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The Parish of St Andrew, Leyland

The Parish of St Andrew in Leyland dates from 1220, though it is thought a church has been on this site since the 12th Century. The church has had several alterations over the centuries, but what I want to concentrate on is the initial construction of the first church and the siting legends associated with it. Read More »

The King of the Fairies

The following folktale entitled 'The King of the Fairies' was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878). Read More »

The Unbidden Guest

The following folktale entitled 'The Unbidden Guest' was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878). 'On a little lane leading from the town of Clitheroe there once lived a noted 'cunning man,' to whom all sorts of applications were made, not only by the residents, but also by people from distant places, for the fame of the wizard had spread over the whole country side. Read More »

Cymbeline's Castle (Cymbeline's Mound, Cymbeline’s Mount or Belinus's Castle)

Cymbeline's Mound is the site of a small Norman motte and bailey castle. The motte or mound is 42 meters in diameter with a ditch on three sides. There is a Devil legend associated with this site. It is said that if you run around the mound seven times the Devil will appear.

Goring-by-Sea Dancing Ghost

The following article entitled ‘Ghostly Goring scared out of its wits’ was published in the Worthing Herald, on Tuesday 30 October 2007. It concerns a spree of ghost sightings in Goring-by-Sea at the end of the 1920’s. The article mentions that sightings took place around Goring Hall. Read More »

Th' Skriker (Shrieker)

The following story entitled "Th' Skriker (Shrieker)" was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878).  'On a fine night, about the middle of December, many years ago, a sturdy-looking young fellow left Chipping for his cottage, three or four miles away, upon the banks of the Hodder. Read More »

The Bee Hole Boggart

There is story that many years ago in the Burnley area, a woman known as Old Bet was snatched and killed by The Bee Hole Boggart.  Bits of her skin were then said to have been found bung on a rose bush.

Nogworth Cross

Only the base remains of The Nogworth Cross (aka Northwood Cross) which can be found beside a lane near Shay Lane and the Todmorden Road.  According to ‘A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6’ (1911), ‘In the Extwistle part, on the high moorland, are some tumuli and the sites of supposed British and Roman camps; there is another camp above Thursden. Read More »

Lee Green Scar, Extwistle

According to Leslie Chapple 'Romantic Old Houses and Their Tales', ‘In 1902, in a lecture to the Burnley Literary and Scientific Club, Mr. Read More »

The Sands of Cocker

The following story entitled ‘The Sands of Cocker’ was published in ‘Goblin Tales of Lancashire’ by James Bowker (1878). Read More »

A4146 Monk, Edlesborough

A phantom monk in a black habit is said to have been witnessed by a car driver near the parish church of St Mary the Virgin as he drove through Edlesborough on the A4146 in the 1970’s.  The monk vanished when the driver stopped and shone a torch at it.

Extwistle Hall

Now in ruins, the Grade II listed, Tudor style Extwistle Hall was built by the Parker family in the 16th century.   Once land owned by Kirkstall Abbey, Exwistle passed to William Ramsden following the Dissolution of the Monasteries and then to Robert Parker. The Hall remained their seat until the tragic event of 1718. Read More »

The Bell, Edlesborough

Now a private residence, The Bell was a Grade II listed public house dating from the mid 18th century. The Luton Paranormal website refers to a time after 1984 when John and Margaret Pilgrim lived there. Read More »

Slaptonbury Mill

There is a ghost legend attached to Slaptonbury Mill, of which not even ruins remain. Read More »

A4146 Crossroads, Edlesborough

The Dagnall road near Edlesborough may be haunted by a phantom black car.  In 1961 Mr Stanley Prescott from Dunstable and his wife were driving along the A4146 when, as they approached the B489 junction, Mr Prescott was forced to take his car off the road and through a hedge by an oncoming vehicle. Read More »

Jack the Leather, Edlesborough

Jack the Leather was a highwayman who is said to have been caught whilst hiding in the stables of Church Farm. According to tradition, soldiers noticed the lathered farm horses that Jack had been exercising each night by riding them around the farm’s spring-fed moat. He was captured and dragged to a Gibbet at either Ivinghoe Beacon, or Gallows Hill. Read More »

Dick Turpin, Edlesborough

On dark nights it is said that the ghost of Dick Turpin rides the road leading from the 13th century St Mary the Virgin Parish Church towards the Tring Road. Local legend says he would hide in the attic of Butler's Manor at Northall and watch for potential coaches to hold up.

Gallows Hill, Ivinghoe

Gallows Hill stands 615 feet above sea level and it is thought to have the remains of a Bronze Age barrow on it, bones from which were discovered in the 19th century. At one post medieval time the hill is said to have mounted a gallows from which it gets its name.  It is from this time that the story of its haunting is thought to derive from. Read More »

Ivinghoe Beacon

The National Trails Ridgeway footpath begins and ends at Ivinghoe Beacon on Beacon Hill. The remains of a late Bronze Age to Early Iron Age univallate hill fort and numerous barrows can be found here. The ramparts are 2m high in places and it is thought that the main ditch around the fort would have been 3.1 meters m wide and 2.2 meters deep. Read More »

Stert Crossroads

According to the BBC Domesday Project, a ‘ghost lurks at Stert crossroads where once a carriage overturned killing all who rode in it. Subsequently, suicides, fatalities etc have regularly occurred.’

Sewell's Lane, Sydenham

According to the BBC Domesday Project, Sewell’s Lane has a reputation of being haunted and ‘People occasionally experience 'a cold, ghostly feeling' on this lonely thoroughfare.’

The Bird in Hand, Chinnor

The Bird In Hand public house on Lower Road closed in 2000. According to the BBC Domesday Project, ‘A young baby is believed to have died in an inn called 'The Bird in Hand' in Chinnor; the sound of its crying has been heard several times. Read More »

Uffington Castle

Uffington Castle is an early Iron Age hill fort covering about 32,000 square metres. It was once protected by timber walls on top of the surviving banks and ditches, and faced with sarcen stones. It is likely that the tribe who created the White Horse once lived within this hill fort. Read More »

Liddington Castle

Liddington Castle is an early Iron Age hill fort covering roughly 7.5 acres and 909 ft above sea level. Though there is no archaeological evidence to support the fact, it has been argued that Liddington Castle could be the probable site for the Battle of Badon (aka Siege of Mount Badon), first mentioned by Gildas in the 6th Century. Read More »

Devil’s Punchbowl

The Devil’s Punchbowl is a large hollow, which according to legend , the Devil disappeared within after ploughing Grim’s Ditch (or Devil’s Ditch) across the Berkshire Downs.



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