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Headless Coachman, Norwich

The following extract is taken from ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). ‘The Headless Coach, or more correctly coach with headless coachman, appears again in Norfolk. Mr. Read More »

Swine Drawn Coach (1684)

In his ‘Memorials, or the memorable things that fell out within this island of Britain from 1638 – 1684’ (Published 1818), Robert Law quotes the diary of Jacob Bee of Durham, who refers to a strange experience that was deemed a portent of death. “John Borrow departed this life the 17th day of January being Satterday this yeare 1684 and twas reported y’he see a coa Read More »

Langley Hall, Burnhope

The fortified manor house known as Langley Hall is a Grade II listed ruin, dating from the early 16th century. Read More »

The Ladies Bow-Brig-Syke

The following story was published in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). ‘About half-a mile to the east of Maxton, a small rivulet runs across the turnpike-road, at a spot called Bow-brig-syke. Read More »

Laird Harry Gilles

The following was published in ‘Scottish Fairy and Folk Tales’ by George Douglas (1901) but he cites ‘Folk-lore of the Northern Counties’by William Henderson’ (1879).’THE Laird Harry Gilles of Littledean was extremely fond of hunting. Read More »

Littledean Tower

The 15th century Littledean Tower is now a ruin, but this fortified house was the home of the Kers of Littledean. The following story about Littledean was published in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). Read More »

Sexhow Ghost

According to ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). ‘Mr. G. M. Tweddell thus relates the history of an apparition which with fitting retributive justice haunted a certain Yorkshire farmer. Read More »

Tunnel Between Finchale Abbey and Durham Cathedral

The following tunnel legend was printed in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders’ by William Henderson (1879). ‘There was a wild legend in my native city of a subterranean passage between Finchale Abbey and the cathedral of Durham, and of an attempt to penetrate it. Read More »

Awd Simmon Beeather

A Glossary of Words used in Holderness (1877) gives the following description for the word Simmon and mentions an associated ghost. ‘Simmon, pounded brick or tiles, used by brick-layers for colouring the mortar. Beating simmon was formerly the hard labour punishment in Beverley Borough Gaol. Read More »

Fimber Crossroads

The following extract is taken from ‘History of Fimber. A treatise on Agricultural Improvements, Memories of Remarkable Events and Village Tales' by T. Edmondson (1857), in which he describes local folklore concerning the haunting of the crossroads at Fimber. Read More »

Ba’l Hill, Neolithic Round Barrow

The Neolithic round barrow at Wold Newton stands nearly three meters and has a diameter of around 40 meters. It stands beside an intermittently flowing stream known as the Gypsey Race. It was excavated in 1894 by JR Mortimer.

Willy Howe (Willie Howe or Willey-Hou), Neolithic Round Barrow

Found between Burton Fleming and Wold Newton, Willy Howe is a large Neolithic round barrow which stands close to the Gypsy Race. Read More »

The Fairy Banquet

The following extract has appeared in many books on folklore and is attributed to William of Newburgh (or William of Newbridge, depending on who you read). William of Newburgh was born in Bridlington in 1136 Read More »

Gypsy Race

The Gypsy runs from the Great Wold Valley and out into the North Sea at Bridlington. Bad fortune is said follow when the Gypsey Race flows. The following description of the Gypsey Race was published as response to a letter in the Bridlington Free Press on Wednesday 21 May 2008. Read More »

The Living Apparition of Rev. Dr. Hugh Astley, Vicar of East Rudham

On 26 December 1908 an apparition was witnessed outside the vicarage in East Rudham. The apparition, witnessed by several people was identified as Rev. Dr. Hugh Astley, the Vicar of East Rudham. Astley had recently been in a railway accident, bt was not dead, so this was a strange experience involving the apparition of a living person, known all three witnesses. Read More »

St. Wilfrid's Parish Church, Calverley

St. Wilfrid's Parish Church is a Grade II listed building, the earliest parts of which date from the 11th or 12th century, though there may have been an earlier structure on the site. Read More »

Richard Cloudesley The Islington Ghost

The ghost of Richard Cloudesley is associated with the parish church of St Mary in Islington. The account of the haunting extracted below is taken from a publication entitled ‘The Islington ghost! A short account of the burial of a gentleman [R. Cloudesley] with a relation of several strange appearances which followed! (1842)’. Read More »

Monkton Heathfield Ghost (1923)

The following article entitled ‘Lively Christmas “Ghost”’ was published in the Dundee Courier on Monday 24 December 1923. ‘Occupants Driven From Their New Home. Owner Struck On The Neck With Orange. Read More »

Hull Christmas Traditions

According to 'County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ edited by Eliza Glutch. 'On Christmas morning in Hull the children come in droves, pealing at your door-bell in order to wish you "a merry Christmas." The following is a favourite doggerel: Read More »

Church of St. Andrew, Bugthorpe

It has been suggested that burying someone face down is a sign of disrespect for the deceased and a way to possibly humiliate them. One such burial may have taken place in Bugthorpe (or Buckthorpe) Churchyard according to Rev. J. W. Appleford in his 1880 book 'A Brief Account of the Parish and Church of St. Read More »

East Yorkshire News Year's Traditions

The following New Year traditions from East Yorkshire were published in 'County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ which was edited by Eliza Glutch.

All peacock feathers must be thrown out before New Year's Day, or else you will have ill luck.
  Read More »

Priory Church of St Mary, Bridlington

The Priory Church of St Mary is a Grade I listed building and stands on the site of an Augustine Priory founded in 1113 and dissolved during the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538. There is a story associated with the Priory Church and the name for Bridlington folk, Bolliton (or Bollington, Burlington) Jackdaws” Read More »

William de Lindholme (Lindholme Willie)

There have been two ghosts referred to as Lindholme Willie. One is usually associated with what is thought by some to be a Polish WWII bomber crewman and the second a hermit known as William de Lindholme. Read More »

RAF Lindholme and Lindholme Willie

There are possibly two ghosts from the Lindhome area that have been referred to as Lindholme Willie, or a variation of that name. The first is associated with the story of a hermit known as William or William de Lindholme who’s ghost was said to haunt the moor. Read More »

Dark Coven by Nick Brown

Dark Coven by Nick Brown

In an isolated country house two miles from the cursed, ancient Skendleby burial mound a group of successful women are establishing a spiritual community. What could possibly go wrong? Read More »



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