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Hampton Wood Exorcism

The following account was extracted from ‘The Ghost World’ by T F Thiselton Dyer 1893 ‘Referring to spots where murders have taken place, a Shropshire tradition informs us how, at a certain house at Hampton's Wood, near Ellesmere, six illegitimate children were murdered by their parents, and buried in a garden. Read More »

Headless Coachman and Roper's Rest

The following description of an old haunting story was published in The Ghost World by T. F. Thiselton Dyer (1893). ‘A tragic case is recorded by Crofton Croker, who tells how, many years ago, a clergyman belonging to St. Catharine's Church, Dublin, resided at the old Castle of Donore, in the vicinity of that city. Read More »

Obrick's Colt

According to ‘Haunted Churches (1939)’ by Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965), ‘Cuthery Hollow and a near-by church-cemetery by a phantom in the form of a colt. According to a tradition, a titled lady was buried with some of her most valuable jewels in a vault of Fitz church. Obrick, the parish clerk, knowing this, broke open the tomb and robbed the corpse. Read More »

Llanilar Church

The following account from ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939) by Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to a Devil tradition associated with three churches in close proximity, though he does not name the individual church. Read More »

Llangadock

Elliott O'Donnell gives the following description of a submerged town near Llangadock in his 1939 book ‘Haunted Churches’. Read More »

St Martin’s Church, West Drayton

The church of St Martin dates from the 13th century. The following account of a phantom bird associated with the building was published in ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939) by Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965). ‘ONE of the most remarkable cases of haunting in a church occurred at West Drayton, near Uxbridge, in the middle of the eighteenth century. Read More »

Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

I've known Mel for over 20 years, meeting though ASSAP while investigating paranormal cases in the North of England. We share a passion for collecting stories and coming from Lancashire myself I have been looking forward to reading Mel's new book and revisiting some of the old stories, coming across some new ones..and of course, I can now add the book to my collection! Read More »

Gill Hill And The Radlett Murder

In ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939), Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to ‘Gill Hill, the scene of the horrible Weare murder, and said to be still haunted by the ghosts of Weare and his murderers, Thurtell and Probert’. The Radlett or Elstree murder took place around Gills Hill Lane in Radlett on 24 October 1823. Read More »

St Giles Church, South Mimms

The Parish Church of St Giles dates from the 13th and 15th century. In Haunted Churches (1939), Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to the churchyard and surrounding area being haunted. Read More »

All Saints Church, Bristol

All Saints Church is a Grade II listed building with parts dating back to 12th century. Before the dissolution, All Saints was associated with the society of the Kalendaries, who built a public library here. Read More »

St Thomas’s Church, Regent Street

St Thomas's Regent Street is now demolished and the parish amalgamated with those of St Peter's, Great Windmill Street and the St Anne’s Church, Soho. The church received the following mention by Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) in his Haunted Churches (1939). Read More »

The Church of St. Nicholas, Guisborough

The church of St. Nicholas is a Grade II listed building dating from the 15th or 16th century, though it was extensively rebuilt or restored in the 18th century and early 20th century. Joining the church to the South are the ruins of Guisborough Priory which was dedicated to St Mary. Read More »

St. Mary's Church, Scarborough

St Mary's Church is a Grade I listed building dating from the 12th century, though much of it was rebuilt in the 17th century after it was damaged during the siege ofScarborough Castle during the English Civil War in 1644. In ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939), Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to a woman keeping vigil at St Mary’s on St Mark’s Eve. Read More »

Holy Cross and St Mary Church , Quainton

Dating from the 14th century, the parish church of St Mary the Virgin and Holy Cross was reputedly involved in a strange experience in the late 17th century. The incident involved Susanna (nee Brawne) (died circa 1671) and her husband Sir John Dormer of Lee Grange (died Leghorn (Livorno) 1675), who are interred in the church. Read More »

All Saints Church, York

The 14th century All Saints’ Church is a Grade I listed building. According to ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939) by Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) ‘All sorts of queer stories are told, too, of the other Pavement church, All Saints. Read More »

St. Crux Church, York

The 15th century St Crux Church was demolished in 1887 and some of its stone was then used to build St Crux Parish Hall. Writing in 1939, Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) mentioned the following ghostly traditions associated with St Crux in his ‘Haunted Churches’. ‘All kinds of stories have at various times been circulated regarding ghostly happenings at St. Read More »

St. George's Church, York

On George Street stands the Roman Catholic Church of St George, across from the site of an earlier 16th century St George’s Church which fell into ruin. With the graveyard (which still survives) of this original St George’s was thought to be buried Richard "Dick" Turpin (Died 7 April 1739). Read More »

The Cage, St Osyth

The following article by Sam Balls was published in the Essex Chronicle, 1 February 2016. It is entitled ‘Britain's most haunted house and former medieval prison is up for sale in Essex for £180,000’

Ghost hunters can snap up Britain's most haunted house after the Essex-based creepy cottage was put on the market for £180,000. Read More »

St Mary the Virgin Church, Ilmington

In ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939), Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) gives the following brief description of a haunting at the 12th century parish church of St Mary the Virgin. ‘THE parish church of Ilmington in Warwickshire was, and some say still, at times, is, haunted by the ghost of a parish clerk who died in 1793. Read More »

Headless Coachman, Norwich

The following extract is taken from ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). ‘The Headless Coach, or more correctly coach with headless coachman, appears again in Norfolk. Mr. Read More »

Swine Drawn Coach (1684)

In his ‘Memorials, or the memorable things that fell out within this island of Britain from 1638 – 1684’ (Published 1818), Robert Law quotes the diary of Jacob Bee of Durham, who refers to a strange experience that was deemed a portent of death. “John Borrow departed this life the 17th day of January being Satterday this yeare 1684 and twas reported y’he see a coa Read More »

Langley Hall, Burnhope

The fortified manor house known as Langley Hall is a Grade II listed ruin, dating from the early 16th century. Read More »

The Ladies Bow-Brig-Syke

The following story was published in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). ‘About half-a mile to the east of Maxton, a small rivulet runs across the turnpike-road, at a spot called Bow-brig-syke. Read More »

Laird Harry Gilles

The following was published in ‘Scottish Fairy and Folk Tales’ by George Douglas (1901) but he cites ‘Folk-lore of the Northern Counties’by William Henderson’ (1879).’THE Laird Harry Gilles of Littledean was extremely fond of hunting. Read More »

Littledean Tower

The 15th century Littledean Tower is now a ruin, but this fortified house was the home of the Kers of Littledean. The following story about Littledean was published in ‘Notes on the Folk-lore of the Northern Counties of England and the Borders by William Henderson’ (1879). Read More »



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