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Arawn

A Welsh god who is the ruler of the underworld. He is mentioned in the Mabinogion in the Tale of 'Pwyll Lord of Dyfed' and in 'The Spoils of Annwn'.

Pwyll meets the god while he out hunting on the fringes of his kingdom, and offends Arawn by letting his hounds loose on a stag already being hunted by him. Read More »

Arianrhod

A Welsh goddess mentioned in the old Welsh stories now incorporated into the Mabinogion. She is the daughter of Don and the sister of Gwydion, the bard and magician. Read More »

Aengus Angus

An Irish god of love, he was one of the offspring of the promiscuous Dagda, and there are various tales told about his exploits in Irish mythology. Read More »

Afagddu (Avagddu)

The son of Ceridwen and Tegid Veol, in the Welsh myth of Taliesin. Ceridwen had two children; a daughter of outstanding beauty, and a son Afagddu, who was malformed and ugly (the least favoured of all men). To balance Afagddu's misfortune, Ceridwen decided to create a potion in her cauldron of inspiration, so that he might have knowledge of the future, clear sight, and be favoured among men. Read More »

Whitby

Whitby is associated with a wealth of traditions and legends. The abbey, now a guant ruin, was built in 651AD and destroyed in a Danish raid in 870AD, it was reconstructed by the Benedictines in the 11th Century. At one time crowds used to gather at the West side of Whitby churchyard, where there was clear view of the North side of the abbey and the highest window. Read More »

Callanais (Callanish) Stone Circle

Calanais 1

Situated near the village of Calanais, Isle of Lewis on a ridge of land above Loch Roag, Callanais is one of the more remote stone circles in the British Isles. The circle consists of a central stone just under five metres in height, surrounded by a circle of thirteen stones. Read More »

St Clements Church , Rodel

St Clements Church

This gloomy atmospheric church, dating from the sixteenth century, is dedicated to St Clement, who was a bishop of Dunblane parish. Read More »

Clach an Truiseil

Clach an Truiseil

This mighty monolith - dating back to the late Bronze Age - is Scotland's tallest standing stone, measuring nearly 6m (20 feet) in height, it would have been even taller before the change in climate a Read More »

Dun Carloway Broch (Dun Charlabhaigh)

Dun Carloway Broch

Situated on a rocky outcrop overlooking the sea, the broch is one of the best-preserved in Lewis; one wall still stands 30 feet at its highest point. Read More »

St Moluag's Church

St Moluag's Church Interior

This small and ancient church has a plethora of legends and traditions associated with it, making it one of the most important mysterious sites on the Isle of Lewis. Read More »

Eilean More, Flannen Islands

The mysterious disappearance of three lighthouse keepers on Eilean More in the Flannen Isles in 1900, is probably the best-documented mysterious disappearance to have occurred in Britain. Read More »

Steinacleit

This array of boulders marks what is left of a chambered cairn, and possibly shows the site was overlain by a huge hall. The site is 50 feet in diameter and oval in shape. The age of the site is debatable and according to different sources ranges from from 1800 - 1500 BC or 3000 - 1500 BC.

Directions: Steinacleit is at Siadar on the A857.

The Blue Men of the Minch

Folklore tells of a tribe of supernatural sea creatures called the Blue Men of the Minch, who used to inhabit the stretch of water known as the Minch, between Lewis, the Shiant Islands and Long Island. Read More »

Barpa Langass

Barpa Langass is a Neolithic chambered cairn, which now survives as a jumbled mass of stone overlooking a moonscape of barren peatland. The cairn is roughly 16 feet high, and around 82 feet across. Read More »

A857 between Galson and the Port of Ness

A875

According to a local tradition, the stretch of road (A857) from Galson to the Port of Ness at the tip of Lewis, is said to be haunted. The tale runs that a carrier from Ness was returning from Stornoway many years ago, and had to pass a large stone slab near the village of Galson, which marked the grave of a pedlar who had been murdered at the spot. Read More »

Mermaid's Grave

Pictish Mermaid

A mermaid is said to be buried in the sands in the area around Nunton. In 1830 some women who were gathering seaweed spotted a mermaid in the waters close to the shore.They tried in vain to catch her, but she was too clever for them. Read More »

Dun Borranish

This ruined dun is said to have been the home of a giant called Cuithach, who in the tradition of most giants, laid waste to the surrounding area by stealing cattle and killing local people. Read More »

Jupiter

Jupiter was the supreme god of the Romans, and the Lord of the Heavens and the Sky.

Being the lord of the skies he was responsible for all the weather, especially thunder and lightning, he was sometimes referred to as the Thunderer for this reason. Read More »

Mars

Mars is the Roman god of war and also of agriculture. He was very important to the Romans because he was the father of Romulus and Remus, the mythical founders of Rome.

In the beginning Mars was seen as more of an agricultural or pastoral god, this still had relevance, even after he became more and more associated with war. Read More »

Diana

A goddess of the moon and wild places, Diana is the primal powerful goddess and the 'Queen of Heaven' in the Roman Pantheon. Read More »

Epona

Epona

The horse was very important in Celtic society, and the main goddess associated with the horse was Epona, worshiped widely throughout Britain and the Continent during the Iron Age and Roman Period. Read More »

Loki, The Trickster

Loki, the trickster god, was the most malignant of the Nordic gods, but he could swing from the role of malicious trickster, to the one who baled the gods out of trouble. Read More »

Odin, The All Knowing

Odin

The Germanic god of wisdom, war and magic, he was worshiped throughout Britain, wherever the Vikings and other Nordic tribes settled. Many places are named after him, or from derivations of his name. Read More »

Frigg, Queen of Heaven

Frigg is the mother goddess of the Nordic pantheon, as the wife of Odin she is one of the most powerful goddesses, and 'Queen of the Heavens'.

She was the daughter of Nott and Nat and the mother of Baldur, the fairest of the gods. Read More »

Hel, Queen of Hell

One of the foul creations from the coupling of Loki and the giant Angrboda, Hel was the ruler of the netherworld (Niflheim or Helheim) where men who died out of battle went.

Her realm also had a place for criminals, oath-breakers and assassins, all taboo in Nordic society. Read More »



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