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Trichug

Trichrug or Pen-y-bicws is a hill in the Brecon Beacons standing 415m in height. It is associated with both a stone throwing giant and local fairies. Read More »

Old Blacksmiths Shop, Gretna Green

The following article by Sue Crawford entitled 'Ghost hunt at Gretna's famous Blacksmiths Shop' was published in the News & Star on 8 August 2013.

Paranormal investigators are to hold a vigil after reports of “terrifying” incidents at Gretna Green’s famous Blacksmiths Shop Read More »

Church of St. Meilig, Llowes and Moll Walbee's Stone

The medieval church of St Meilig was rebuilt in 1853, though the bottom of the tower may be a remnant of the earlier building. Inside the church is a standing stone with a cross carved into it, which possibly dates from the 6th or 7th century. The stone which is thought to have stood at or near the site of a 6th century monastery founded by St Meilig at Croesfeilig. Read More »

Alluring Stone

The following description of the Alluring Stone appeared in 'British Goblins' (1881) by Wirt Sykes. 'In Carmarthen are still to be found traces of a belief in the Alluring Stone, whose virtue is that it will cure hydrophobia. It is represented as a soft white stone, about the size of a man s head, originally found on a farm called Dysgwylfa, about twelve miles from Carmarthen town. Read More »

The Abuela's Skeleton

A poor family once lived close to Lago de Patzcuaro, farming beans, corn and squash. There was a wife, her husband, her mother and her small son. The boy was especially fond of his grandmother (abuela) and he was the apple of her eye. They would often pick wildflowers together or go down to the lake shore and watch the boats on the water. Read More »

Uckfield Black Cat (2013)

The Sussex Express published the following article entitled 'Big Cat sighted at Uckfield' on 31 May 2013. 'A group of members of staff from Uckfield Community Hospital, were working a night shift when they glanced towards the window as something had caught their eye. Read More »

Canrig Bwt

A famous Welsh witch, who used to sleep under stone at Llanberis, in North Wales, was called Canrig Bwt, and her favourite dish at dinner- was children's brains. A certain criminal who had received a death-sentence was given the alternative of attacking this frightful creature, his life to be spared should he succeed in destroying her. Read More »

St. Tydecho Stone

In the village of Llanymawddwy, there is an ancient church dedicated to St. Tydecho, thought to be the son of Anna Pendragon, King Arthur’s sister. Wirt Sykes in British Goblins (1881) gives the following tale of St. Tydecho and a blue stone. ‘There was a stone in the valley of Mowddwy, which did good service for the church. A certain St. Read More »

Church of St David, Llanfaes

The Grade II listed Church of St David in Llanfaes dates from 1923-25. This church replaced an earlier one built in 1859. It has been suggested that this Victorian St David’s that was constructed by J Clayton, was built beside the remains of an earlier medieval church. The church at Llanfaes has been recorded as early as 1291 in the 'Ecclesia de Lanmays'. Read More »

Here Be Dragons And Ghosts...The Coiled Serpent And Otherworld Hoodies

Drakelow

Drakelow in Worcestershire derives its name from a mythological creature - the dragon. The word for dragon in Germanic mythology and its descendants is worm (Old English: wyrm, Old High German: wurm, Old Norse: ormr), meaning snake or serpent. In Old English wyrm means "serpent", draca means "dragon" (Skeat). Read More »

Llech Lafar, St Davids

Llech Lafar, a speaking slab of marble by the River Alun is referred to by Wirt Sykes in his ‘British Goblins’ (1881). 'The Talking Stone Llechlafar, or stone of loquacity, served as a bridge over the river Alyn, bounding the churchyard of St. David s in Pembrokeshire, on the northern side. Read More »

Haunted Lambeth by James Clark

Haunted Lambeth by James Clark

Written by fellow ASSAP (Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena) member, James Clark, Haunted Lambeth features a collection of paranormal tales including poltergeists, apparitions, black dogs and other unexplained phenomena. Read More »

St. Illtyd's Well, Llanrhidian

St. Illtyd's Well or the Butter Well as it is also known, can be found in a private garden near the Church of St Rhydian and St Illtyd in Llanrhidian.  It acquired the name Butter Well after an event in the 12th century when milk apparently flowed from it for three hours. Read More »

Sandford's Well, Newton Nottage

The following description by Wirt Sikes of Newton Nottage's well was published in his 'British Goblins' (1881).  'At Newton Nottage, Glamorganshire, a holy well called Sanford s is so situated that the water is regulated in the well by the ocean tides. Read More »

Milecastle 42, Hadrian’s Wall

The construction of Hadrian's Wall began in AD122. It measured 73 miles and ran from Segedunum at Wallsend, across the width of the country to Bowness on Solway in Cumbria. Each mile there was a gateway through the wall which could be found at a milecastle, which was effectively a small fortlet and equally spaced between each milescastle were two turrets. Read More »

Roads To The Otherworld: Contemporary Haunted Roads And A Sacred Landscape

Oldnall Road, a seemingly unremarkable two-mile rural stretch of B-road between the towns of Halesowen and Stourbridge in the West Midlands, hit the international headlines a few months ago (1) following reports of a series of sightings of an apparition. Reports of 'road ghosts' are nothing unusual, they form an important part of 'ghost lore' throughout the world (2). Read More »

Spring Heeled Jack – The Terror of the Black Country

Out of the dark, supernatural depths of Victorian England one name stands out. Jack.

Not Jack the Ripper, but a more supernatural fiend - Spring Heeled Jack! Read More »

Medieval Heretics and the Green Man

There is a general acceptance that the Green Man is a representation of a pagan deity, but this is not borne out by the abundance of Green Man carvings to be found on or within Christian churches. Could this contradiction be the clue that will lead to our understanding of this archaic figure? Why do we find the Green Many associated with churches? Read More »

The Undreamed Region: Barrows In Folklore & Archaeology

Hills, mounds and burial sites. Places which have a timeless allure. Such places can be seen and regarded as mythically liminal, a place that it is not a place. A place outside of time. A place where the living freely walk with the dead. Barrows are just such places. Read More »

The Lake Vyrnwy Obelisk

The Lake Vyrnwy Obelisk

Lake Vyrnwy Dam and the associated waterworks was constructed in the 1880s to provide drinking water for Liverpool and Merseyside. Today the area is a nature reserve and conservation area popular with the many visitors who come to enjoy the magnificent scenery. Read More »

Fairies Of St Fillans (2005)

In November 2005 a housing developer was prevented from moving a rock as the local population of St Fillans claimed it would kill the fairies living under it. The following article entitled ' Fairies stop developers’ bulldozers in their tracks' was published in The Times on 21 November 2005. Read More »

Observatory Tower, Lincoln Castle

On 13 April 2004 the following story was published in the Lincolnshire Echo detailing a family's strange experience at Lincoln Castle's Observatory Tower.

A Family got the fright of their lives when they stumbled on what they believe was a malevolent ghost in Lincoln Castle. Read More »

Secret Places of West Dorset by Louise Hodgson

Secret Places of West Dorset by Louise Hodgson

Offering a deeper look at the landscape and our hidden past, this book describes over 40 inspiring and less-frequented places in West Dorset. Read More »

Spirit of Portland: Revelations of a Sacred Isle by Gary Biltcliffe

Spirit of Portland

Intrigued by The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons? Gary Biltcliffe has been studying the Isle of Portland in Dorset for many years and reveals some ground-breaking discoveries in this book, including a secret Masonic code found in Portland’s churches left as clues by 19th-century Freemasons. Read More »

Roaring Dorset! Encounters with Big Cats by Merrily Harpur

Roaring Dorset

Nevermind the Serengeti, Dorset is, arguably, where you are most likely to bump into a big cat, according to Merrily Harpur, author of two books on the subject – Mystery Big Cats and Roaring Dorset! Encounters with Big Cats. Read More »



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