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Frensham Common Round Barrows

There is a group of four Round Barrows on Frensham Common. Three are clustered close to each other and the fourth is found roughly 150 meters to the north of them.

Mother Ludlam's Cave

Mother Ludham’s Cave, was so named after the White Witch that was said to live in it. This small sandstone cave can be found in the Wey Valley and is also associated with the ruined Cistercian Waverley Abbey, or more correctly the spring inside it is associated with the monks that lived there. This spring was known as Ludwell and later St Mary's Well. Read More »

Devil’s Punch Bowl, Hindhead

The Devil's Punch Bowl at Hindhead is a large natural hollow with several pieces of folk lore attached to Old Nick himself. Read More »

Osebury Rock

Osebury Rock (or Rosebury Rock) is a remarkable cliff with dense woodland on the River Teme which, according to Edwin Hartland in his ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890), has an association with fairies. Read More »

A Myth of Middridge

The following story entitled ‘A Myth of Midridge’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘TALKING about fairies the other day to a nearly octogenarian female neighbour, I asked, Had she ever seen one in her youthful days? Read More »

Yan Di - The First Chinese Emperor

The legendary Yan Di or "Flame Emperor" is said to have ruled a stone age tribe around the area of Yang Tou Shan (Sheep's Head Mountain) just north of Baoji in Shaanxi province, China. There are few facts known about Yan Di as historical records do not exist from the time he supposedly lived. Read More »

Devil’s Jumps

Three small hills near Churt have been known as the Devils Jumps (or the Devils Three Jumps) since at least 1765. The highest of the three hills is known as Stony Jump. There are a few folk tales attached to these hills which explains their name. Read More »

Tom Dula (Dooley)

"Hang down your head Tom Dooley,
Hang down your head and cry,
Hang down your head Tom Dooley,
Poor boy, you're bound to die!" Read More »

Myers Flat

An article in the North Echo entitled ‘How railway builders took on the fairies’ was published on Monday 16 June 2008. It concerns the building of the Stockton and Darlington Railway in 1823 and refers to the local belief that fairies hindered progress at Myers Flat. Read More »

Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, Frensham

Inside the 13th century Church of Saint Mary the Virgin at Frensham is held a beaten copper cauldron. The medieval 19 inch deep cauldron is believed to have been used for the brewing of Church Ale and has apparently been kept in the church 'from beyond the memory of man'. Read More »

The Miller at the Professor’s Examination

THERE once came to England a famous foreign professor, and before he came he gave notice that he would examine the students of all the colleges in England. After a time he had visited all but Cambridge, and he was on his road thither to examine publicly the whole university. Read More »

The Three Wishes

A WOODMAN went to the forest to fell some timber. Just as be was applying the axe to the trunk of a huge old oak out jumped a fairy, who beseeched him with the most supplicating gestures to spare the tree. Moved more by fright and astonishment than anything else, the man consented, and as a reward for his forbearance was promised the fulfilment of his three next wishes. Read More »

The Wise Fools of Gotham

CUCKOO BUSH, near Gotham, tradition says, was planted or set to commemorate a trick which the inhabitants of Gotham put upon King John. The tale is told thus King John, passing through this place towards Nottingham, intending to go over the meadows, was prevented by the villagers, they apprehending that the ground over which a king passed was for ever after to become a public road. Read More »

The Fairy Funeral

The following story entitled ‘The Fairy Funeral’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘THE parish church of Lelant is curiously situated amidst hills of blown sand, near the entrance of the creek of Hayle. Read More »

The Pedlar of Swaffham

The following story entitled ‘The Pedlar of Swaffham’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

Whittington Stone

At the foot of Highgate Hill can be found the Whittington Stone, so named after Dick Whittington, who, according to tradition sat here and heard the bells of Bow Church which he thought were saying "Turn again, Whittington, Lord Mayor of London." The following account of the story of Dick Whittington and his cat was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Read More »

The Princess of Colchester

The following tale entitled ‘The Princess of Colchester’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘LONG before Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, there reigned in the eastern part of England a king who kept his Court at Colchester. Read More »

The Princess of Canterbury

The following tale entitled ‘The Princess of Canterbury’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. ‘IN days of yore, when this country was governed by many kings, among the rest the King of Canterbury had an only daughter, wise, fair, and beautiful. Read More »

Hackpen White Horse

The White Horse carved into Hackpen Hill dates from 1838 and was created to commemorate the coronation of Queen Victoria. The horse measures 90ft by 90ft.

Barbury Castle

Barbury Castle is an Iron Age hill fort and can be found on Barbury Hill. It was around here in 556AD that the Battle of Beran Byrig or Beranburh was fought and the Britons were defeated by the West Saxons.

The Ridgeway National Trail footpath passes through Barbury Castle.

The Roaring Bull of Bagbury

The following story entitled ‘The Roaring Bull of Bagbury’ was published in ‘English Fairy and Other Folk Tales’ (1890) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

Whiteleaf Hill Burial Mound

An oval neolithic burial mound dating from 3,750-3,100 B.C. can be foun don Whiteleaf Hill. Within the mound was buried a single male. Animal bones and pottery shards found within indicate evidence of ceremonial feasting when the mound was constructed. It was first excavated by Sir Lindsay Scott in the 1930’s and the again by Oxford Archaeology between 2002 and 2006.

The Parish of St Andrew, Leyland

The Parish of St Andrew in Leyland dates from 1220, though it is thought a church has been on this site since the 12th Century. The church has had several alterations over the centuries, but what I want to concentrate on is the initial construction of the first church and the siting legends associated with it. Read More »

The King of the Fairies

The following folktale entitled 'The King of the Fairies' was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878). Read More »

The Unbidden Guest

The following folktale entitled 'The Unbidden Guest' was published in 'Goblin Tales of Lancashire' by James Bowker (1878). 'On a little lane leading from the town of Clitheroe there once lived a noted 'cunning man,' to whom all sorts of applications were made, not only by the residents, but also by people from distant places, for the fame of the wizard had spread over the whole country side. Read More »



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