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Sham Castle

The Sham Castle at Bathampton is a Grade II listed building dating from 1762. It was built for the entrepreneur and philanthropist, Ralph Allen (Born 1693 – Died 29 June 1764), who perhaps haunts it still. The following extract is taken from an article by David Brandon and Alan Brooke which was published in The Guardian on 31 October 2009. Read More »

Shug Monkey

According to tradition Slough Hill Lane and the area between between Balsham and West Wrattling was haunted by a black dog with the face of a monkey. It was described in James Wentworth Day’s 'Here are Ghosts & Witches' (1954) as 'a cross between a big rough-coated dog and a monkey with big shining eyes. Read More »

Melton Shock

The following is extracted from County Folklore: Suffolk (1893). 'In Melton stands the 'Horse & Groom' inn - in the days of toll-bar gates (thirty years ago) occupied by one Master Fisher. Read More »

Wicken Fen Black Dog

Wicken Fen is a wetland area which has been cared for by the National Trust since 1899. A Black Dog is said to haunt the area around Wicken Fen.

Wicken Fen Lantern Man

According to folk tradition a variation of Will o' the Wisp referred as the Lantern Man can be seen on Wicken Fen enticing people into the reed beds where they drown.

Holwell Mouth Wood

A Phantom Black Dog known as Black Shug is said to haunt Holwell Mouth wood at either dusk or dawn.

Holwell Mouth Holy Well

The well at Holwell Mouth is the source of the River Smite and described as being a chalybeate spring. It is said that the well was visited for its medicinal waters and there used to be a stone table and seats for the visitors to use. In 1403 the vicarage was granted land called Well Dole and there are records of a Dole building receiving 10 shillings a year in 1790 for its upkeep.

Wycoller Guytrash

A phantom Black Dog known as Guytrash (or Shriker or Skriker) was said to haunt the lanes and fields around Wycoller, Parson Lee and Height Laithe. As with many Black Dogs, seeing Guytrash was thought to be an ill omen foretelling the death of someone close to the witness.

Bunting Nook Black Dog

A Black Dog with large eyes is said to have been encountered on Bunting Nook

Old Shock

According to County Folklore: Suffolk (1893) ‘Old Shock is a mischievous goblin, in the shape of a great dog, or of a calf, haunting highways and footpaths in the dark. Read More »

St Audries Black Dog

In ‘Unexplained Phenomena: A Rough Guide Special’ (2000) by John Michell, Bob Rickard and Robert J M Rickard, refer to a Black Dog that is thought to have haunted the road between St Audries and Perry Farm. They quoted their source as the Somerset Volume of County Folklore. The Dog is thought to have been witnessed by two people in 1960 shortly before their deaths.

Woolpit Road Black Dog

A old resident of Clopton Green is said to have encountered something with two saucer shaped eyes on the road to Woolpit. The description of saucer shaped eyes is often associated with Black Dogs. This thing apparently told the man that "I shall want you within a week." Being an omen of death is also associated with Black Dogs. The man apparently died the following night.

The Footless Ghost of Dallinghoo

According to ‘County Folk-Lore: Suffolk’ (1893) edited by Lady Camilla Gurdon, ‘In years gone by there lived at Dallinghoo a "Widow Shawe who committed suicide by cutting her throat. She now haunts the lanes and flits by without feet. She has been seen by many, and amongst those whom she has startled is Mrs. H., a thatcher's wife. Read More »

Dallinghoo Treasure

In ‘County Folk-Lore: Suffolk’ (1893), Lady Camilla Gurdon gives the following story ‘Beneath a post of a high gate in Dallinghoo lies a hidden treasure; the ghost of its former owner haunts the spot and twelve clergymen have unitedly failed to lay the spirit.’

Formby Old Trash

According to the following extract taken from an article by David Brandon and Alan Brooke which was published in The Guardian on 31 October 2009. ‘Formby stands on the coast between Liverpool and Southport and is noted for its extensive sand dunes. This is where the unholy hound known as "Old Trash" gets its exercise, spreading ill fortune among all those who see it. Read More »

The Headless Horses Of Boulge Hall

The following account of a haunting was published in ‘County Folk-Lore: Suffolk’ (1893) edited by Lady Camilla Gurdon. Her source was a Mr Redstone. ‘At Boulge Hall, upon the stroke of twelve at midnight, a coach drawn by a pair of headless horses, and driven by a headless coachman, who dismounts to open the lodge gates, takes back the ghost of the late owner, Mr. Read More »

Hampton Wood Exorcism

The following account was extracted from ‘The Ghost World’ by T F Thiselton Dyer 1893 ‘Referring to spots where murders have taken place, a Shropshire tradition informs us how, at a certain house at Hampton's Wood, near Ellesmere, six illegitimate children were murdered by their parents, and buried in a garden. Read More »

Headless Coachman and Roper's Rest

The following description of an old haunting story was published in The Ghost World by T. F. Thiselton Dyer (1893). ‘A tragic case is recorded by Crofton Croker, who tells how, many years ago, a clergyman belonging to St. Catharine's Church, Dublin, resided at the old Castle of Donore, in the vicinity of that city. Read More »

Obrick's Colt

According to ‘Haunted Churches (1939)’ by Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965), ‘Cuthery Hollow and a near-by church-cemetery by a phantom in the form of a colt. According to a tradition, a titled lady was buried with some of her most valuable jewels in a vault of Fitz church. Obrick, the parish clerk, knowing this, broke open the tomb and robbed the corpse. Read More »

Llanilar Church

The following account from ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939) by Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to a Devil tradition associated with three churches in close proximity, though he does not name the individual church. Read More »

Llangadock

Elliott O'Donnell gives the following description of a submerged town near Llangadock in his 1939 book ‘Haunted Churches’. Read More »

St Martin’s Church, West Drayton

The church of St Martin dates from the 13th century. The following account of a phantom bird associated with the building was published in ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939) by Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965). ‘ONE of the most remarkable cases of haunting in a church occurred at West Drayton, near Uxbridge, in the middle of the eighteenth century. Read More »

Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

Lancashire Folk by Melanie Warren

I've known Mel for over 20 years, meeting though ASSAP while investigating paranormal cases in the North of England. We share a passion for collecting stories and coming from Lancashire myself I have been looking forward to reading Mel's new book and revisiting some of the old stories, coming across some new ones..and of course, I can now add the book to my collection! Read More »

Gill Hill And The Radlett Murder

In ‘Haunted Churches’ (1939), Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to ‘Gill Hill, the scene of the horrible Weare murder, and said to be still haunted by the ghosts of Weare and his murderers, Thurtell and Probert’. The Radlett or Elstree murder took place around Gills Hill Lane in Radlett on 24 October 1823. Read More »

St Giles Church, South Mimms

The Parish Church of St Giles dates from the 13th and 15th century. In Haunted Churches (1939), Elliott O'Donnell (27 February 1872 - 8 May 1965) refers to the churchyard and surrounding area being haunted. Read More »



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