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Hardwick Hall

Hardwick Hall is a country house dating from around 1590 and was built for Elizabeth Talbot, Countess of Shrewsbury (Born circa 1527 - Died 13 February 1608) (also known as Bess of Hardwick), who was thought to be the richest woman in Elizabethan England after Queen Elizabeth I (Born 7 September 1533 – Died 24 March 1603) herself. Read More »

Rivington Castle

Based upon a plan made by E. W. Cox in 1892, Rivington Castle is a folly and reconstruction of William II de Ferrers, 4th Earl of Derby’s, 13th century Liverpool Castle. Rivington Castle dates from 1912, when the building work began. It was built by William Hesketh Lever, 1st Viscount Leverhulme (Born 19 September 1851 – Died 7 May 1925) and can be found in Lever Park. Read More »

Grand Theatre, Lancaster

The Grade II listed Grand Theatre in Lancaster is one of the oldest in Britain, being opened by Charles Edward Whitlock and Joseph in 1782. Though the theatre was rebuilt in 1908, it is thought to have a ghost that lingers from the early 18th century. Read More »

Robin Hood's Bed

Robin Hood's Bed (or Chair or Robin Hood’s Quoit) can be found on Blackstone Edge, a gritstone escarpment between Greater Manchester and West Yorkshire.  It is a large millstone grit boulder in which according to local tradition Robin Hood slept in one night whilst guarded by his men. Read More »

Buckley Hall

Buckley Hall Prison now stands on the site of the original mansion house named Buckley Hall from which it no doubt gets its name. Buckley Hall which dated from at least the early 17th century was eventually modified and opened as an orphanage in 1887 after the previous owner died. The building was demolished in 1947 and the prison that replaced it was opened in 1966. Read More »

Rivington Pike

Rivington Pike is a local landmark and site of an early warning beacon, possibly one of a system dating back to 1139. It was still in use in 1588 when it was lit to warn of the Spanish Armarda. According to tradition, the Rivington Pike area is associated with a demonic spectral horseman. Read More »

Bryn Hall (Brynne Hall)

The original Bryn Hall which has now collapsed stood on I believe land close to or belonging to Landgate Farm and nothing now remains above ground. Read More »

St Peters Church, Burnley

The original church on this site possibly dated from 1122, though the oldest part of the current St Peters is the 15th century West Tower. Read More »

Martin Mere, Burscough

In 2002 there were reports of a large underwater predator, probably a huge catfish living in the lake and eating the local swans. The following BBC report dates from 27 July 2002.

'A giant fish which has attacked swans at a bird sanctuary has been spotted by wildlife experts. Read More »

Riviera, Norden

Between 1935 and 1966 an open air lido or swimming pool could be found at the bottom of Tenterhill Lane at Tenterhill Mill. There are stories that the Riviera was haunted. The Paranormal Database refers to a male figure that was sometimes seen standing outside the pool. Read More »

Hull Masonic Hall, Dagger Lane

The following article entitled 'Hunt for Charlie the ghost at Hull Masonic Hall in Dagger Lane' was published in the Hull Daily Mail on 22 November 2014.  It concerned a paranormal investigation to raise money for charity. Read More »

The Rake Inn, Littleborough

The old Grade II listed coaching house which has been known as The Rake Inn, Hayrake and now The Rake Mediterranean Tapas Restaurant, dates from the very late 17th century and has been a public house since at least 1734, when Abraham Whitehead was the landlord. Read More »

John Ellis, Oldham Road, Rochdale

John Ellis (Born 4 October 1874 – Died 20 September 1932) served as one of the United Kingdoms executioners for 23 years before retiring in 1924. During his service he attended 203 hangings, the last of which was the execution of John Eastwood at Armly Goal in Leeds. Read More »

Wodna Zena

The following is taken from an article by W Gregor in Folklore [A Quarterly Review Of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892).  ‘In Roumania each spring is supposed to be presided over by a Spirit called Wodna zena or zona. When a Roumanian woman draws water she spills a few drops to do homage to this Spirit’.—The Land beyond the Forest, vol. ii, p. Read More »

Linn of Dee

According to an article by W Gregor in Folklore [A Quarterly Review Of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘At one time there lived near the Linn of Dee, in Mar Forest, a man named Farquharson-na-cat, i.e., Farquharson of the wand. He got this name from the fact that his trade was that of making baskets, sculls, etc. Read More »


The following extract is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). 'This is a small loch on the side of the old military* road between Gorgarff and Tomintoul. The road passes close by its brink on the west side. On the other side of the road is an almost perpendicular rock, between 400 and 500 feet high. Read More »

Tobar Vacher. (Tobar Mhachar)

The following description is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘This is a fine well, dedicated to St. Machar, near the present farm of Corriehoul, Corgarff, Strathdon. A Roman Catholic chapel was at one time near it, and the present graveyard occupies the site of the chapel. Read More »

Tobar-Fuar-Mòr (The Big Cold Well)

The following description of The Big Cold Well is taken from Folklore [A Quarterly Review of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892). ‘This well is situated at the bottom of a steep hill in a fork between two small streams on the estate of Allargue, Corgarff. There are three springs that supply the water, distant from each other about a yard. Read More »

Ben Newe Well

According to an article by W Gregor in Folklore [A Quarterly Review Of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892) ‘There is a big rugged rock on the top of Ben Newe in Strathdon, Aberdeenshire, On the north side of this rock, under a projection, there is a small circular-shaped hollow which always contains water. Read More »

White Foot Lane, Burgh

According to Folklore [A Quarterly Review Of Myth, Tradition, Institution & Custom] Vol III (1892), ‘Mr. Maude also tells me that a lane in Burgh is called White-foot Lane because a ghost with white feet walks up it’

The White Hart Inn, Blythburgh

Dating from the 16th century, the White Hart was originally the courthouse. In 1967 it is said there were claims of ghostly footsteps, the sound of loud banging on a particular door and lights that would switch off on their own. These reports were attributed to a ghostly monk. There are no reports of the pub being haunted these days.

The Church of Holy Trinity, Blythburgh

Holy Trinity Church in Blythburgh is a Grade I listed building dating from the 14th century, which is thought to be built on the site of a much early church built in 630AD. It was said to have been visited by Black Shuck in 1577. Read More »

Toby’s Walk

Toby’s Walk is so named after Tobias Gill, a negro drummer from the 4th Dragoons who was executed for the murder of Anne Blakemore on 14 September 1750. Anne’s body was found in this vicinity and stories have developed that the walk is haunted by Black Toby.

Anne Blakemore & Tobias Gill (Black Toby)

On 24 June 1750, Anne Blakemore of Walberswick died. Her body was found on the Walks a mile west of Blythburgh and negro drummer named Tobias (Toby) Gill from the 4th Dragoons (Lieutenant General Sir Robert Rich's Regiment of Dragoons) was accused of her murder. The Dragoons had been based in that area to combat smuggling and Toby had been drunk near where Anne’s body was discovered. Read More »



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