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Sentinel House, Hanley

The Stoke Sentinel moved into the former Bethesda Sunday School, on Bethesda Street, Hanley in September 2013. On 23 October 2013 the following article by Dave Knapper entitled ‘Is The Sentinel's Hanley headquarters haunted?’ was published. Read More »

Hanley Town Hall

Designed by Robert Scrivener and originally built as the Queens Hotel in 1869, the Town Hall was acquired by the town of Hanley in 1884. The following article entitled ‘Could Hanley Town Hall be haunted?’ was published in The Stoke Sentinel on 1 April 2014. Read More »

Minerva Inn, Plymouth

Dating from the late 16th century or early 17th century*, the Grade II listed Minerva is Plymouth’s oldest serving public house. Found at 31 Looe Street, the Minerva was associated with Plymouth’s Press Gangs and many a customer in the 17th century were tricked into service aboard Navy vessels. Read More »

Royal Leamington Spa Railway Station

The railway station at Royal Leamington Spa apparrently has a reputation for being haunted. Read More »

Healing Manor Hotel

Dating from 1892, Healing Manor was built by the Portman family and remained their family seat for many years. Read More »

Gunby Hall

Built for Sir William Massingberd, 2nd Baronet (Born 1650 – Died 1719) and dating from 1700*, Gunby Hall is a Grade I listed country house owned by the National Trust with a reputation of being haunted. Read More »

The Ghost of Mae Nak

I recently watched a Thai ghost film called "The Ghost of Mae Nak" and decided to do some research on the legend behind the film, during which I found it interesting to note a slight similarity between this legend and "The Black Lady of Bradley Woods" despite the storie Read More »

The Little Book of Ghosts by Paul Adams

The Little Book Of Ghosts by Paul Adams

This may be called The Little Book of Ghosts but it's anything but that! Paul Adams has packed it full to the brim with interesting and informative accounts of ghosts and hauntings.
Read More »

The Hummums, Covent Garden

The following account was published in ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ by John Ingram (1897). Read More »

Russian Cultural Centre, Valletta

Sir Oliver Starkey (Born around 1523 – Died around 1583-86) was one of the last English Knights in the Order of Saint John and was present during the Great Siege of Malta in 1565. Latin Secretary to Jean Parisot de Valette* (Born 4 February 1495 – Died 21 August 1568, Malta), Sir Oliver is the only Knight of the Order of St John buried in St. Read More »

Southend-on-Sea Ratman

I thought I'd tell you of a local legend in Southend-on-Sea that I heard growing up and thought you'd enjoy. In our town, there is a pretty grim underpass that's been there for years, and has developed a reputation for being crime-ridden and basically a no-go-area after dark. However, more interesting is the ghost said to haunt it. Read More »

Krasue

Whilst in Thailand I watched a film called "Demonic Beauty". It was an interesting film so I decided to research the legend behind it, which relates to a traditional Thai ghost story. It concerns a spirit known as "Krasue" in Thailand, "Ap" or "Ahp" in Cambodia and Penanggalan in Malaysia. Read More »

The Tarxien Temples

The Tarxien Temples were discovered in 1913 or 1914 by local farmers ploughing the field and the sites thorough excavation began in 1915. A World Heritage Site, the megalithic Tarxien Temples are made up of four interlinked structures dating from between 3600BC and 2500BC. The structures are referred to as the South Temple, East Temple and Central Temple. Read More »

Black Knight of Manoel Island

Once the property of the Bishop of Malta and known as l'Isola del Vescovo, Manoel Island took its present name name from António Manoel de Vilhena (Born 28 May 1663 – Died 10 December 1736), the 66th Grand Master of the Sovereign Military Hospitaller Order of Saint John of Jerusalem of Rhodes and of Malta, who commissioned a fort to be built here in 1726 and according to some, may Read More »

Parish Church of St Mary, Worstead

The Grade I listed church of St Mary in Worstead is associated with the legend of ghostly White Lady with healing powers. In the 1970's a photograph was taken within the church of Diane Berthelot and behind her is what some people believe may be this apparition. Read More »

Dr James Clark’s Home, Brook Street

The following account concerning a crisis apparition was published by John Ingram in his ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’(1897). It concerns the home and practice of Dr James Clark (Born 14 December 1788 – Died 29 June 1870) who was Queen Victoria’s physician between 1837 and 1860. Read More »

Jedburgh Castle

Jedburgh’s original wooden motte and bailey castle dated back to the 12th century and was founded by King David I of Scotland (Born 1084 – Died 24 May 1153). The Scottish demolished the castle in 1409, which by then was a stone fortress with a pele tower, gatehouse and courtyard. In 1823 a Howard Reform prison was built on the site of the castle which was then closed in 1868. Read More »

When Witches Communed With Fairies

Magic Cirle

Our modern conventions tend to view the realms of fairies and witches separately. Witches have been viewed as evil, while fairies are seen as benevolent, cute, and kind. As scholars reevaluate witch trials and the confessions of those accused, we are coming to new conclusions on accused witches. Read More »

The British Witch: The Biography by Peter Maxwell-Stuart

The British Witch

For over five hundred years witches, male and female, practised magic for harm and good in their communities.  Most witches worked locally, used by their neighbours to cure illness, create love, or gratify personal spite against another. Read More »

Bolling Hall Museum

Now a museum, Bolling Hall, parts of which which date from the 14th century, is one of Bradford’s oldest buildings. It would also appear to have a reputation for being haunted and has a famous legend relating to a white lady in what is known as the Ghost Room. Read More »

Dr Donne, Drury Lane (Early 17th Century)

Dr John Donne (Born 1573 – Died 1631) was a Dean of St Paul’s and a poet, who had a strange experience which could be considered a crisis apparition. The following account of this experience was published in ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’ (1897) by John Ingram. Read More »

Orkney’s Terrible Trows

Danish Troll Postcard 1918

Trows are fascinating creatures found only in the folklore of the Orkney and Shetland islands. But, describing them accurately is difficult because sources are not clear. Folklorists have long insisted that the word “trow” is a corruption of “troll,” and that Orkney’s Trows descend from their Viking ancestors’ stories of Trolls. Read More »

Lostock Tower

The Grade II listed Gatehouse, a private residence, is all that now remains of Lostock Hall, a moated manor house demolished between 1816 and 1824. Lostock Hall was the ancestral home of the Anderton family. Read More »

Folklore And The Fin Folk of Orkney

Yesnaby Castle by Wolfgang Schlick

Folklore is an integral part of any cultural heritage. Sometimes written off as childish fairytale, folklore deserves to be recognized as a valuable treasure trove of information about our own past. The tales and legends of folklore are the result of oral tradition handed down by mouth through the generations. Read More »

Langleys, Great Waltham

Langleys is a red brick 18th century house shaped as a H. Read More »



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