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Rostherne Mere

Rostherne Mere which sits to the north of Tatton Park has a Mermaid story attached to it. In ‘The Story of My Life, volumes 4-6 (1900)’, Augustus J. C. Read More »

Wentworth Woodhouse

Wentworth Woodhouse is a Grade I listed building and with somewhere between 300 and 365 rooms, five miles of corridors and 250,000 square feet of floor space, it is one of the largest houses in the United Kingdom. Read More »

Old Faithful Inn

The following story entitled 'Ghost Stories Give Old Faithful Inn A Haunting Reputation' was published in the Deseret News (4 July 1991).

Her white wedding dress rippled ever so gently as she drifted across the crow's nest high in the upper reaches of the Old Faithful Inn. Read More »

Belvoir Castle

Belvoir Castle is home to David Manners, 11th Duke of Rutland, Marquess of Granby. It has been the seat of the Dukes of Rutland for three hundred years and the home of the Manners family over for over five hundred. In ‘The Story of My Life, volumes 4-6’ (1900), Augustus J. C. Hare gives the following story of a haunt like experience at Belvoir. Read More »

St Oswald's (Old) Church, Fulford

Now a private residence, St Oswald's (Old) Church, dates from 1150 and its nave, and west tower, were originally from St Mary's Abbey. William Camidge related the following story. Read More »

Headless Man, Frodingham

Between Frodingham and Foston a headless man haunts the road, but he has only been seen once. — [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890)]

Headless Horseman, Atwick

Between Atwick and Skipsea there races along-occasionally the headless man mounted on a swift horse. - [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890)]

Halliwell Boggle

Between Atwick and Bewholme, at the foot of the hill on which Atwick church stands, there is a spring and pool of water overhung by willows haunted by the Halliwell Boggle. A boggle is an imaginary hobgoblin, without any special form, causing fear and terror. — [Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890)]

Willie Sled's Dog

'The boggle infesting Brigham Lane end, where four roads meet, is a white dog known as Willie Sled's dog. Willie Sled used to attend to those who came to the Brigham sand-pit ; and as nearly every pit in the Riding has its goblin, this one is named after him.' — 'Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890). Read More »

Screaming Skull of Lund

I cannot find any details about this story apart from the following reference Folk-Lore of East Yorkshire' by John Nicholson (1890). 'There is a similar tradition (to that of Burton Agnes Hall) respecting the Manor House at Lund, where the skull has been walled u Read More »

St John's Well, Harpham

The well of St John of Beverley can be found beside the road on the east side of Harpham. St John (died 7 May 721) was born in Beverley and on his feast day (7th May) it is decorated and a procession of the choir and congregation of Beverley Minster make their way to it from the church in Harpham. Read More »

St. Peter's and St. Helen's Wells, Barmby-on-the-Marsh

In her ‘County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’, Eliza Glutch refers to the following two references for the healing wells of Barmby-on-the-Marsh. Read More »

Cobbler’s Well

The following story of Cobbler’s Well was printed in ‘County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ which was edited by Eliza Glutch. ‘In a hollow on Beverley Westwood is a stone trough, into which a spring of exceedingly cold pure water once flowed abundantly. Read More »

St Catherine's Church, Barmby Moor

Dating from around 1272, St Catherine's Parish Church was largely rebuilt in 1850 replacing much of the original Norman building. In the churchyard, just south of the main door is a stone which has been speculated may have been a place of pagan worship. Read More »

Underwear-Stealing Ghosts

The following article by Faye Preston entitled ’“Underwear-stealing ghosts made my life hell”: Hull woman forced to move seven times’ was published in the Hull Daily Mail on 9 August 2014.
Read More »

The Mistley Thorn Hotel

The Mistley Thorn Hotel dates from 1723 and was originally a coaching house. In an article by Emily Talbut entitled ‘The 14 most haunted places in Essex to visit this Hallowe'en’, (13 October 2014, Essex Chronicle) the Mistley Thorn Hotel is referred to as being haunted by the Witch Finder General, Matthew Hopkins, who was buried in Mistley on 12th August 1647. Read More »

The Red Lion, Manningtree

The Red Lion is a Grade II listed building and the oldest pub in Manningtree, dating back to 1605 and the time of Matthew Hopkins and his witch trials. According to the Red Lion’s website ‘The inn is also mentioned in a book of 1647 written by Matthew Hopkins on the scourge of witchcraft. Hopkins, a native of Manningtree, was a lawyer known as the Witch Hunter General. Read More »

Easington Hall

Easington Hall was the seat of the Overton family and although I don’t know exactly where it was in Easington, I have come across a reference to it being on the principle street in the village. Read More »

All Saint's Church, Easington

Originally dating from 1190AD, the Parish Church of All Saints is a Grade I listed building. The grave yard attached to the church was used up to 1883, after which a closure order was made. Read More »

Maldon East and Heybridge Railway Station

The impressive Maldon station was opened in 1848 by the Maldon, Witham & Braintree Railway Company and closed on 7 September 1964. Read More »

Brede Place

Originally dating from the 14th century, Brede Place is a Grade II listed building that was then rebuilt in the 15th century by Sir Robert Oxenbridge, father of Sir Goddard Oxenbridge, the Bede Giant. For a time the house was associated with smugglers and some haunt like stories were told to keep the locals away. Read More »

Brede Ogre

According to local legend, a child eating ogre in Brede Park was identified as the Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex, Sir Goddard Oxenbridge of Brede Place. Said to have stood seven foot tall (most likely just over 5 foot), he was also known as the Brede Giant. Oxenbridge died on 10 February 1531 and his tomb (constructed in 1537) can be found in the Parish Church of St George in Brede. Read More »

The Bell Inn, Thorpe-le-Soken

Dating from the 16th century and originally thought to have been a Guild Hall confiscated by King Henry VIII, the Bell Inn is a Grade I listed building with a reputation of being haunted. The following description was published on 13 October 2014 in the Essex Chronicle within an article by Emily Talbut entitled ‘The 14 most haunted places in Essex to visit this Hallowe'en’. Read More »

Parish Church of St Nicholas, Canewdon

The Parish Church of St Nicholas in Canewdon dates from the 14th century and according to tradition and local legend, has associations with ghosts, witchcraft and the Devil. The following description of Canewdon was published on 13 October 2014 in the Essex Chronicle within an article by Emily Talbut entitled ‘The 14 most haunted places in Essex to visit this Hallowe'en’ Read More »

Chelmsford’s Civic Theatre

The Civic Theatre in Chelmsford which hosted its first production on 3 September 1962 is reputedly haunted. The following description was published on 13 October 2014 in the Essex Chronicle within an article by Emily Talbut entitled ‘The 14 most haunted places in Essex to visit this Hallowe'en’. Read More »



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