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Fairies Of St Fillans (2005)

In November 2005 a housing developer was prevented from moving a rock as the local population of St Fillans claimed it would kill the fairies living under it. The following article entitled ' Fairies stop developers’ bulldozers in their tracks' was published in The Times on 21 November 2005. Read More »

Observatory Tower, Lincoln Castle

On 13 April 2004 the following story was published in the Lincolnshire Echo detailing a family's strange experience at Lincoln Castle's Observatory Tower.

A Family got the fright of their lives when they stumbled on what they believe was a malevolent ghost in Lincoln Castle. Read More »

Secret Places of West Dorset by Louise Hodgson

Secret Places of West Dorset by Louise Hodgson

Offering a deeper look at the landscape and our hidden past, this book describes over 40 inspiring and less-frequented places in West Dorset. Read More »

Spirit of Portland: Revelations of a Sacred Isle by Gary Biltcliffe

Spirit of Portland

Intrigued by The Da Vinci Code and Angels and Demons? Gary Biltcliffe has been studying the Isle of Portland in Dorset for many years and reveals some ground-breaking discoveries in this book, including a secret Masonic code found in Portland’s churches left as clues by 19th-century Freemasons. Read More »

Roaring Dorset! Encounters with Big Cats by Merrily Harpur

Roaring Dorset

Nevermind the Serengeti, Dorset is, arguably, where you are most likely to bump into a big cat, according to Merrily Harpur, author of two books on the subject – Mystery Big Cats and Roaring Dorset! Encounters with Big Cats. Read More »

Paranormal Purbeck: A Study of the Unexplained by David Leadbetter

Paranormal Purbeck

Ghosts, moving objects, displacements in time, near death experiences, synchronicities, out-of-body experiences – these things are happening all the time. A new book just published by Roving Press entitled Paranormal Purbeck: A Study of the Unexplained features nearly 70 locations in Purbeck, Dorset, with first-hand, matter-of-fact accounts from more than 100 people. Read More »

St. Cynhafal's Well, Llangynhafal

According Wirt Sykes in ‘British Goblins’ (1881), ‘St. Cynhafal's well, on a hillside in Llangynhafal parish, Denbighshire, is one of those curing wells in which pins are thrown. Its specialty is warts. To exorcise your wart you stick a pin in it and then throw the pin into this well; the wart soon vanishes. Read More »

Freezing Hill, Bath

Landsdown Hill, Tog Hill and Freezing Hill were the site of the English Civil War Battle of Lansdowne (Lansdown), which was fought on 5 July 1643. The Parliamentarian force under Sir William Waller (Born C 1597 – Died 19 September 1668) was forced to retreat by the Royalist troops led by Lord Ralph Hopton, 1st Baron Hopton (Born March 1596 – Died September 1652). Read More »

Bell Of Saint Oudoceus

The 12 century Cathedral of Llandaff was built on the site of an earlier church traditionally attributed to Saint Telio, the successor of Saint Dubricius who had established a 6th century community here at a ford over the River Taff. Telio was succeeded by Saint Oudoceus (also known as Euddogwy) (Died 700AD). Read More »

Monsters In The Neigh-boar-hood: Cannock Chase

Search for “Cannock Chase” on the internet and you will come across a wealth of articles and websites referring to the area as one of England's top paranormal/UFO hotspots – a strangely alluring and ultimately warranted title. Read More »

Gliwice Vampire Graves (2013)

On 11 July 2013 The Telegraph published the following article by Matthew Day entitled Polish archaeologists unearth 'vampire grave' Read More »

Pfister Hotel, Milwaukee

The Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee was originally opened in 1893 by Guido and Charles Pfister, and according to the following Stacey Pressman article entitled 'The haunting of MLB's A-List',  a number of American baseball players seem to have had some strange experiences there. Read More »

8 Gay Street, Bath

The author and diarist Hester Lynch Piozzi (née Salusbury, surname of first marriage Thrale) (Born 1741 – Died 1821) who was a friend of Dr. Samuel Johnson (Born 18 September 1709 – Died 13 December 1784), lived at 8 Gay Street in Bath. I have come across a reference* to two haunt like experiences relating to the house, but I cannot comment on the validity of them. Read More »

The Giants From The West

According to James Mooney in his 'Myths Of The Cherokee’ (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) 'James Wafford*, of the western Cherokee, who was born in Georgia in 1806, says that his grandmother, who must have been born about the middle of the last century, told him that she had beard from the old people that long before her time a party of g Read More »

Nûñ'yunu'wï, The Stone Man

This is what the old men told me when I was a boy. Once when all the people of the settlement were out in the mountains on a great hunt one man who had gone on ahead climbed to the top of a high ridge and found a large river on the other side. Read More »

Hanged Slave, Suck Creek

There is a story that an escaping Slave ran from his master who lived in Suck Creek and fled along what is now known as the Cumberland Trail. He was chased, caught and severely beaten, before being hung on a tree. They must have misjudged the hanging though as the story relates he survived. Unfortunately his slave master returned to the tree and found that the slave had again escaped. Read More »

The Haunted Whirlpool

At the mouth of Suck creek, on the Tennessee, about 8 miles below Chattanooga, is a series of dangerous whirlpools, known as "The Suck," and noted among the Cherokee as the place where Ûñtsaiyï', the gambler, lived long ago. Read More »

Ûñtsaiyï', The Gambler

Thunder lives in the west, or a little to the south of west, near the place where the sun goes down behind the water. In the old times he sometimes made a journey to the east, and once after he had come back from one of these journeys a child was born in the east who, the people said, was his son. Read More »

The Nest Of The Tlä'nuwä

On the north bank of Little Tennessee river, in a bend below the mouth of Citico creek, in Blount county, Tennessee, is a high cliff hanging over the water, and about half way up the face of the rock is a cave with two openings. The rock projects outward above the cave, so that the mouth can not be seen from above, and it seems impossible to reach the cave either from above or below. Read More »

The Hunter In The Däkwä'

In the old days there was a great fish called the Däkwä', which lived in Tennessee river where Toco creek comes in at Däkwä', the "Däkwä' place," above the mouth of Tellico, and which was so large that it could easily swallow a man. Read More »

The Ustû'tlï

There was once a great serpent called the Ustû'tlï that made its haunt upon Cohutta mountain. It was called the Ustû'tlï or "foot" snake, because it did not glide like other snakes, but had feet at each end of its body, and moved by strides or jerks, like a great measuring worm. Read More »

How Masakuni Regained His Sight

The following story by Richard Gordon Sith was published in his 1918 book 'Ancient Tales and Folk-lore of Japan'. SOME seventy years ago there dwelt in Kyoto a celebrated swordmaker, a native of the province of Awa, in Tokushima. Read More »

Tsul'kälû, The Slant-Eyed Giant

The Tsul`kälû, (Judaculla or Tuli-cula or Juthcullah), a giant with sloped or slanted eyes appears in Cherokee legend as a figure associated withing hunting, a Master-of-Game. Read More »

The Great Leech Of Tlanusi'yï

The following legend is taken from ‘Myths Of The Cherokee’ by James Mooney (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.) ’The spot where Valley river joins Hiwassee, at Murphy, in North Carolina, is known among the Cherokees as Tlanusi'yï, "The Leech place," and this is the story they tell of it: Read More »

The Nûñnë'hï And Other Spirit Folk

According to ‘Myths Of The Cherokee’ by James Mooney (Nineteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology 1897-98, Part I.), The Knob, which is a name for the Big Pinnacle on Pilot Mountain (standing 2421 feet) was one of the homes of the Nûñnë'hï. Read More »



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