You are hereRecent Additions

Recent Additions

The Golden Dawn

Tree of Life

The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn was the most influential occult group to emerge from the end of the nineteenth century occult revival. The main achievement of the group, and of its more influential individuals, was to create a working system of magic, bonded from the various separate strands of tradition in existence at the time. Read More »

Lake Monsters

Apart from the famous Loch Ness Monster, there are many more reports of mysterious creatures within the lakes and lochs of Britain, dating as far back as recorded history, and probably further. Some are mingled with old folklore about dragons and mermaids, while the more modern sightings have often become attributed to unidentified real creatures, including extinct dinosaurs. Read More »

Culloden House

The house that exists stands on the foundations of a house where Bonnie Prince Charlie is said to have stayed with the Forbes family before the disastrous battle of Culloden in 1746. Read More »

Culloden Battlefield

Jacobite Army

The moor - site of the last battle on British soil -has its share of ghostly traditions, perhaps befitting for the scene of so much bloodshed and slaughter. The Battle of Culloden - April 16th 1746 - marked the fall of the Jacobite rebellion of 1745, which sought to restore the Stuart monarchy to the throne. Read More »

Canobie Dick

This story relates to a legend common throughout Britain, namely that of a secret cavern containing sleeping warriors. Often a test is conferred to the person who is shown into the cavern. Usually the tests are failed.

Once upon a time in the Borders region there lived a horse cowper (trader) named Canobie Dick, he was widely admired and feared for his fierce courage. Read More »

King Herla

In this tale Herla was the King of the Britons in ancient times. The tale seems to date from the medieval period but may have had earlier origins.

One afternoon after a hard days riding, Herla, the wise King of the Britons took leave from his men, and rested for a while among the ancients trees, part of the great forest that had stood in his kingdom for millennia. Read More »

Thomas the Rhymer

Thomas the Rhymer, was a famous Scottish prophet who is also known as Thomas of Ercildoune, Lord Learmont and True Thomas. There can be no doubt that he was actually a real person living in the thirteenth century, as documents exist signed by him as Thomas Rymour de Ercieldoune. Read More »

The Grey Cairns of Camster

The Camster Cairns are some of the best-preserved Neolithic burial mounds in Scotland. They date from around 3500BC, and are developed sites, in that they were used over a long period of time. Read More »

Stemster Hill Standing Stones

The standing stones below Stemster Hill, are unusual in that they consist of a U shape, rather than the traditional stone circle. Their real purpose is unknown but they may have had an astronomical usage.

Directions: On a minor road off the A9 and the A99

The Hill O' Many Stanes

This ancient site of worship is similar to Carnak in Brittany in its concept, but on a much smaller scale.

250 stones are set into 22 rows, which sweep in a fan formation down the hillside. The stones are set in a North South alignment, and are quite small in size, all standing under 3 feet in height. Read More »

Castle of Mey

The Castle of Mey, formerly known as Barrogill Castle dates from the 16th century and was built by the Earl of Caithness. The castle is haunted by the ubiquitous Green Lady, said to have been the daughter of the 5th Earl. Read More »

Ackergill Tower

In the 15th century the castle was owned by the Keith family, who were in the midst of a feud with the Gunn family. After several murders and revenge murders, Helen Gunn of Braemore, was abducted by Dugald Keith who lived in the tower. Read More »

Ashintully Castle

The castle dates back to the 1500's, and was built as a fortified tower house by the Spalding family. Read More »

Huntingtower Castle

Huntingtower castle has been the focus of a history of royal intrigue, which led to the original name of the castle being changed form its earlier association with the Ruthven family. Read More »


At the battle of Killacrankie on 27th July 1689, 3,000 government troops (under General Hugh Mackay) were defeated by a rebel Highland army led by Viscount (Bonnie) Dundee. The battlesite is said to be haunted, the whole scene of carnage replaying on certain days in all its gory detail. Read More »

Newton Castle

Newton castle is said to be haunted by a Green Lady, a common apparition and folklore motif in many Scottish castles and fortified homes. Read More »

Meggernie Castle

The castle was involved in the intrigue of the 45 rebellion, and Jacobite troops are said to have stayed here, sheltered by James Menzie of Culdares. Read More »

St Fillan's Chair and Well Dunfillan

A rocky seat on top of the Dunfillan, is the place where St Fillan is said to have sat and blessed the surrounding lands. The chair was thought to be able to heal rheumatism of the back, although you had to be dragged back down the hill by your legs to affect a cure. This would certainly cause enough bruising to allow you to forget about your rheumatism for a while. Read More »


The dark brooding presence of Schiehallion (pronounced She-hal-e-on)- the fairy hill of the Caledonians - looms over the Eastern end of Rannoch moor like a voluminous guardian. The mountain is one of the traditional haunts of otherworld beings. Read More »

Cleaven Dyke

Cleaven Dyke was thought to be a Roman defensive structure until excavation revealed that it was in fact a Neolithic Cursus (a ceremonial earthwork), which must have been one of the largest - and most Read More »



The Morrigan is the fearsome Irish Goddess of Death, Conflict and Sexuality. Her name means 'Phantom Queen'. She is also known as Nehain (Frenzy) and Badhbh (Raven or Crow). Read More »

Llew Llaw Gyffes

Llew is seen by many scholars as the Welsh equivalent of Lugh, (which means light) the Irish god of light who is master of all the crafts of men. There are several parallels to his character and Llew, who is also known for his deftness of hand and skill in all things. Read More »

Dagda, Dahgdha, The Father God

The father god of Irish mythology, his name means 'The Good' he is master of all arts and knowledge, and can be seen as one of the most powerful gods in the Irish Celtic pantheon. Read More »



Although Cernunnos is a Gaulish horned god, his worship was widespread in the Celtic era, and he was venerated over the channel in Britain in various similar forms. Read More »

Cerridwen (Keridwen)

Cerridwen can be seen as a form of the dark goddess, associated with wisdom, magic loss and renewal. In Welsh mythology her dwelling place was said to be in the middle of lake Tegid, which is also called lake Bala in Gwynedd Wales. Read More »



Recent comments

Featured Site