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Knurre-Murre

The following Danish story was published in ‘Popular Rhymes and Nursery Tales’ by J. O. Halliwell-Phillipps (1849). ‘An analogous story is found in the people-literature of Denmark. Near a town called Lyng is the hill of Brondhoë, inhabited by the trold-folk, or imps. Read More »

Borough Hill

According to ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland,‘IN the vestry of Frensham Church, in Surrey, on the north side of the chancel, is an extraordinary great kettle or caldron, which the inhabitants say, by tradition, was brought Read More »

A Witch-Hare at Sedgefield

The following account of the story is extracted from ‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘A similar incident* is said to have happened at the small market town of Sedgefield, about seventy years ago. A party out coursing hares raised one in a field near that place, towards which they were astonished to see that it ran direct. Read More »

Ceddesfield Hall

Ceddesfield Hall is a Grade II listed building dating from the 18thcentury. Now a community centre, Ceddesfield Hall was originally built as a rectory for Reverend George Barrington. The previous rectory which this replaced burned down in 1793. It was this older building that was associated with the ‘Pickled Parson’. Read More »

To Counteract Witchcraft

The following account of the story is extracted from‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). 'A case occurred in old Dundas Street, Monkwearmouth, twenty-four years ago, of a child believed to be witched, so that it was shrivelled up to anatomy. Read More »

The Witch of Easington

The following story was published in ‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘Mrs. Read More »

Upton Snodsbury Fairies

The following story concerning a fairy encounter was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

Inkberrow Siting Legend

In his‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890), Edwin Sidney Hartland gives the following account of a siting legend. Read More »

Leddy Lister

The following account of the story is extracted from‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). 'A retired farmers wife at Hedworth, who went by the name of Leddy Lister, was commonly held by the people round about to be a witch. Read More »

Witch Cat, Staindrop

The following account of the story is extracted from‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘Mr. Hylton Longstaffe relates that a farmer of Staindrop was one night crossing a bridge near that place, when a cat jumped out, stood before him, and looking him full in the face, said "Johnny Reed, Johnny Reed! Read More »

A Witch Cat

The following account of the story is extracted from‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘Mr. Read More »

Bewitched Child, Wearmouth Colliery

The following account of the story is extracted from‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). 'It is far from uncommon, in Sunderland, Shields, Durham, Hartlepool, and other towns and villages, for mothers whose children are not thriving to think them bewitched. Read More »

Black Willie of Hartlepool

The following account of the story is extracted from ‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). 'The Rev. H. B. Read More »

Church of St Edmund, Sedgefield

The Church of St Edmundthe Bishop at Sedgefield is a Grade I listed building dating from the 13thcentury. This church is associated with the story of the ‘Pickled Parson’. The following account of the story is extracted from ‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘The Rev. Read More »

Browsholme Hall

Dating from 1507, Browsholme Hall is a Grade I listed private residence and could be the oldest surviving family home in Lancashire. Read More »

Frensham Common Round Barrows

There is a group of four Round Barrows on Frensham Common. Three are clustered close to each other and the fourth is found roughly 150 meters to the north of them.

Mother Ludlam's Cave

Mother Ludham’s Cave, was so named after the White Witch that was said to live in it. This small sandstone cave can be found in the Wey Valley and is also associated with the ruined Cistercian Waverley Abbey, or more correctly the spring inside it is associated with the monks that lived there. This spring was known as Ludwell and later St Mary's Well. Read More »

Devil’s Punch Bowl, Hindhead

The Devil's Punch Bowl at Hindhead is a large natural hollow with several pieces of folk lore attached to Old Nick himself. Read More »

Osebury Rock

Osebury Rock (or Rosebury Rock) is a remarkable cliff with dense woodland on the River Teme which, according to Edwin Hartland in his ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890), has an association with fairies. Read More »

A Myth of Middridge

The following story entitled ‘A Myth of Midridge’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘TALKING about fairies the other day to a nearly octogenarian female neighbour, I asked, Had she ever seen one in her youthful days? Read More »

Yan Di - The First Chinese Emperor

The legendary Yan Di or "Flame Emperor" is said to have ruled a stone age tribe around the area of Yang Tou Shan (Sheep's Head Mountain) just north of Baoji in Shaanxi province, China. There are few facts known about Yan Di as historical records do not exist from the time he supposedly lived. Read More »

Devil’s Jumps

Three small hills near Churt have been known as the Devils Jumps (or the Devils Three Jumps) since at least 1765. The highest of the three hills is known as Stony Jump. There are a few folk tales attached to these hills which explains their name. Read More »

Tom Dula (Dooley)

"Hang down your head Tom Dooley,
Hang down your head and cry,
Hang down your head Tom Dooley,
Poor boy, you're bound to die!" Read More »

Myers Flat

An article in the North Echo entitled ‘How railway builders took on the fairies’ was published on Monday 16 June 2008. It concerns the building of the Stockton and Darlington Railway in 1823 and refers to the local belief that fairies hindered progress at Myers Flat. Read More »

Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, Frensham

Inside the 13th century Church of Saint Mary the Virgin at Frensham is held a beaten copper cauldron. The medieval 19 inch deep cauldron is believed to have been used for the brewing of Church Ale and has apparently been kept in the church 'from beyond the memory of man'. Read More »



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