You are hereRecent Additions

Recent Additions



Polbeth UFO (1995)

In November 1995 Brian Curran took video footage of an orange stationary object with a dimpled surface. Later analysis showed that there were two small portions missing from the object that seemed to fill back in. The encounter ended when the object shot off at great speed.

The Fairy Boy of Leith

The story of the Fairy boy of Leith is relatively unknown today, and doesn't appear to have been recently recounted since its last appearance in the 1970s Reader's Digest compendium, Folklore, Myths a Read More »

Dechmont Woods Encounter

Bob Taylor's encounter with the mysterious spheres in Dechmont wood near Livingston in Scotland, is probably one of the most written about cases of a close encounter in Britain. The case stands as one of the most intriging in British Ufology. Read More »

Rosslyn Chapel & Roslin Castle

Rosslyn Chapel

Rosslyn Chapel is touted as being one of the most mysterious places in Scotland, especially with the current gloat of books purporting to show how hidden secrets lurk within every crack of stone at this venerated place. Anybody who has ever visited the chapel may feel that it deserves its current status, and I must confess the atmosphere even on a busy day is something to be experienced. Read More »

Bonnybridge UFOs

1989 Bonnybridge, near Shieldhill, Scotland: In a well-witnessed UFO sighting, a fire crew were attending a blaze at Gradrum Moss, when a red object appeared to be hovering in the distance. This came towards the fire engine and then flew off towards the West. A second object then appeared, it was white and hovered above Loch Ellrig at about twenty feet from the witnesses. Read More »

Falkirk UFO (1996)

In October 1996 Barry Macdonald filmed a UFO in Falkirk, which consisted of an orange oval changing to a white disc shape, before changing back to orange, then white, and then disappearing suddenly.

Sandwood Bay

Sandwood Bay is one of the most northerly sandy beaches in Scotland, and would be well worth a visit without the added interest of the strange phenomena that has happened here. Read More »

Ardvreck Castle

This ruined castle on the shore of Loch Assynt, was originally built by the MacLeods. Read More »

Dunrobin Castle

The castle is interesting because of its associated haunting, and it also houses a museum within its grounds containing many enigmatic picture stones. These stones, found all over Eastern Scotland are Pictish in origin, and nobody has successfully explained the strange symbols and pictures which decorate their surface.

History Read More »

Smoo Cave

Smoo Cave is a limestone cavern consisting of three chambers, a burn enters the second chamber through a hole in the roof falling for a distance of 80 feet. Read More »

Loch Ma Naire

This loch has long been seen as a healing loch, according to legend the loch received its powers from a magical healing stone belonging to a wise woman. Read More »

Screaming Skulls - An Introduction

Screaming Skull

The tradition of screaming skulls seems to be almost entirely isolated to England, where stories of these mischievous bone locked spirits abound. A screaming skull is basically a skull of dubious origin, said to cause great havoc - storms, poltergeist activity, and (given its namesake) unearthly screams - when it is removed from its pride of place within a stately home, or other ancient abode. Read More »

The Dragon in Folklore & Legend

Long Wyrm

The dragon is a legendary creature, which is prevalent to the mythic culture of many countries. Britain, with its diverse history, has a tradition of dragons stemming from Saxon, Celtic and Norse influences, as well as those from further afield. What follows is a brief overview of the dragon in legend and folklore, as well as some theories as to what the dragon may signify. Read More »

In Search of British Dragons

Dragon 1

The dragon is the great, great grandfather of all monsters. Before the daemon, before the vampire, before the werewolf, before the giant. Before them all was the original uber-monster the dragon. The dragon's image has crawled across cave paintings 25,000 years old, dwarfing mammoths. It has slithered across Chinese rock art in Shanxi province 8000 years before Christ. Read More »

Boabhan Sith

Baohban Sith

The Baobhan Sith is a particularly evil and dangerous female vampire from the highlands of Scotland. They were supposed to prey on unwary travellers in the glens and mountains. The name suggests a form of Banshee.

A common tale is told of 4 young friends who set off on a hunting trip in the glens, benighted the men take refuge in an abandoned Shieldig (small cottage). Read More »

Vampire Folklore

Dracula

Vampire folklore within the British Isles is surprisingly scarce, this is mainly due to the fact that the contemporary image of a vampire (a charismatic bloodsucker with a black cape, a mesmerising stare, and a penchant for nubile young women; plus an aversion to holy water, garlic and crosses.) is relatively recent, being the result of Hollywood portrayals of vampires, and the gothic Hammer House Read More »

Ruthin Castle

Castle Entrance

Before I begin I would like to say that I spent my honeymoon at Ruthin Castle, and found the accommodation and service exemplary. I would recommend staying in the castle to anybody, and I cannot overstate how much I enjoyed the Medieval Banquet which they host on a regular basis. Read More »

The Treasure of Craig-y-Ddinas

The Rock of the Fortress, was a hillfort during the Iron Age period, it is supposed to have been one of the last place the fairies lived in Britain. The following legend conforms to a folklore motif found throughout the country, namely that of sleeping warriors under hollow hills. Read More »

The Gwiber of Penmachno

Penmachmo

The word "gwiber" in Welsh means viper or adder but many centuries ago the word actually meant "flying snake" . This is the story of how Wibernant (meaning "valley of the gwiber) which is near Penmachno got its name. Read More »

Pwyll, Lord of Dyfed

The story of Pwyll is found in the Mabinogion, a collection of old Welsh stories translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, and published in 1849. It describes how Pwyll the Lord of Dyfed meets the underworld king Arawn and how the two become close allies. Read More »

The Great Giant of Henllys

The original tale first appeared in The Athenaeum, published in 1847, and tells how a tyrannous figure became even more fearsome as a ghost after he had died. Three brave priests finally exorcise the ghost with a mix of magic and prayer. Read More »

Laugharne

A spectral dog known as the Gwyllgi or the 'Dog of Darkness' is said to haunt the town. The dog appears with flaming red eyes, and is said to run from the castle to the town along an old route-way.

Directions: On the A4066

Ogaf Myrddin

Ogaf Myrddin means Merlin's Cave, and this is one of the locations where he is said to sleep awaiting his release. The cave is hidden behind a waterfall.

Directions: Northwest of Brechfa

Taliesin the Bard

Taliesin

This is the version translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, and published in 1849 in the collection of old Welsh tales entitled the Mabinogion. Traditionally Taliesin is placed in the time of Arthur, which is generally believed to be in the 6th century AD. Read More »

Bedd Arthur

The whole area around Dyfed is associated with Arthur, outlined in the old Welsh tales now part of the Mabinogion. This cairn on the hilltop is thought to be Arthur's Grave.

Directions: The grave is in the Prescely Mountains



Share/Save

Navigation

Recent comments

Featured Site