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Ackergill Tower

In the 15th century the castle was owned by the Keith family, who were in the midst of a feud with the Gunn family. After several murders and revenge murders, Helen Gunn of Braemore, was abducted by Dugald Keith who lived in the tower. Read More »

Ashintully Castle

The castle dates back to the 1500's, and was built as a fortified tower house by the Spalding family. Read More »

Huntingtower Castle

Huntingtower castle has been the focus of a history of royal intrigue, which led to the original name of the castle being changed form its earlier association with the Ruthven family. Read More »


At the battle of Killacrankie on 27th July 1689, 3,000 government troops (under General Hugh Mackay) were defeated by a rebel Highland army led by Viscount (Bonnie) Dundee. The battlesite is said to be haunted, the whole scene of carnage replaying on certain days in all its gory detail. Read More »

Newton Castle

Newton castle is said to be haunted by a Green Lady, a common apparition and folklore motif in many Scottish castles and fortified homes. Read More »

Meggernie Castle

The castle was involved in the intrigue of the 45 rebellion, and Jacobite troops are said to have stayed here, sheltered by James Menzie of Culdares. Read More »

St Fillan's Chair and Well Dunfillan

A rocky seat on top of the Dunfillan, is the place where St Fillan is said to have sat and blessed the surrounding lands. The chair was thought to be able to heal rheumatism of the back, although you had to be dragged back down the hill by your legs to affect a cure. This would certainly cause enough bruising to allow you to forget about your rheumatism for a while. Read More »


The dark brooding presence of Schiehallion (pronounced She-hal-e-on)- the fairy hill of the Caledonians - looms over the Eastern end of Rannoch moor like a voluminous guardian. The mountain is one of the traditional haunts of otherworld beings. Read More »

Cleaven Dyke

Cleaven Dyke was thought to be a Roman defensive structure until excavation revealed that it was in fact a Neolithic Cursus (a ceremonial earthwork), which must have been one of the largest - and most Read More »



The Morrigan is the fearsome Irish Goddess of Death, Conflict and Sexuality. Her name means 'Phantom Queen'. She is also known as Nehain (Frenzy) and Badhbh (Raven or Crow). Read More »

Llew Llaw Gyffes

Llew is seen by many scholars as the Welsh equivalent of Lugh, (which means light) the Irish god of light who is master of all the crafts of men. There are several parallels to his character and Llew, who is also known for his deftness of hand and skill in all things. Read More »

Dagda, Dahgdha, The Father God

The father god of Irish mythology, his name means 'The Good' he is master of all arts and knowledge, and can be seen as one of the most powerful gods in the Irish Celtic pantheon. Read More »



Although Cernunnos is a Gaulish horned god, his worship was widespread in the Celtic era, and he was venerated over the channel in Britain in various similar forms. Read More »

Cerridwen (Keridwen)

Cerridwen can be seen as a form of the dark goddess, associated with wisdom, magic loss and renewal. In Welsh mythology her dwelling place was said to be in the middle of lake Tegid, which is also called lake Bala in Gwynedd Wales. Read More »


Brigid's festival is the first of February, otherwise known as Imbolc, when ritual fires of purification were lit. She takes over from the goddess of winter and is seen as the maiden aspect of the triple goddess by some researchers. In Irish mythology she is the daughter of the Dagda, the father god, and ruler of the Tuatha de Dannan. Read More »

King Arthur

King Arthur

The legend of Arthur is one of the most popular and well known of British legends. From early brief passages to the mythic epic we know today, the story of Arthur has long been a source of inspiration to writers, poets and artists. He has become associated with hundreds of places in the British Isles and France, some of which will be listed in the gazetteer section in the coming months. Read More »

Gawain and The Green Knight

The story of Gawain and the Green Knight, follows a theme that is to be found in other Celtic myths, and is typical of the supernatural testing of warriors. The beheading challenge is a common folklore motif, and can be found in the tales of Cuchulian the hound of Ulster. Read More »

Geoffrey of Monmouth's Arthur

A brief run through of Geoffrey of Monmouth's version of the Arthurian legend from 'The History of the Kings of Britain'. Read More »

Bran The Blessed

A Welsh and Irish god of giant size who was the son of the sea god Mannannan Mac Lir.

Bran had many heroic episodes, but was fatally injured during an excursion to Ireland to rescue his sister Branwen. Mortally wounded in the foot with a poisoned spear, he ordered his companions to take his severed head to the White Mount, where the Tower of London now stands. Read More »


A flower maiden of Welsh myth, created for Llew Llaw Gyffes by Gwydion and Math from flowers and nine elements, because he was forbidden to take a human wife. Read More »


A goddess associated with farming and with cattle, two very important commodities in Celtic society. She was reared on the milk of a fairy cow, and pictured as a beautiful woman wearing a crown, and a breastplate, and carrying a spear. Read More »

Belenos (Belinus, Beli)

A Solar deity, he can be seen as a Celtic equivalent of Apollo, and there are various traces of his cult in Britain. In Irish mythology he was Bile, a powerful god of the underworld. Read More »

Balor of the Evil Eye

Balor can be equated to a god of death and destruction, in Irish mythology he was the son of Net, and lord of the Formorians, the grotesque race that inhabited Ireland before the Tuatha de Dannan. Read More »


A Welsh god who is the ruler of the underworld. He is mentioned in the Mabinogion in the Tale of 'Pwyll Lord of Dyfed' and in 'The Spoils of Annwn'.

Pwyll meets the god while he out hunting on the fringes of his kingdom, and offends Arawn by letting his hounds loose on a stag already being hunted by him. Read More »


A Welsh goddess mentioned in the old Welsh stories now incorporated into the Mabinogion. She is the daughter of Don and the sister of Gwydion, the bard and magician. Read More »



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