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Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre

Officially opened by HRH Prince Andrew on 28th June 1996, the new and renamed Birmingham and Midland Eye Centre on the City Hospital site, replaced the old Birmingham & Midland Eye Hospital, which had been on Church Street since 1884. Read More »

City Hospital, Birmingham

The City Hospital originally opened in 1889 as an extension to the Western Road workhouse and has been known by several names including Birmingham Union Infirmary, Dudley Road Infirmary and Dudley Road Hospital. Read More »

Hednesford Scareship

According to David Taylor's article 'Scareships or Motherships : The British phantom airship scare 1909 – 1918', one night in 1913, at 7.30pm, several people saw an airship carrying a light.

Longford Scareship

According to David Taylor's excellent article 'Scareships or Motherships : The British phantom airship scare 1909 – 1918' in February 1913, multiple witnesses reported a large, dark cigar shape in the sky.

Kinver Scareship, Staffordshire

According to David Taylor's excellent article 'Scareships or Motherships : The British phantom airship scare 1909 – 1918', in 1916, reports circulated that a German ‘Zeppelin’ had landed in the area whilst on a bombing raid.

Exhall Scareship, Warwickshire

According to David Taylor's excellent article 'Scareships or Motherships : The British phantom airship scare 1909 – 1918', in 1913, an airship or aeroplane, at a considerable height, was seen for about five minutes on a clear moonlit night at about 9.45p Read More »

Coventry Scareship, Warwickshire

According to David Taylor's article 'Scareships or Motherships : The British phantom airship scare 1909 – 1918', in May 1909, Coventry, England, tramway men reported an airship.

Small Heath Scareship, Birmingham

According to David Taylor's excellent article 'Scareships or Motherships : The British phantom airship scare 1909 – 1918', in May 1909, multiple witnesses saw a cigar shaped airship, without lights, passing overhead on several consecutive nights.

Scareships or Motherships : The British phantom airship scare 1909 – 1918

Scareship

At the turn of the 20th century, visionaries began to dream that the new science of aeronautics would bring universal peace on the Earth by love or fear. Love because as people travelled more they would get to know each other as human beings and no longer as sinister foreigners; fear, because the destructive power of aerial bombardment would render war unthinkable. Read More »

Kirroughtee Hotel Big Cat Sighting (2013)

Holidaymakers staying at Kirroughtee Hotel outside Newton Stewart had a close encounter with one of Galloway’s best kept secrets last Saturday morning - an elusive big cat.

Les Gill and his partner Linda were looking out of their bedroom window when they both clearly saw the animal in the hotel grounds. Read More »

Mothers' Hospital of the Salvation Army

Mothers' Hospital of the Salvation Army, opened as the Ivy House Maternity Hospital in 1884 at 280 Mare Street, Hackney. It changed its name to Ivy House Hospital in 1913 when it moved to 153 - 165 Lower Clapton Road, Hackney and eventually took the name Mother's Hospital in 1922. Read More »

Western Infirmary, Glasgow

The Western Infirmary is a teaching hospital in Glasgow. Mark Gould gives the following account there of a haunt like experience in his article entitled 'Ghosts of sisters past' which was published in The Guardian on 22 December 2004. Read More »

St Nidan's Old Church and The Thigh Stone

St Nidan’s Church in Llanidan is associated with a stone that had strange magical like properties including aiding fertilisation and having the power to move on its own.  Wirt Sykes in his British Goblins (1881) mentions that ‘The old British historian Nennius speaks of a stone, one of the wonders of the Isle Read More »

M2 UFO (2008)

The following article by Dan Bloom appeared on the on the Kent Online website 25 June 2013.

A woman saw a UFO "20 times the size of an aeroplane" while driving home on the M2 - but no-one else spotted it. Read More »

Trichug

Trichrug or Pen-y-bicws is a hill in the Brecon Beacons standing 415m in height. It is associated with both a stone throwing giant and local fairies. Read More »

Old Blacksmiths Shop, Gretna Green

The following article by Sue Crawford entitled 'Ghost hunt at Gretna's famous Blacksmiths Shop' was published in the News & Star on 8 August 2013.

Paranormal investigators are to hold a vigil after reports of “terrifying” incidents at Gretna Green’s famous Blacksmiths Shop Read More »

Church of St. Meilig, Llowes and Moll Walbee's Stone

The medieval church of St Meilig was rebuilt in 1853, though the bottom of the tower may be a remnant of the earlier building. Inside the church is a standing stone with a cross carved into it, which possibly dates from the 6th or 7th century. The stone which is thought to have stood at or near the site of a 6th century monastery founded by St Meilig at Croesfeilig. Read More »

Alluring Stone

The following description of the Alluring Stone appeared in 'British Goblins' (1881) by Wirt Sykes. 'In Carmarthen are still to be found traces of a belief in the Alluring Stone, whose virtue is that it will cure hydrophobia. It is represented as a soft white stone, about the size of a man s head, originally found on a farm called Dysgwylfa, about twelve miles from Carmarthen town. Read More »

The Abuela's Skeleton

A poor family once lived close to Lago de Patzcuaro, farming beans, corn and squash. There was a wife, her husband, her mother and her small son. The boy was especially fond of his grandmother (abuela) and he was the apple of her eye. They would often pick wildflowers together or go down to the lake shore and watch the boats on the water. Read More »

Uckfield Black Cat (2013)

The Sussex Express published the following article entitled 'Big Cat sighted at Uckfield' on 31 May 2013. 'A group of members of staff from Uckfield Community Hospital, were working a night shift when they glanced towards the window as something had caught their eye. Read More »

Canrig Bwt

A famous Welsh witch, who used to sleep under stone at Llanberis, in North Wales, was called Canrig Bwt, and her favourite dish at dinner- was children's brains. A certain criminal who had received a death-sentence was given the alternative of attacking this frightful creature, his life to be spared should he succeed in destroying her. Read More »

St. Tydecho Stone

In the village of Llanymawddwy, there is an ancient church dedicated to St. Tydecho, thought to be the son of Anna Pendragon, King Arthur’s sister. Wirt Sykes in British Goblins (1881) gives the following tale of St. Tydecho and a blue stone. ‘There was a stone in the valley of Mowddwy, which did good service for the church. A certain St. Read More »

Church of St David, Llanfaes

The Grade II listed Church of St David in Llanfaes dates from 1923-25. This church replaced an earlier one built in 1859. It has been suggested that this Victorian St David’s that was constructed by J Clayton, was built beside the remains of an earlier medieval church. The church at Llanfaes has been recorded as early as 1291 in the 'Ecclesia de Lanmays'. Read More »

Here Be Dragons And Ghosts...The Coiled Serpent And Otherworld Hoodies

Drakelow

Drakelow in Worcestershire derives its name from a mythological creature - the dragon. The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. In Old English wyrm means "serpent", draca means "dragon" (Skeat). Read More »

Llech Lafar, St Davids

Llech Lafar, a speaking slab of marble by the River Alun is referred to by Wirt Sykes in his ‘British Goblins’ (1881). 'The Talking Stone Llechlafar, or stone of loquacity, served as a bridge over the river Alyn, bounding the churchyard of St. David s in Pembrokeshire, on the northern side. Read More »



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