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The Fox and Hounds, Riseley

According to the following article entitled ‘The other spirits found in your local’ was published in the Bedfordshire on Sunday, 23 June 2013. ‘The Fox and Hounds in Riseley is said to be haunted by a nurse, who was knocked over by a vehicle and brought inside where Read More »

The Oakley Arms, Harrold

According to the following article entitled ‘The other spirits found in your local’ which was published in Bedfordshire on Sunday, 23 June 2013. ‘The Oakley Arms in Harrold has been investigated by The Phantom Society, who claim that the pub is haunted by former landl Read More »

The Chequers Public Inn, Wootton

Dating from the 17th century, The Chequers Inn in Wootton has a reputation of being haunted. The Bedfordshire local government website refers to an article published in 2000 in the Charles Wells Ltd in house magazine called Pint Pot (WL722/100). Read More »

Gladstone Street

'Another possible Black Tom sighting took place nearby in a private residence along Gladstone Street in the mid 1980's. This time, a man awoke to find what he thought was an intruder in his bedroom. Read More »

Cineworld, Bedford

According to the following article extract from Andrew Watt’s ‘15 ghost sightings in Bedford’ (Bedfordshire on Sunday, 10 March 2015). Read More »

Black Tom, Tavistock Street, Union Street and Clapham Road Junction

According to Andrew Watt’s article entitled ‘15 ghost sightings in Bedford’, which was published in Bedfordshire on Sunday (10 March 2015). ‘This junction of Tavistock Street, Union Street and Clapham Road was the location of the Read More »

Chaucer Road, Bedford

The following extract is taken from an article by Andrew Watt entitled ‘15 ghost sightings in Bedford’, which was published in ‘Bedfordshire on Sunday’ (10 March 2015). ‘In 1972, a mother living in Chaucer Road who was woken by her baby's screams, spotted a shadowy hand cross the wall of the room and come to rest on the baby's face. Read More »

Bedford Hospital

Officially opening in August 1803, Bedford Hospital was built with £8000 bequeathed in the will of Samuel Whitbread (Died 1796). The hospital has of course grown extensively over the last 200 years and now houses 440 beds and caters for a population of about 270,000. Read More »

The Cross Inn, Beeston

Now closed, the Grade II listed Cross Inn dated from 1792 and could be found at 6 High Road in Beeston. Whilst it was a pub there are stories of the beer barrel taps being turned off, whiskey bottles falling from their shelf and the toilet doors locking and hence trapping the occupant.

Middlesbrough Central Library

The Central Library (or Carnegie Library) was Middlesbrough’s first purpose built public library and it was opened on 8 May 1912 by Alderman Amos Hinton (Born in Tring 1844 – Died 1919). There are now rumors that this building is haunted and one of the rooms is referred to as The Ghost Room. Read More »

The Golden Pheasant, Biggleswade

The Golden Pheasant at 71 High Street is a Grade II listed building dating from the 18th century. There have apparently been reports of the sound of singing coming from the bar when it is empty and footsteps again from an area with nobody present to make them.

Bignor Hill

According to Sylvanus Urban’s ‘Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Chronicle (1816)‘The old inhabitants of the place have a tradition now nearly lost that a large Dragon had its den on Bignor Hill and that marks of its folds were to be seen on the hill a relick of remote antiquity and of Celtic origin.’

St Andrew's Parish Church, Alfriston

St Andrew’s Parish Church is a Grade I listed building dating back to 1370. It was built in a cruciform shape and is referred to as The Cathedral of the Downs. There is a siting legend attached to St Andrews Church dating back to its original construction. Read More »

Deans Place Country Hotel

Dating from the 17th century and formerly being the moated manor house of a large farm estate, the Grade II listed Deans Place has been a hotel since the start of the 20th century. The building has a reputation of being haunted by a female figure in a long blue dress or robe. Read More »

A23 Pyecombe

According to the BBC News Website ‘The UK's most haunted road is listed as the A23 between London and Brighton, where ghostly figures include a small girl with no hands or feet, a figure in a white trench coat and a figure in cricketer's clothing.’

At Pyecombe apparently a strange figure has been seen scampering across the road.

Ye Olde Smugglers Inne, Alfriston

Partially dating from 1358, and originally known as The Market Cross Inn or Market Cross House, this public house changed its name in the 1920’s and now reflects its association with Stanton Collins, the leader of the Alfriston gang and their smuggling activities. Read More »

The White Way, Alfriston

The White Way is a road running between Alfriston and Seaford, which according to local legend has a reputation for being haunted. According to tradition, one Midsummers Eve, a young man, who was the heir to the Chowne* estate was killed with his dog (possibly a white terrier) near Dean’s Place and quickly buried in a shallow grave. Read More »

Knurre-Murre

The following Danish story was published in ‘Popular Rhymes and Nursery Tales’ by J. O. Halliwell-Phillipps (1849). ‘An analogous story is found in the people-literature of Denmark. Near a town called Lyng is the hill of Brondhoë, inhabited by the trold-folk, or imps. Read More »

Borough Hill

According to ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland,‘IN the vestry of Frensham Church, in Surrey, on the north side of the chancel, is an extraordinary great kettle or caldron, which the inhabitants say, by tradition, was brought Read More »

A Witch-Hare at Sedgefield

The following account of the story is extracted from ‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘A similar incident* is said to have happened at the small market town of Sedgefield, about seventy years ago. A party out coursing hares raised one in a field near that place, towards which they were astonished to see that it ran direct. Read More »

Ceddesfield Hall

Ceddesfield Hall is a Grade II listed building dating from the 18thcentury. Now a community centre, Ceddesfield Hall was originally built as a rectory for Reverend George Barrington. The previous rectory which this replaced burned down in 1793. It was this older building that was associated with the ‘Pickled Parson’. Read More »

To Counteract Witchcraft

The following account of the story is extracted from‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). 'A case occurred in old Dundas Street, Monkwearmouth, twenty-four years ago, of a child believed to be witched, so that it was shrivelled up to anatomy. Read More »

The Witch of Easington

The following story was published in ‘Legends Superstitions of the County of Durham’ by William Brockie (1886). ‘Mrs. Read More »

Upton Snodsbury Fairies

The following story concerning a fairy encounter was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

Inkberrow Siting Legend

In his‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890), Edwin Sidney Hartland gives the following account of a siting legend. Read More »



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