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Quarr Abbey

The abbey is said to be haunted by Eleanor of Aquataine - Henry II's queen, who was exiled here before her death in France in 1204.

Monks also celebrated a feast of fools here on New Years Day; the festival was thought to be christianised version of the Roman festivals Saturnalia, and Bachanalia.

Dunnose Point

HMS Eurdice

Dunnose Point is haunted by a ghost ship - the HMS Eurydice - which sank in bad weather on the 24th of March 1878, claiming over 300 lives. The waters around the Isle of Wight have claimed many ships, and there are other stories of phantom ships around these waters. Read More »

Carisbrooke Castle

Carisbrook Castle Gatehouse

Carisbrooke castle is one of the most impressive historic sites on the Isle of Wight, and was the chief medieval stronghold on the Isle of Wight, so much so that tradition asserts that whoever owned the castle also controlled the Isle of Wight. Read More »

The Longstone at Mottistone

Longstone at Mottistone

This impressive standing stone and its smaller recumbent companion, are believed to be all that is left of a chambered long barrow from the Neolithic period, the remaining stones once being part of the tomb entrance.   Read More »

The Five Barrows

This Bronze Age barrow cemetery consists of eight barrows, despite what the name of the site suggests. It is thought that the barrows were constructed over a long period of time perhaps as much as 500 years, suggesting the site may have been seen as a special place, reserved for the important members of the community. Read More »

Peel Castle

Located on St Patrick's Isle, Peel, Isle of Man, the castle is reached over a causeway. The castle buildings are now in ruin but the outer walls are mostly intact. The first fortifications were built by the King Magnus Barelegs of Norway in the 11th Century. The Viking castle was made of wood, though there were earlier Celtic monastic structures on the island. Read More »

Gef, The Talking Mongoose

It was in September 1931 that the Irving family of Doarlish Cashen, on the Isle of Man, came to prominence by reputedly being 'haunted' by a talking mongoose. Gef, as the animal preferred to be called, attracted wide media interest - even being investigated by Harry Price and Nandor Fodor. But what was Gef? Read More »

Cabyll-Ushtey

Water Horses

These are the water horses of the Isle of Man and they are said to be just as dangerous as their Scottish counterparts, the Each Uisge or the Aughisky of Ireland. Read More »

The Rudston Monolith

Rudston Monolith

Standing in the Norman churchyard of All Saints Church, the Rudston Monolith is the highest standing stone in Great Britain at 7.6m (25ft) with a 5m circumference and an estimated weight of 40 Tonnes.

An experiment run by William Strickland in the 18th century suggests the stone may extend underground to a similar depth as it high above ground. Read More »

Harpham

The drumming well located near to the church is reputed to foretell death in the family of St Quentin. The folklore relates to a story about a fourteenth century drummer called Tom Hewson, who was accidentally knocked down the well by a St Quentin squire. Read More »

St Albans Abbey

St Alban's Abbey

St Albans has a multitude of ghosts and strange stories, many of which are attached to the magnificent abbey. St Albans has been occupied from very early in its history, the Roman town of Verulamium once stood in the valley, in the area where the public park now lies. Read More »

Minsden Chapel

Minsden Chapel is now nothing more than a ruin, standing isolated amidst trees in the Hertfordshire countryside. The site is very atmospheric, given its isolated position and long history. The haunting of the chapel is one of the best known in Hertfordshire, mainly because it has been widely investigated. Read More »

The Brocket Arms, Ayot St Lawrence

This old pub, parts of which date to the 14th Century, was a stop of point for pilgrims on their way to St Albans Abbey. It is not far from Minsden Chapel, which is also haunted. A local legend suggests a tunnel exists from the pub to the Chapel or to the ruined church in the village, which is most likely a memory of the route taken by pilgrims. Read More »

The White Hart, Hemel Hempstead

The White Hart is said to be haunted by the ghost of a young man who was murdered while fighting off a press gang. He is thought to have died at the bottom of the stairs, where the figure of a man has been seen with a look of terror on his face.

Knebworth House

Knebworth has a number of legends and ghost stories, it was home to Sir Bulwer Lytton, the Victorian author with an avid interest in the occult. He was certainly involved with many people who were major players in occult thought from that time, including Eliphas Levi, the famous French Magus who visited Knebworth on several occasions. Read More »

Hatfield House

Hatfield House, standing in a park near to St Etheldreda's church in the old part of Hatfield, is said to be haunted by a ghostly coach and horses. They drive up to the house, through the doors and up the stairs.

Directions:
In the old part of Hatfield off the A1000.

Burnham Green

The area is said to be haunted by headless horses, especially in the vicinity of a sunken lane to Welwyn village.

Sunken lanes are trackways, which pass below the level of the surrounding countryside, often with steep banks. Many are considered very ancient, the remnants of old trackways perhaps dating as far back as the Bronze Age. Read More »

St Mary's Church, Ashwell

A headless ghost dressed in black is supposed to haunt the churchyard.

Directions:
Reached via a minor road off the A505 at Slip End.

Wigginton Common

During the English Civil War, Wigginton Common served as camp for some of Cromwell's troops. They used it as a base from where they could bombard Berkhamstead castle. There have been reports of Roundheads, seen on the common in the evening at twilight as the light begins to fade. Read More »

The Six Hills, Stevenage

The six hills which occupy prominence in the town are tumuli or Round Barrows dating from the Bronze Age. According to legend the hills are spade fulls of earth taken from Whomerly wood and thrown at the town by a giant (or the Devil) intent on destruction. His last shot went well off mark and knocked the steeple off Gravely Church two miles away. Read More »

Royston Cave

Underneath the streets of Royston, below the ancient Icknield way lies a secret cave, rediscovered in 1702 and dating back perhaps a thousand years. The cave, which is a bell shaped hole carved from the solid chalk, has a multitude of early Christian carvings depicting saints and religious scenes. Read More »

The Devil's Dyke

Two giant earthworks named the Devil's Dyke and the Slad, enclose and area of around 40 hectares to the South of St Albans. The area was excavated in 1932 by Sir Mortimer Wheeler, and the ditch was found to have had an original depth of nearly thirteen metres making it a huge undertaking. Read More »

Jack o' Legs

This folktale was kindly brought to our attention by Alma Oakley of Weston in Hertfordshire.

Weston churchyard is reputed to be the final resting place of the Weston Giant: Jack o' Legs. Two stones mark his grave. One is positioned at his head and another at his feet, a distance of eight feet apart. Read More »

The Angel Hotel, Lymington

The pub is reputed to be haunted by two ghosts. One is the tall ghost of a seaman, dressed in a naval coat, and the other is thought to be that of a coachman, who is seen standing looking out of the kitchen window. The hotel was an old coaching Inn, and was used by the local shipbuilders as a hostelry.

The Brushmakers Arms, Upham

This building dates back over 600 years and has seen many uses. Apart from being a pub, it has been a private house, a school and also a brushmakers which is where it's name originates. It is though that the pub may be haunted by Mr Chicket, who is thought to be the original brushmaker. Read More »



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