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Arbor Day, Aston on Clun

29th May - Is Arbor Day in Aston on Clun.  A Poplar tree in the town is bedecked with flags, they are left on the tree all year round.   The ceremony has been held each year at Aston on Clun since 1786 andprobablt dates back to 1660 when King Charles II declared a holiday in May called Arbor day following th erestoration of the monarchy.

Feast of St Michael

8th May - Feast of the Apparition of St Michael.  St Michael is one of the Archangels and is said to have appeared several times throughout history.  In 391AD at Monte Cargano and in 495AD at St Michaels Mount in Cornwall.  In 590AD he was seen by St Gregory the Great in the air sheathing his sword.  Signalling the ces Read More »

The Helston Flurry Dance

8th May - The Helston Flurry Dance takes place, where Helstonians take part in a pagan ritual processional dance through the town in a custom that pre-dates Christianity and probably dates back to Celtic times. The dance takes place each eighth of May unless it falls on a Sunday or Monday and was probably originally a fertility or Spring festival. Read More »

Frustrating the Fairies Day

4 May - Irish day for confusing the fairies so that they could not create any havoc.

Garland Dressing, Charlton On Otmoor

1st May - is Garland Dressing Day in Charlton On Otmoor.  A wooden cross is bedecked with Yew and Box leaves.

Padstow Hobby Horse (Oss)

1st May - The festival starts at midnight in the early hours of Mayday. The actual Hobby Horse is a hoop covered with black material with an African mask, and a horses head with snapping jaws. A man stands inside the hoop and the procession parades around the town. The festival has ancient origins. Read More »

May Day

1st May - The old Pagan fertility festival of Beltane, the day used to be celebrated in nearly every village green with may pole dancing. The custom has rapidly died out and many of the old village greens have been reclaimed. The festival was also celebrated with hilltop fires.

Beltane

Beltane Fire Festival - Calton Hill, Edinburgh

Beltane (or Beltaine) is a festival that marks the return of summer with the lighting of fires; where people could burn their winter bedding and floor coverings, ready to be replaced afresh. Referred to as a Gaelic ceremony, it has been celebrated for thousands of years throughout the United Kingdom and Europe. Read More »

Todmordon UFO Abduction (1980)

At around 5.00am on 28th November 1980 in Todmordon, PC Alan Godfrey, who was checking out a routine call on a local estate, was driving up Burnley Road, when he saw what he thought was a bus across the road further ahead of him. He drove towards it, and realised that it wasn't actually a bus at all but a hovering dome like object, 20 feet wide, topped with a row of windows. Read More »

Ilkley Moor UFO Abduction (1987)

On 1st December 1987 a former Police Officer, who has not been named, set off from his home early in the morning to visit a relative who lived in nearby East Morton. He decided to travel over Ilkley Moor and took with him a camera. Read More »

Tylwyth Teg

Tylwyth Teg is a general name for the fairies in Wales, it means the 'fair folk'. Like the Bendith y Mamau the flattering name was thought to appease them. Read More »

The Linton Worm

During the twelfth century a worm lived in a hollow on the Northeast side of Linton Hill (called Worms Den today). Read More »

Lludd (Llud) and Llefelys (Llevelys)

The earliest origins of this story are obscure, but it first appears in the twelfth century, when Geoffrey of Monmouth included it in his History of the Kings of Britain. Monmouth's version was the basis for what is perhaps the best-known version, which appears in 'The Mabinogion', the collection of old Welsh stories compiled by Lady Charlotte Guest in the late 19th century.
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The Dream of Maxen Wledig

The Dream of Maxen Wledig is one of the Medieval Welsh tales translated by Lady Charlotte Guest, which were published collectively as the Mabinogion in 1849. The story is rooted in a mythic interpretation of the twilight of Roman era in Britain. Read More »

Will o' the Wisp

Will o' the Wisp

The Will o' the Wisp is the most common name given to the mysterious lights that were said to lead travellers from the well-trodden paths into treacherous marshes. The tradition exists with slight variation throughout Britain, the lights often bearing a regional name. Read More »

Elidor and The Golden Ball

This story was first collected by the medieval chronicler Geraldus Cambrensis, and tells of how a young boy lived for a time in the fairy kingdon, until the day he tried to steal one of their belongings. This version is from Joseph Jacob's More Celtic Fairy Tales, 1892. Read More »

Fachan

fachan

The Fachan (Fechan or Fachin or Peg Leg Jack) is a found in Scots-Irish Folklore. A Fachan's appearance is so terrible it was known to cause heart attacks. It has one eye, one leg, one withered arm coming out of it's chest and a mane of black feathers. Read More »

Carleton Castle

This ruined castle is said to be the haunt of Sir John Cathcart, identified as a Scottish Bluebeard. Read More »

Culzean Castle

Culzean Castle

Culzean Castle stands on the site of a 15th century Kennedy stronghold. The castle was completely redesigned by Robert Adam between 1777 and 1792, under the 10th Earl of Cassillis. Read More »

Alloway

The Old Kirk Church

Alloway, the birthplace of Robert Burns, provided inspiration for one of his most famous poems Tam o' Shanter. Read More »

Dean Castle

Dean Castle

Dean Castle is a restored towerhouse and palace standing in a wooded valley - from which it derives its name - not far from the urban centre of Kilmarnock. Read More »

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle

Ardrossan Castle sits in a prominent position on castle hill above the town and is now in a ruined and dangerous condition. The castle was important during the Scottish - English wars, and was scene to an infamous event known as Wallace's Larder. An English garrison was stationed at the Castle, and Wallace arranged a decoy fire in the village. Read More »

Cessnock Castle

The castle dates from the 15th century, and was a stronghold of the Campbell's. The castle was converted to a mansion house much later in its history. Read More »

Sundrum Castle

The castle is said to be the haunt of a Green Lady, a common legend in castles throughout Scotland. Read More »

Dunure Castle and the Roasted Abbot

Dunure Castle

Once a Kennedy stronghold, this castle is now a crumbling ruin eroding steadily into the sea with every passing Ayrshire winter. In 1570 it was the scene for the legendary roasting of the abbot of Crossraguel. Read More »



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