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Burning of the Bartle, West Witton

Famous for the Burning of the Bartle festival, when an effigy of St Bartholomew is burned in the town. The festival takes place on the nearest Saturday to the 24th of August. Read More »

Newby Church near Ripon

Newby Church Monk

In 1963 the vicar of Newby Church, the Reverend K. F. Lord, took photographs of the church interior. When developed one had a strange hooded figure in it. In all probability this is a fake picture although now hard to verify without further research. Read More »

Marston Moor

On a minor road between the A59 and the B1224, a major battle of the civil war was fought on the 2nd July 1644. In 1968 some tourist were lost on the road when they came across a group of men dressed as 17th century soldiers. They thought that they were people in fancy dress, although the men looked worn out. They later discovered that they had been on the road through the battle site. Read More »

Acaster Malbis

During the medieval period in Britain the Jewish people were heavily persecuted, one of the heavy persecutions was carried out in York. A group of Jewish people fled to Acaster Mathis, and used the parish church for meeting. Some local villagers managed to trap the group inside and then set fire to the building - killing all those who were trapped inside. Read More »

Troller's Gill, Appletreewick

The caves of this deep limestone ravine are the haunt of trolls and sprites. The Gill is also associated with a black dog legend. Read More »

The Treasurer's House

The Treasurer's House was the seat of the treasurers of York Minister from the 12th century to 1546. The last treasurer - William Cliffe - resigned, after all the treasure was removed during the dissolution of the monasteries. The house was extensively rebuilt in the 17th century. Read More »

The Theatre Royal, York

The Theatre Royal is reputed to be haunted by a ghostly nun who has been witnessed several times. The Theatre was built on the site of Old St Leonard's Hospital founded in the 12th century. The theatre also has a tradition about a Grey Lady, and the ghost of an actor who died in a duel.

Viking Hotel, York

In the past staff of this hotel claimed to have seen a shadowy shape on the stairs. The site of the hotel used to have a house upon it, which was reputedly haunted and connected to a murder.

Bainbridge

Associated with a 700 year old tradition of horn blowing. The horn was sounded every night during the autumn and winter months. It was once a guide to travellers, who may have become lost in the great forests that surrounded the area.

Directions: Off the A684 to the East of Hawes. Or just listen for the horn.

Bagdale Hall

Bagdale Hall

The hall is the oldest building in Whitby built in 1516. It is now a hotel said to be haunted by Browne Bushell, a former owner who was executed for piracy. He has been seen walking up the staircase, and has also been heard in the same place.

There has been other strange phenomena associated with the hall over the years, including poltergeist activity.

Brimham Rocks

The rocks are associated with a wealth of folklore, and were perhaps a place of ancient worship. They were once thought to have been carved by the druids, although their strange weathering is entirely natural. One stone is called the wishing stone, it has a hole into which you would place the fingers of your right hand and then make a wish. Read More »

The Devil's Arrows

The Devil's Arrows are three Neolithic Megaliths - the tallest of which is 23 feet high - standing in a crooked alignment of around 580 feet. The fourth stone was destroyed in the 16th century, when Camden noted that it had been pulled down by treasure seekers.

In legend they were thrown by the Devil from Howe Hill to destroy Aldborough, hence their common name. Read More »

The Bridestones

The Bridestones are a set of natural weathered stones that are thought to have been used for ancient worship. A weathered horned head is carved into one of the stones, the date of the carving unknown.

Directions: To the East of the A169 Northeast of Lockton.

Middleham Moor

Haunted by the ghost of a lady in a black dress. Peat cutters are reputed to have discovered a body dressed in the rotting remains of a black shawl. She was meant to have been murdered by one of her admirers after he discovered she was to run away with another man.

Byland Abbey

William of Newburgh's Chronicle of 1290AD is said to mention the sighting of a round silvery object flying over the Byland Abbey in Yorkshire. Read More »

Upsall

Upsall is associated with a common tale: A man from the village dreamed for three consecutive nights that he should go to London and stand on London Bridge. Conceding to impulse he went to London and while on the bridge he was approached by a Quaker, to whom he told his dream. Read More »

A64 between York and Norton

Traditionally haunted by the spirit of Nance, who is said to guide travellers when there are dense mists. The story goes that she was due to marry a mail-coach driver but fell for the charms of a highwayman. He turned out to be a bad choice, as he left her and their baby to die of exposure on the lonely road. Read More »

Fountains Abbey

The abbey was founded in 1132 by the Benedictines, but was destroyed 30 years later, and then reconstructed. The abbey became one of the wealthiest in Britain due to the booming medieval wool trade. Its wealth was also to be its downfall, and it was one of the first abbeys to be crushed under the dissolution of the monasteries in 1540. Read More »

Gretna

Gretna Green Sign

The name Gretna derives origins from ‘Gretenhow', an Angle term meaning gravel hill. Of course the Angles were not the first settlers in Gretna, they had been preceded by both the Romans and Norsemen.  The area surrounding Gretna has seen many battles between the English and Scots as they invaded each other. In 1376 Gretna was completely destroyed during one such battle. Read More »

The Legend of Sawney Bean

Sawney Bean at cave

The story of Sawney Bean is one of the most gruesome Scottish legends, the plot of which would not look out of place in any modern horror/slasher movie. Evidence suggests the tale dates to the early 18th century. Read More »

The Newgate Calendar Part 1: Sawney Bean

Sawney Bean

An extract from The Newgate Calendar Part 1 concerning Sawney Bean. Read More »

The County Hotel

County Hotel 1960

The hotel is said to have been haunted by the ghost of Bonnie Prince Charlie, who stayed here in 1745. Charlie is said to haunt many places in Scotland. Read More »

Site of The King's Arms Hotel

The Kings Arm Hotel 1945

The King's Arms Hotel, which was demolished in 1973, was reputed to be haunted by a woman in her early twenties. Traditionally she was the widow of Captain Robert Stewart, who died during the French revolution. She pined away after his death and died of heartbreak at the age of 24. Read More »

A75, Kinmount Straight

Hauntings on the A75 Kinmount Straight in South West Scotland have led to it being called 'the Ghost Road.' Here is a brief list of some of the more famous sightings along this route.

1957
A lorry driver ran into a couple crossing the road arm-in-arm in front of his lorry, but when he stopped the accident victims had vanished: sometime in 1957. Read More »

Drumlanrig Castle

Only the cellars remain of the original 14th century castle in which Mary Queen of Scots stayed in 1563. The mansion, which now stands on the site, was built in the 1700s for William Douglas, the first Duke of Queensberry. Bonnie Prince Charlie stayed at the castle in 1745, after his unsuccessful invasion of England. Read More »



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