Oatlands was demolished following the execution of King Charles I (Died 1649). A house, possibly a hunting lodge associated with Palace survived and was eventually enlarged, extended and renovated into a mansion. Read More »

Dorking Graveyard

According to an article in Surrey Life entitled ‘Surrey's most haunted sites - spooky Halloween stories’ (19 October 2015) ‘A headless horse rider in black follows an original track in the vicinity of Dorking Graveyard, galloping across the headstones into the hedges.’



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