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St Machar's Cathedral

St Machar's Cathedral-09

Still referred to as a Cathedral, St Machar's has not held a Bishop's seat since the Reformation and is in reality a high kirk. Legend has it that St Machar was informed by God to find a place where a river bends like a bishops crozier and then to establish a church there. Hence in 580 St Machar founded his church in Aberdeen where the River Don flows upon such a route. Read More »

Vernham Dean

The old Roman road called Chute Causeway, is said to be haunted by a pastor who abandoned the villagers of Vernham Dean to die during the Black Death in 1665. Read More »

Wig & Pen, Northampton

Back in 1892 when the Wig & pen was known as The Black Lion it shared a wall with a butcher's warehouse. This warehouse was the scene of a murder, when Andrew MacRae killed Annie Pritchard and her infant child. The torso and legs of Annie Pritchard were discovered in an old sack near Althorp Railway Station on 27th August 1892. Read More »

The Ship Inn, Oundle

The Ship Inn is a 14th century coaching house in picturesque Oundle. It supposed to be haunted by the ghost of a former landlord who committed suicide by jumping out of an upper story bedroom window, breaking his neck. His ghost has been encountered by several subsequent licensees and visitors to the Ship Inn alike.

Burrafirth

Two Norse giants lived on the Isle of Unst, which is the most northerly of the Shetland Islands. One giant was called Herman and his rival was Saxi (Saxa). Read More »

Yarrow

There is a story about a witch from Yarrow. Each night a young boy was transformed into a horse when a local witch slipped a magical bridle over his head whilst he slept. She would ride the boy to her sabbat. One night the boy's older brother tricked the witch and managed to bridle her instead. Read More »

Hill of Fare

The Hill of Fare was the scene of a battle in 1562 between George, the 4th Earl of Huntly and Mary Queen of Scots, his first cousin. Huntly's wife had been in consultation with the witches of Strathbogie who told her that Huntly would be lying in the Tollbooth at Aberdeen without a wound on his body by nightfall. Read More »

The Royal Oak, St Neots

The Royal Oak no longer occupies 38 High Street in St Neots, but in 1963, Mr Hart the Landlord reported a strange and nasty smell that was considered to be paranormal in nature. Earlier in the in 20th century an exorcism was carried out in the building but the reason for it is unknown, though it can be assumed that the haunting went back many years.

Isabel Gowdie, Witch of Auldearn

Isabel (Isobel) Gowdie was a young housewife from Auldearn in Nairnshire who is remembered not just for being tried as a witch, but for her detailed confession. Her trial was in 1662 and what makes her confession so interesting, apart from the detail, is that is that it was supposedly taken without the use of torture. Read More »

Forres

King Duff (930AD-966AD) was son of King Malcolm I and succeeded King Indulf to the throne of Alba (Scotland) in 962AD. Culen, son of Indulf attempted to take the throne in battle but failed. However King Duff fell ill shortly afterwards and in his weakened state could not govern the country properly and rebellions began to break out. Read More »

Noltland Castle

This 16th century heavily fortified castle was built by Gilbert Balfour from Fife, brother-in-law of Mary Queen of Scots. Balfour and his brothers had been involved in the murder of Cardinal Beaton in 1546 and had been sentenced to serve time as oar men on a French galley. Read More »

The Dale Cockatrice

A Cockatrice was supposedly killed here when the peat in which it was hiding were set on fire. It had, according to local tradition been found whilst still in its egg. A woman had got her hen to sit on the egg until it hatched. Unfortunately when it hatched it ate the hen's chicks then ran off. Read More »

Loch Druich Mermaids

Selkies

There is a story connected to Loch Druich and three brothers who happened across a troupe of merfolk. One night the brothers were by the loch side when they saw a group of seals come up onto the beach and shred their furry skins. Beneath the skins were naked people, who danced together on the shore. Read More »

Loch Awe

Loch Awe is Scotlands third largest fresh water loch at with a length of 35km and total surface area of 14.9 miles. It shares a common legend about its creation which concerns a well that flooded. Read More »

Herstmonceux Castle

A 15th Century castle was one of the first to be built from brick. It is a former home of the Royal Observatory (from 1946) and now part of The International Study Centre of Queen's University (Ontario). Read More »

Giants Stone of Tweedsmuir

Three ancient stones on the road to Fruid Reservoir from Tweedsmuir are linked with the legend and death of Jack the Giantkiller. Read More »

Oystermouth Castle

Oystermouth Castle set in the Gower Peninsula was first built in 1106 by William de Londres of Ogmore Castle. In 1116 the Welsh rove him out and burnt the castle down. It was destroyed again by the Welsh in 1137 after being rebuilt. The Gower Lordship was given to John de Braose who also owned Swansea Castle after the area had become more stabilized by 1220. Read More »

Crathes Castle

This 16th Century tower house is haunted allegedly haunted by two ghosts, a Green Lady and another young woman. Read More »

Abbey of Deer

Deer Abbey dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary was a Cistercian House founded in 1219 by the Earl of Buchan, William Comyn which replaced an earlier Celtic monastery in the vicinity was dedicated to Read More »

St Andrew's Churchyard, Rodney Street

Pyramid Tomb

A pyramid monument to the William McKenzie (20 March 1794-29 October 1851) rests in the churchyard of the (currently disused and needing restoration) Scottish Presbyterian Church of St Andrew's, dating from 1824. McKenzie made his fortune as a civil engineer in the Victorian era but it is the nature of his burial, or lack of it that has become legendary. Read More »

Dunnichen Hill

This is the site of the Battle of Nechtansmere found between the Picts and the invading Northumbrians of King Ecgfrith. The battle took place at 3.00pm on 2 March 685AD. The Picts had been subjugated under Drust, a puppet King supported by King Oswui of Northumberland. When Oswui died in 672AD the Picts (called Picti ‘painted ones' by the Romans) overthrew Drust. Read More »

Netley Abbey

Netley Abbey was a Cistercian House founded in 1239 by Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester though he died before it was completed. Henry II took a keen interest in the Abbey and became its royal patron. Read More »

The Rufus Stone

Death of William Rufus

The Rufus stone (now encased in metal) erected by Earl De La Warr in 1745, marks the location where King William II of England (referred to as William Rufus due to his red faced complexion) died in a hunting accident on 2 August 1100. Some mystery still envelopes the events of his death. Read More »

Ballindalloch Castle

Ballindalloch Castle or the ‘Pearl of the North' is the family home of the MacPherson-Grants and has remained in their family since it was built in 1546. It is supposed to be haunted by General James Grant (1722-1806), first British governor of East Florida, veteran of the French war, Indian War and the American War of Independence. Read More »

Battle Abbey

On 14 October 1066 the Battle of Hastings took place. The Saxon King Harold II, defending Britain with 7500 infantry engaged the invading Norman army of William Duke of Normandy. William had mustered a fleet of 700 ships to bring his 2200 cavalry, 1700 archers and 4500 infantry across the English Channel from Northern France. Read More »



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