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Virginia Water

In AD60 or 61AD the final battle between the Romans and the rebel Briton's led by Boudica (or Boudicca or Boadicea) was fought and is known as the Battle of Watling Street (or Battle of Paulerspury). No one actually knows where this battle described as being ‘being approached by a narrow defile with a wood at the back and a plain in the front ‘ by Tacitcus took place. Read More »

Cortachy Castle

Cortachy Castle is large baronial manor built around a 15th century stronghold and is the hereditary seat of the Earls of Airlie. The lands were granted to Sir Walter Ogilvy by King James II in 1473 which is probably when the construction of this castle began, though there had been a an earlier castle of the Stewart Earls of Strathearn dating from 1330 on the site previously. Read More »

Bayham Old Abbey

Established in 1207, Bayham, a Premonstratensian abbey was created from two floundering monastic sites at Otham and Brockley. It was built from local sandstone and being right on the border between Kent and Sussex, Bayham had a gate in each county. Read More »

Glen Derry, Cairngorms

A strange tall figure in black was seen in the glen in 1914, it was identified as the Devil or a similar phantom. Glen Derry is very close to Ben Macdui and a more extensive article covers a similar figure that haunts there.

St Andrews Church, Cobham

St Andrews in Cobham dates back to the 12th century, though it has been through extensive renovation during its 800 year history. The church is supposed to be haunted by a strange apparition, that of a blue donkey.

Hughenden Manor

Hughenden Manor is a Georgian Mansion now owned and opened to the public by the National Trust. It was the home of Benjamin Disraeli (21 December 1804 - 19 April 1881), Leader of the Conservative Party, Prime Minister between 1874 and 1880 and 1st Earl Beaconsfield from 1876. He is buried in a vault beneath St Michael's Church at Hughenden Manor and is said to haunt the house. Read More »

Hampton Court Palace

Catharine Howard

Hampton Court Palace and St James's Palace are the last two surviving palaces built by King Henry VIII. King Henry had acquired Hampton Court in 1525 when his Chief Minister, Thomas Wolsey, Arch Bishop of Canterbury fell from favour. Wolsey had spent seven years rebuilding the 14th century manor that would form the core of Henry's new palace. Read More »

Bramber Castle

The ruin of Bramber Castle is reportedly haunted by ghostly children that have been witnessed there. They are supposed to be the children of William De Braose, 7th Baron Abergavenny, 4th Lord of Bramber, who displeased King John I and as a result had his children captured and starved to death Read More »

Braddock Down

On 19th January 1643 Sir Ralph Hopton's Royalist forces camped at Boconnoc were surprised to discover a Parliamentarian army under the command of Lord Ruthin deployed on Braddock Down. Ruthin ordered an attack rather than waiting for the reinforcements under the Earl of Stamford to arrive from Liskeard. Hopton's forces won the battle securing Cornwall for the Royalists. Read More »

Black Heddon

This area was haunted by a bright glowing ghost female ghost. This type of ghost has acquired a name due what it wears and is known as a Silky. She would appear in silken attire and according to An Encyclopaedia of Occultism by Lewis Spence, would be "rattling in her silks". The spirit would terrify travelers foolish enough to venture into the night.  Read More »

The Red Lion, Avebury

The Red Lion

The Red Lion is reputed to be haunted the spectre of a young woman who, was said to have been thrown down the well of the pub, (now covered with glass) hundreds of years ago. Read More »

The Avebury Complex

Avebury Stone 2

The stone circle and henge that surrounds the village of Avebury, is only one in a series of monuments concentrated in this small area. The site is a remnant of a ritual Neolithic landscape, which still survives although degraded with time and the actions of over zealous groups in past centuries. Read More »

Kilmichael Country House Hotel, Brodick

Kilmichael is possibly the oldest house on the Isle of Arran and is associated with the Fullerton family who were one of the two major landowners on the island. The name itself indicates the location of the house may be on the site of an early Christian cell dedicated to St Michael. An apparition of a Grey Lady supposedly haunts the hotel.

Thainstone House Hotel, Inverurie

This 18th century mansion hotel set in 44 acres of meadows is said to be haunted by a Green Lady. She is the ghost of a former owner's daughter that died when thrown from her horse. Read More »

Maryculter House Hotel

Maryculter House Hotel is situated on the site of a Knights Templar Manor and the ghost that reputedly haunts here may be related to these crusading knights. The land at Maryculter was given to the Templars in 1187 by the King of Scotland, which at that time would have been William the Lion (1165-1214). A further gift of land in the area was then made by Walter Bisset of Aboyne. Read More »

Eilean Donan Castle

Eilean Donan Castle

Situated in Loch Druich, the castle as it stands now is the result of a 20 year restoration and reconstruction project undertaken by Lt.Col. John MacRae-Gilstrap when he purchased the ruin and the island it sits upon, in 1919. Read More »

Castle Rising

Castle Rising

The now ruined but still imposing Castle Rising with its extensive earthworks was built around 1140AD and is one of the most famous castles of its kind in the country. Back when it was built this area was a busy sea port, though it is now probably four miles from the waters of the North Sea. Read More »

Caisteal na Nighinn Ruaidhe

The 15th century (though possibly 13th century) Caisteal na Nighinn Ruaidhe or ‘Castle of the Red-Haired Maiden' was the reputed seat of the MacFiachar family, having been built by Mungan MacFiachar Read More »

North Berwick

In 1590, King James VI (19 June 1566 - 27 March 1625) of Scotland took a personal interest in the prosecution of a coven of witches from North Berwick who were accused of trying to assassinate him and his new bride Anne of Denmark with the use of Black Magic. Read More »

Marwell Hall

Now world renowned for the Marwell Zoological Park (which opened in 1972), Marwell Hall itself dates from around 1314. I was built by Walter Woodlock after gaining permission from Henry Woodlcok, Bishop of Winchester. By the early 16th century the estate was owned by Corpus Christi College which they rented out to various tenants. Read More »

Mull of Galloway

According to legend this was the last stronghold of the Picts. In their last battle with the King of Scotland they were all killed bar two, a father and son. Read More »

Fairy Boy of Borgue

In the village of Borgue there lived a young boy who the locals suspected had a relationship with the faeries. Read More »

The Owain Glyndwr Hotel, Corwen

Owain Glyndwr

Named after Owain Glyndwr the great Welsh hero who had strong connections with Corwen, this is probably one of the oldest hotel buildings in Wales dating back to 1329. The building was originally a monastery attached to the church behind and later a coaching inn. Read More »

Cross Keys Hotel, Peebles

This Coaching Inn dating from 1693 is located in the centre of Peebles and is probably the town's oldest building. Bedroom 5 is said to be haunted by the ghost of a woman called Marion Ritchie who was the first Landlady of the Cross Keys and this is where she reputedly died. Read More »

Baynards Park

The ghost of Sir Thomas More (born 7th February 1478) is said to have haunted this Tudor mansion. Read More »



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