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Dun Borranish

This ruined dun is said to have been the home of a giant called Cuithach, who in the tradition of most giants, laid waste to the surrounding area by stealing cattle and killing local people. Read More »


Jupiter was the supreme god of the Romans, and the Lord of the Heavens and the Sky.

Being the lord of the skies he was responsible for all the weather, especially thunder and lightning, he was sometimes referred to as the Thunderer for this reason. Read More »


Mars is the Roman god of war and also of agriculture. He was very important to the Romans because he was the father of Romulus and Remus, the mythical founders of Rome.

In the beginning Mars was seen as more of an agricultural or pastoral god, this still had relevance, even after he became more and more associated with war. Read More »


A goddess of the moon and wild places, Diana is the primal powerful goddess and the 'Queen of Heaven' in the Roman Pantheon. Read More »



The horse was very important in Celtic society, and the main goddess associated with the horse was Epona, worshiped widely throughout Britain and the Continent during the Iron Age and Roman Period. Read More »

Loki, The Trickster

Loki, the trickster god, was the most malignant of the Nordic gods, but he could swing from the role of malicious trickster, to the one who baled the gods out of trouble. Read More »

Odin, The All Knowing


The Germanic god of wisdom, war and magic, he was worshiped throughout Britain, wherever the Vikings and other Nordic tribes settled. Many places are named after him, or from derivations of his name. Read More »

Frigg, Queen of Heaven

Frigg is the mother goddess of the Nordic pantheon, as the wife of Odin she is one of the most powerful goddesses, and 'Queen of the Heavens'.

She was the daughter of Nott and Nat and the mother of Baldur, the fairest of the gods. Read More »

Hel, Queen of Hell

One of the foul creations from the coupling of Loki and the giant Angrboda, Hel was the ruler of the netherworld (Niflheim or Helheim) where men who died out of battle went.

Her realm also had a place for criminals, oath-breakers and assassins, all taboo in Nordic society. Read More »

Balder (Baldur/Baldr), The Shinning God

Balder was known as the 'Shinning God' or the 'Bleeding God' and was the fairest of all the gods in the Germanic pantheon. He was tragically killed by the trickery of Loki. Read More »

Wayland, Welund, Volund

Wayland was the traditional Saxon god of smiths who became amalgamated into fairy lore. Many places are associated with Wayland in the British Isles, in particular Wayland's Smithy, a Neolithic burial chamber in Oxfordshire. He is associated with horses, magic, metalworking, cunning, skill and healing. Read More »



Fenrir was the first-born offspring of Loki - the god of trickery - and the giant Angrboda, their other foul creations being Hel and Jormungand. Read More »

Mithra (Mithras)

The Sun God worshipped throughout the Roman Empire since it was first encountered by them in Persia during the reign of Emperor Nero. Mithra was born from a rock within a cave, and his birth was witnessed by a group of shepherds. He has also been depicted as being born from a tree, and at Housesteads on Hadrians Wall, there was a tradition that he came forth from a Cosmic Egg. Read More »



Tales of mermaids have been around for centuries, and form a large part of seafaring lore, especially round the coastal areas of Britain such as Cornwall, and the Northern Isles of Scotland. Their sighting was thought to be a bad omen, foretelling storms and rough seas. There are numerous folk tales describing their interaction with humans. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1542

The Bill ayest conjuraracons & wichecraftes and sorcery and enchantmants. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1547

An Acte for the Repeale of certain Statutes, etc. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1563

An Act agaynst Conjuracons Inchantments and Witchecraftes. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1580

An Acte against sedicious Wordes and Rumours uttered againste the queenes moste excellent Majestie. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1604

An Acte against conjuration Witchcrafte and dealinge with evill and wicked Spirits. Read More »

Witchcraft Act 1763

An Act to repeal the Statute made in the First Year of the Reign of King James the First, intituled, An Act against Conjuration, Witchcraft, and dealing with evil and wicked Spirits, except so much thereof as repeals an Act of the Fifth Year of the Reign of Queen Elizabeth, Against Conjurations, Inchantments, and Witchcrafts, and to repeal an Act passed in the Parliament of Scotland in the Nint Read More »

Whitby Abbey

Whitby Abbey 2

Whitby Abbey is one of the most atmospheric locations in England. The desolate ruins stand stark above steep cliffs overlooking the old whaling village of Whitby in North Yorkshire, a testament to the town's former religious significance. Read More »


The Wise man of a stokesley a man called Wrightson is reputed to have been a great seer and healer. The 7th son of a 7th daughter he was especially famed for healing cattle and his far sight. He died in the 1900s. Many villages had such wise men and women famed for their powers.

Middleham Castle

Middleham Castle

The castle is reputed to be the site of a buried hoard of treasure, to find it you must run a round the castle three times, and where you stop the treasure will be found. Unfortunately there is no indication of where you should start.

Directions: Off the A6108 to the South of Leyburn.

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Scarborough Castle

Scarborugh Castle 1

The castle is said to be haunted by the headless phantom of Piers Gaveston, the favourite of Edward II. Read More »

The Three Mariners Inn, Scarborough

The Three Mariners

The Three Mariners Inn - which is now a museum dedicated to the history of smuggling in the area - dates back to the 1300s and, is the earliest licensed premises in Scarborough.

It is said to be haunted by a headless woman, who warns fishermen of impending disaster. Read More »



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