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St George's Day

St George

Today St George’s Day is not celebrated in England with anywhere near the vigour it was in past centuries, and is actually celebrated more in other countries that share his patronage, with traditions that have not been broken for hundreds of years. Read More »

St Simon's Well

According to Edmund Bogg in “From Eden Vale to the plains of York or A Thousand Miles in the Valleys of the Nidd and Yore" (1894) ”In the township of East Scrafton is a spring of water known as St. Simon's Well. Near it once stood an oratory called St. Simon's Chapel; not a vestige of this remains. The well was formerly used as a bath. Tradition says that St. Read More »

Shooters Hill Big Cat (1963)

On 18 July 1963 a large cat was seen by a lorry driver traveling up the western side of Shooters Hill. He saw what he thought was an injured animal, possibly a dog and stopped to give it assistance. The animal got up and fled into the woods. It had a curled tail and was golden in colour. It had some prey in its mouth and it appears that the driver disturbed ait whilst it was feeding. Read More »

Sydenham Black Panther

In March 2005 a large black cat attacked a Sydenham resident named Anthony Holder. The story of the incident appeared in the Daily Mail on 23 March 2005 in an article (featured below) by Sam Greenhill entitled ‘The night I was mauled by London's 'black panther’ Read More »

St Lewina

St Lewina was a young British virgin who was martyred by Saxons on 24 July 687AD (whilst Theodore was 7th Archbishop of Canterbury). Following her death she was buried at Seaford, near Lewes in East Sussex. Read More »

Crossroad Blues

Gallows

“I went down to the Crossroads, fell down on my knees” Robert Johnson.
When Robert Johnson sang of the Crossroads down in the 1930’s Mississippi Delta, he was paying homage to a tradition that has existed in varied forms for centuries, and at the same time adding his own contribution to the wealth of folklore that exists around the crossing place of two highways. Read More »

Lake Memphremagog

Lake Memphremagog (meaning "where there is a big expanse of water" in native Algonkian) is a thin twenty seven mile long freshwater glacial lake which some believe is the home to a huge serpent like creature known as Memphré. Lake Memphremagog spans across the border between Canada and the United States of America. Read More »

The Bull, Shooters Hill

The Bull at 151 Shooter Hill dates from 1749 (though it was rebuilt in 1881) and it was a popular stopping place for coaches traveling along the route between London and Dover (Shooters Hill Road follows the route of the Roman Watling Street). Read More »

Mysterious Britain & Ireland Domesday Census

Domes Day Book

In 1086 William the Conqueror commissioned a survey to to find out what or how much each landholder had in land and livestock, and what it was worth. The record of this survey became known as the Domesday Book and was invaluable when it came to setting taxation. Read More »

Dagg Poltergeist

The case of the Dagg Poltergeist took place in the Ottawa Valley during the end of 1889 and centered around the farm and family of George Dagg. Read More »

Beast of Bexley (2005)

On 25th May 2005 News Shopper published the following article by Linda Piper entitled ‘Return of the Beast’ It focuses on a potential shared sighting of the Beast of Bexley in Bexleyheath. Please note that the map does not show the exact location of the experience. Read More »

Beast of Bexley Sighting (2008)

On 11 August 2008 News Shopper published the following article entitled Beast of Bexley Sighting by Robert Fisk.

A Beast of Bexley-type creature is believed to have been spotted in Thamesmead. Read More »

Beast of Bexley

On 19 March 2007 The Richmond & Twickenham Times published the following article concerning The Beast of Bexley. Read More »

Gormire Lake & White Mare Crag

Surrounded by the dense Garbutt Wood, Gormire Lake is the result of glacial activity and is one of the few natural lakes in Yorkshire. Gormire Lake has a few little known gems of folklore attached it. One tale involves a witch who was being chased across the moor. Read More »

Kilburn White Horse

The Kilburn White Horse was finished on 4th November 1857 and is believed to be the most northern and possibly the largest White Horse in Britain, being 318’ long and 220’ high (though it was designed to be 314’ long and 228’ high). It faces south-south-west and is situated near Roulston Scar, to the south of Sutton Bank. Read More »

Twelve Apostles Standing Stones

Twelve Apostles

Situated 1264 feet above sea level, the Twelve Apostles Standing Stones (once known as the Druids Chair and the Druidical Dial Circle) is the second highest ancient monument on Rombald’s Moor and probably dates from 3500-4000 years. Read More »

Sockburn

Sockburn village now comprises of a ruined church, a farmhouse and a mansion called Sockburn Hall (built in 1834) all positioned within a loop in the River Tees known locally as Sockburn Peninsula. Sockburn has an amazing secret history though, as it is a place where bishops were crowned, a dragon was killed and some of our greatest writers fell in love. Read More »

Robert Burns and Folklore

Robert Burns

Robert Burns was born on the 25th January 1759 during the ‘Age of Enlightenment’ but also in a time when the country superstitions and supernatural beings were an integral part of folk belief. The landscape of Burns’ was one where the natural rhythms of nature were much more intertwined in the day to day of working life. Read More »

The Highgate Vampire - How It All Began - by David Farrant

Highgate Cemetery

LONDON 1969, AND WIDE REPORTS WERE COMING INTO the British Psychic and Occult Society concerning a tall black apparition that had been seen lurking among the tombs of London's Highgate Cemetery. Most of these reports were from people who claimed to have been confronted by this apparition which invariably took the form of a tall dark figure and petrified people both in, or passing, the cemetery. Read More »

Bingen Poltergeist

Situated at the junction of the Rhine and Nahe rivers, Bingen is a city that is connected to a very old poltergeist story. The report appears in the Annales Fuldenses which were written in the Abbey of Fulda, Franconia during the ninth century, covering the rule of the Carolingian line from Louis the Pious (778–840) to Louis III, ending in 1901. Read More »

Eildon Hill

Eildon Hill

Eildon Hill is a triple peak that dominates the landscape around Melrose in Southern Scotland. The hillfort was occupied in pre-historic times, was used as a signal station by the Romans, and was re-occupied during the Romano-British period. It is associated with the legendary wizard Michael Scot, and the ballad of Thomas the Rhymer. Read More »

Admiral Tryon's Ghost

Admiral Tryon

Following an eight year search, on 22nd August 2004, Christian Francis of Lebanon Divers found the wreck of HMS Victoria near Tripoli. Standing vertically with her bow and the first 30m of her length buried in the seabed, she was the victim of naval blunder and her sinking in 1893 is directly linked to reports of an apparition being witnessed. Read More »

An Interview With Rev Lionel Fanthorpe

Rev Lionel Fanthorpe

A few years ago I was captivated by a talk given by Rev Lionel Fanthorpe at the first Muncaster Paranormal Conference and having been a fan of his since the days he presented Fortean TV in the mid 1990’s, I was disappointed that I missed the opportunity to speak to him. Therefore I was delighted when he agreed to give an exclusive interview for Mysterious Britain & Ireland. Read More »

Edin's Hall Broch

This is one of the most southerly broch survivals, which are more typically associated with Northern Scotland. Broch’s were multi floored defensive structures with room for cattle in the lower enclosure and accommodation on the upper floors accessed by passageways in the thick walls. Read More »

La Hogue Bie

La Hogue Bie

La Hogue Bie is a major Neolitic ritual site dating back to 3500BC and one of the best preserved cruciform passage graves in Europe. Its passage is twenty meters long and is covered by a 12.2 meter high earth mound. The mound istelf is 58 meters in diameter and covers an area of 2400 square meters. Read More »



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