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The Dale Cockatrice

A Cockatrice was supposedly killed here when the peat in which it was hiding were set on fire. It had, according to local tradition been found whilst still in its egg. A woman had got her hen to sit on the egg until it hatched. Unfortunately when it hatched it ate the hen's chicks then ran off. Read More »

Loch Druich Mermaids

Selkies

There is a story connected to Loch Druich and three brothers who happened across a troupe of merfolk. One night the brothers were by the loch side when they saw a group of seals come up onto the beach and shred their furry skins. Beneath the skins were naked people, who danced together on the shore. Read More »

Loch Awe

Loch Awe is Scotlands third largest fresh water loch at with a length of 35km and total surface area of 14.9 miles. It shares a common legend about its creation which concerns a well that flooded. Read More »

Herstmonceux Castle

A 15th Century castle was one of the first to be built from brick. It is a former home of the Royal Observatory (from 1946) and now part of The International Study Centre of Queen's University (Ontario). Read More »

Giants Stone of Tweedsmuir

Three ancient stones on the road to Fruid Reservoir from Tweedsmuir are linked with the legend and death of Jack the Giantkiller. Read More »

Oystermouth Castle

Oystermouth Castle set in the Gower Peninsula was first built in 1106 by William de Londres of Ogmore Castle. In 1116 the Welsh rove him out and burnt the castle down. It was destroyed again by the Welsh in 1137 after being rebuilt. The Gower Lordship was given to John de Braose who also owned Swansea Castle after the area had become more stabilized by 1220. Read More »

Crathes Castle

This 16th Century tower house is haunted allegedly haunted by two ghosts, a Green Lady and another young woman. Read More »

Abbey of Deer

Deer Abbey dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary was a Cistercian House founded in 1219 by the Earl of Buchan, William Comyn which replaced an earlier Celtic monastery in the vicinity was dedicated to Read More »

St Andrew's Churchyard, Rodney Street

Pyramid Tomb

A pyramid monument to the William McKenzie (20 March 1794-29 October 1851) rests in the churchyard of the (currently disused and needing restoration) Scottish Presbyterian Church of St Andrew's, dating from 1824. McKenzie made his fortune as a civil engineer in the Victorian era but it is the nature of his burial, or lack of it that has become legendary. Read More »

Dunnichen Hill

This is the site of the Battle of Nechtansmere found between the Picts and the invading Northumbrians of King Ecgfrith. The battle took place at 3.00pm on 2 March 685AD. The Picts had been subjugated under Drust, a puppet King supported by King Oswui of Northumberland. When Oswui died in 672AD the Picts (called Picti ‘painted ones' by the Romans) overthrew Drust. Read More »

Netley Abbey

Netley Abbey was a Cistercian House founded in 1239 by Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester though he died before it was completed. Henry II took a keen interest in the Abbey and became its royal patron. Read More »

The Rufus Stone

Death of William Rufus

The Rufus stone (now encased in metal) erected by Earl De La Warr in 1745, marks the location where King William II of England (referred to as William Rufus due to his red faced complexion) died in a hunting accident on 2 August 1100. Some mystery still envelopes the events of his death. Read More »

Ballindalloch Castle

Ballindalloch Castle or the ‘Pearl of the North' is the family home of the MacPherson-Grants and has remained in their family since it was built in 1546. It is supposed to be haunted by General James Grant (1722-1806), first British governor of East Florida, veteran of the French war, Indian War and the American War of Independence. Read More »

Battle Abbey

On 14 October 1066 the Battle of Hastings took place. The Saxon King Harold II, defending Britain with 7500 infantry engaged the invading Norman army of William Duke of Normandy. William had mustered a fleet of 700 ships to bring his 2200 cavalry, 1700 archers and 4500 infantry across the English Channel from Northern France. Read More »

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

The Dolphin Hotel

The Dolphin is an old coaching inn dating back to 1735. In the summer of 1806 the poet Lord Byron stayed at the Dolphin Hotel and supposedly nearly drowned as he was swimming in the nearby River Arun. The Dolphin would appear to be haunted by several different ladies and some ghostly children which have been seen and heard. Read More »

Holland House

Holland House 1896

Situated in a 500 acre estate, some of which is now survives as Holland Park, the house was originally known as Cope Castle and was built in 1605 for Sir Walter Cope. His daughter married Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland (1590 - 9 March 1649) who inherited the property and is said to haunt it. Read More »

Silbury Hill

Silbury Hill

This hill is the biggest man made mound in Europe. It is 130 feet high and 100 feet across its flat top surface.

The hill was built around 2500BC, formed with some of the chalk from the great henge at Avebury, and built in a complex lattice structure of in-filled chalk walls. Read More »

Cley Hill

Cley Hill 2

Cley hill has a Devil legend attached to it. The Devil was travelling from Somerset carrying a huge sack of earth, with which he intended to bury the town of Devises. The people of the town had offended him in some way probably by converting to Christianity. Read More »

Westbury White Horse

Westbury White Horse

A conventional looking horse it measures 107 feet tall and 175 feet across. The horse sits below Bratton Hill Iron Age fort. The hillfort has a Bronze Age barrow within its fortifications suggesting an earlier heritage. Read More »

Warminster

Warminster was the centre of a UFO flap during the 1960s and 70s and became a UFO Mecca for many years. UFO groups and interested people held many sky watches in the area. Specifically from Cradle Hill and Starr Hill.

10 August 1965 Read More »

Woodhenge

Woodhenge

Woodhenge is much older than Stonehenge and is aligned to the Midsummer sunrise. The monument consisted of concentric rings of tall wooden posts and must have been an impressive sight when it was completed. Rings of concrete markers now mark where the posts would have originally stood. Read More »

Longleat House

Longleat House

Longleat House is the home of the Thynne family and was built on the site of an old priory. The house like many of the old family stately homes has a multitude of ghost stories. Read More »

Winklebury Camp

Local folklore suggests that if you walk around the Iron Age hillfort seven times at midnight, the Devil will appear on a large black horse and grant one wish.

Only brave people should attempt this as the Devil will always try to trick people into losing their souls to him.

Woodminton

Patty's Bottom, a valley near Woodminton is described as being haunted by the tramping of feet and a headless horse as the site was the scene of a bloody battle between the Britons and the Romans.

Oldbury Castle and Cherhill White Horse

Cherhill White Horse

This hillfort that covers 9 hectares or 22 acres was occupied in Roman times, and it is said to be haunted by ghostly Roman soldiers. They have been seen on a road near to the camp. The camp itself sits upon a bronze age settlement and evidence of post Roman occupation has also been found. Read More »



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