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The Fairy Banquet

The following extract has appeared in many books on folklore and is attributed to William of Newburgh (or William of Newbridge, depending on who you read). William of Newburgh was born in Bridlington in 1136 Read More »

Gypsy Race

The Gypsy runs from the Great Wold Valley and out into the North Sea at Bridlington. Bad fortune is said follow when the Gypsey Race flows. The following description of the Gypsey Race was published as response to a letter in the Bridlington Free Press on Wednesday 21 May 2008. Read More »

The Living Apparition of Rev. Dr. Hugh Astley, Vicar of East Rudham

On 26 December 1908 an apparition was witnessed outside the vicarage in East Rudham. The apparition, witnessed by several people was identified as Rev. Dr. Hugh Astley, the Vicar of East Rudham. Astley had recently been in a railway accident, bt was not dead, so this was a strange experience involving the apparition of a living person, known all three witnesses. Read More »

St. Wilfrid's Parish Church, Calverley

St. Wilfrid's Parish Church is a Grade II listed building, the earliest parts of which date from the 11th or 12th century, though there may have been an earlier structure on the site. Read More »

Richard Cloudesley The Islington Ghost

The ghost of Richard Cloudesley is associated with the parish church of St Mary in Islington. The account of the haunting extracted below is taken from a publication entitled ‘The Islington ghost! A short account of the burial of a gentleman [R. Cloudesley] with a relation of several strange appearances which followed! (1842)’. Read More »

Monkton Heathfield Ghost (1923)

The following article entitled ‘Lively Christmas “Ghost”’ was published in the Dundee Courier on Monday 24 December 1923. ‘Occupants Driven From Their New Home. Owner Struck On The Neck With Orange. Read More »

Hull Christmas Traditions

According to 'County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ edited by Eliza Glutch. 'On Christmas morning in Hull the children come in droves, pealing at your door-bell in order to wish you "a merry Christmas." The following is a favourite doggerel: Read More »

Church of St. Andrew, Bugthorpe

It has been suggested that burying someone face down is a sign of disrespect for the deceased and a way to possibly humiliate them. One such burial may have taken place in Bugthorpe (or Buckthorpe) Churchyard according to Rev. J. W. Appleford in his 1880 book 'A Brief Account of the Parish and Church of St. Read More »

East Yorkshire News Year's Traditions

The following New Year traditions from East Yorkshire were published in 'County Folk-Lore Volume VI - Examples of Printed Folk-Lore Concerning The East Riding of Yorkshire (1911)’ which was edited by Eliza Glutch.

All peacock feathers must be thrown out before New Year's Day, or else you will have ill luck.
  Read More »

Priory Church of St Mary, Bridlington

The Priory Church of St Mary is a Grade I listed building and stands on the site of an Augustine Priory founded in 1113 and dissolved during the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538. There is a story associated with the Priory Church and the name for Bridlington folk, Bolliton (or Bollington, Burlington) Jackdaws” Read More »

William de Lindholme (Lindholme Willie)

There have been two ghosts referred to as Lindholme Willie. One is usually associated with what is thought by some to be a Polish WWII bomber crewman and the second a hermit known as William de Lindholme. Read More »

RAF Lindholme and Lindholme Willie

There are possibly two ghosts from the Lindhome area that have been referred to as Lindholme Willie, or a variation of that name. The first is associated with the story of a hermit known as William or William de Lindholme who’s ghost was said to haunt the moor. Read More »

Dark Coven by Nick Brown

Dark Coven by Nick Brown

In an isolated country house two miles from the cursed, ancient Skendleby burial mound a group of successful women are establishing a spiritual community. What could possibly go wrong? Read More »

Sir Henry Vane the Younger, Shipbourne

Sir Henry Vane (Baptised 26 March 1613 – Died 14 June 1662) was an English politician and one time Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in North America. A Puritan, he had gone to New England in 1635. Returning from America in 1637, he became the Treasurer of the Royal Navy (1639) and was eventually knighted by King Charles I in 1640. Read More »

The Chequers, Sevenoaks

The Chequers is a Grade II listed building that was originally a 16th century coaching Inn. An area just outside the pub was used for public executions and some gallows stood here. According to tradition, The Chequers is haunted by the mother of an executed criminal. Read More »

Chartwell

Chartwell was bought in 1922 by Sir Winston Churchill (Born 30 November 1874 – Died 24 January 1965) and his wife Clementine (née Hozier, Born 1 April 1885 – Died 12 December 1977). Chartwell was their principal adult home and was presented to the National Trust following the death of Sir Winston in 1965. Read More »

Skendleby by Nick Brown

Skendleby by Nick Brown

In the rolling Cheshire countryside surrounding Alderley, scarred by the mansions of celebs and footballers, something buried for millenia is stirring. But something equally ancient keeps watch. Read More »

RAF West Malling

Kings Mill was built upon the site of RAF West Malling, which was formed in 1940 when Maidstone Airport was requisitioned by the military. West Malling was assigned to Fighter Command, C Sector. Following WWII it continued as an RAF base and then was used by the US Navy Air Force. It closed as a military air base in 1969 and as an airfield in the1980’s. Read More »

Old Soar Manor

Old Soar Manor is a Grade I listed building dating from the 13th century and orginally belonging to the Culpepper family. There is a ghost story associated with Old Soar Manor, from the18th century when it was owned by the Geary family. Read More »

London Biggin Hill Airport

London Biggin Hill Airport was formerly (and a small remains) RAF Biggin Hill, one of the best known World War II Air Stations from the Battle of Britain. Squadrons based here included 32 Squadron, 79 Squadron and 601 (County of London) Auxiliary Squadron. Read More »

St Mary's Church, Kemsing

The Church of Saint Mary The Virgin in Kemsing is a Grade II listed building and it is thought that some of the stones in the south wall date from 1060. There is a tradition that the church is haunted by a knight. Read More »

The Chequers Inn, Haversham

The 16th century Chequers Inn is a village pub reputedly haunted by a Roundhead from the English Civil War (1642–1651). The following description of the haunting is extracted from an article in the Kent and Sussex Courier entitled ‘The ghastly ghouls rumoured to haunt our sleepy district’ dating from 31 October 2008. Read More »

A21– A25 Junction

The following description of the haunting is extracted from an article in the Kent and Sussex Courier entitled ‘The ghastly ghouls rumoured to haunt our sleepy district’ dating from 31 October 2008. ‘The A21 hosts another unquiet spirit. Read More »

A21– Gracious Lane

The following description of the haunting is extracted from an article in the Kent and Sussex Courier entitled ‘The ghastly ghouls rumoured to haunt our sleepy district’ dating from 31 October 2008. ‘If you're in the mood for a thrill, you could take your life in your hands and drive down the A21. Read More »

Combe Bank

Combe Bank School was founded in 1924, but the Grade I listed Palladian style mansion it occupies dates from 1720 and was built for John Campbell, 4th Duke of Argyll (Born1693 – Died 9 November 1770). Read More »



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