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Tylwyth Teg

Tylwyth Teg is a general name for the fairies in Wales, it means the 'fair folk'. Like the Bendith y Mamau the flattering name was thought to appease them. Read More »

The Linton Worm

During the twelfth century a worm lived in a hollow on the Northeast side of Linton Hill (called Worms Den today). Read More »

Lludd (Llud) and Llefelys (Llevelys)

The earliest origins of this story are obscure, but it first appears in the twelfth century, when Geoffrey of Monmouth included it in his History of the Kings of Britain. Monmouth's version was the basis for what is perhaps the best-known version, which appears in 'The Mabinogion', the collection of old Welsh stories compiled by Lady Charlotte Guest in the late 19th century.
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The Dream of Maxen Wledig

The Dream of Maxen Wledig is one of the Medieval Welsh tales translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, which were published collectively as the Mabinogion in 1849. The story is rooted in a mythic interpretation of the twilight of Roman era in Britain. Read More »

Will o' the Wisp

Will o' the Wisp

The Will o' the Wisp is the most common name given to the mysterious lights that were said to lead travellers from the well-trodden paths into treacherous marshes. The tradition exists with slight variation throughout Britain, the lights often bearing a regional name. Read More »

Elidor and The Golden Ball

This story was first collected by the medieval chronicler Geraldus Cambrensis, and tells of how a young boy lived for a time in the fairy kingdon, until the day he tried to steal one of their belongings. This version is from Joseph Jacob's More Celtic Fairy Tales, 1892. Read More »

Fachan

fachan

The Fachan (Fechan or Fachin or Peg Leg Jack) is a found in Scots-Irish Folklore. A Fachan's appearance is so terrible it was known to cause heart attacks. It has one eye, one leg, one withered arm coming out of it's chest and a mane of black feathers. Read More »

Carleton Castle

This ruined castle is said to be the haunt of Sir John Cathcart, identified as a Scottish Bluebeard. Read More »

Culzean Castle

Culzean Castle

Culzean Castle stands on the site of a 15th century Kennedy stronghold. The castle was completely redesigned by Robert Adam between 1777 and 1792, under the 10th Earl of Cassillis. Read More »

Alloway

The Old Kirk Church

Alloway, the birthplace of Robert Burns, provided inspiration for one of his most famous poems Tam o' Shanter. Read More »

Dean Castle

Dean Castle

Dean Castle is a restored towerhouse and palace standing in a wooded valley - from which it derives its name - not far from the urban centre of Kilmarnock. Read More »

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle sits in a prominent position on castle hill above the town and is now in a ruined and dangerous condition. The castle was important during the Scottish - English wars, and was scene to an infamous event known as Wallace's Larder. An English garrison was stationed at the Castle, and Wallace arranged a decoy fire in the village. Read More »

Cessnock Castle

The castle dates from the 15th century, and was a stronghold of the Campbell's. The castle was converted to a mansion house much later in its history. Read More »

Sundrum Castle

The castle is said to be the haunt of a Green Lady, a common legend in castles throughout Scotland. Read More »

Dunure Castle and the Roasted Abbot

Dunure Castle

Once a Kennedy stronghold, this castle is now a crumbling ruin eroding steadily into the sea with every passing Ayrshire winter. In 1570 it was the scene for the legendary roasting of the abbot of Crossraguel. Read More »

Hermitage Castle

Hermitage Castle 2

Hermitage Castle has a long and colourful history, the castle was a bastion of power in the 'debatable land': land that was exchanged between English and Scottish hands during the border wars and skirmishes. The castle is steeped in folklore and legend, and there have been reports of varied strange phenomena in recent years. Read More »

Nuckelavee (Scottish)

One of the most fearsome and gruesomely described supernatural creatures, the Nuckelavee inhabited parts of Northern Scotland.

The creature's home was in the sea but it ventured on land often to feast upon humans. The Nuckelavee rode a horse on land, and its horse was sometimes indistinguishable with its own body. Read More »

Aughisky

Water Horses

These are the water horses of Ireland and are similar to the Each Uisge and Cabyll-Ushtey. They gallop out of the crashing waves up onto the shore, venturing inland. They are supposed to make excellent mounts for whoever can catch one but riding a Aughisky is not without risk. Read More »

Each Uisge

Water Horses

The Each Uisge, is a name for the Highland supernatural water horse, supposedly the most dangerous of the Scottish water dwelling creatures. The monster inhabited the sea, sea lochs and fresh water lochs and is sometimes mistaken in writing as the Kelpie, which is supposed to inhabit rivers and streams. Read More »

Prestwick Area

The area around Prestwick has been the focus of a number of UFO sightings.  Triangular shaped craft were seen by numerous witnesses during 1997, and several sightings were reported to the Air Traffic Read More »

Ballochmyle Cup and Ring Markings

This cliff face site was rediscovered in the 1980's, and consists of an abundance of cup and ring markings and other more obscure symbols. Read More »

Bessie Dunlop, The Witch of Dalry

Bessie Dunlop was known as the witch of Dalry (Ayrshire), she was burned at the stake in 1576 although she was seen as a white witch. Her story is interesting because it outlines some of the folk beliefs at the time. Read More »

Loudon Castle

Now home to the Loudoun Castle Family Theme Park, there was a castle here from at least the 15th century, which was then converted into a mansion retaining the tower house. Read More »

Stevenston’s Legend of the Hidden Gold

After the routing of the Spanish Armada in 1588, many of the Spanish Galleons escaped and tried to find North West passage through the North Sea: around the tip of Scotland and back to Spain. Read More »

The Granny Stane

The squat black rock, which sits in the river Irvine below the modern Rivergate shopping centre, is once thought to have belonged to a stone circle. Read More »



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