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The Devils Bridge

Devils Bridge

There are three bridges over this part of the Mynach Gorge, each one built successively over the others, as they needed to be improved for traffic. The lowest of the bridges dating from the 11th century is the original one and is associated with a Devil legend that is common in Britain with minor variations from place to place. Read More »

Bardsey Island

Bardsey Island (P)

The island is also known as the island of the currents and the saints. There are said to be the graves of 20,000 saints interred on the island, and legend suggests that anybody buried here will not go to hell no matter how wicked his deeds. Read More »

Bryn Hall

Bryn Hall was haunted by the ghost of a headless horseman. The haunting is said to have ceased after one of the servants received a message from the horseman pertaining to the location of a buried body.

The body was that of an illegitimate child belonging to the Lord of the hall.

Aberdyfi and Cardigan Bay

The area around Cardigan Bay has a number of 'lost land' legends pertaining to it. These legends have changed over the centuries.

The most recent story concerns 'The Lost Lowland Hundred'; lands now drowned which were ruled by a King called Gwyddno Garantir. The area was protected from the sea by a system of sluices, dams and waterways. Read More »

The Lost Land of Wales

This tale is one of two stories of a similar theme attached to Cardigan Bay in Gwynedd. This story is the later one of the two and explains how a realm was lost to the sea through debauchery and drunkenness. There are traces of walls and roadways under the sea at Cardigan Bay, they can be seen at low tide and may have given rise to the legend of the 'Lost Lowland Hundred'. Read More »

Carreg Cennen Castle

The ruined castle has a wishing well, which had the ability to heal eye and ear disorders. The well is reached via an underground tunnel that leads to a cave. Traditionally one had to leave a pin in its waters and then make the wish. Prehistoric skeletons have also been uncovered from within this cave, and it is likely that it was used in ancient times as a place of reverence. Read More »

Barclodiad-y-Gawres Chambered Cairn

Bar Carvings

This burial mound has five carved stones within its chamber, now capped by concrete to prevent their erosion. The stones are carved with a range of patterns including spirals cup marks and zig-zag features. The purpose of these marks is unknown, but they may have had some ritual function. Read More »

Llanarth Church

Llanarth church is associated with a legend of the Devil; unusually the Devil creeps into the church and tries to steal one of the church bells. (It is more common for him to steal the whole church). In the process of his theft he wakes the vicar who challenges him with the name of Christ. Eventually the Devil concedes, and jumps off the church tower. Read More »

Pistyll Teilo

This pool and waterfall lie in a ravine below an old ruined curch dedicated to St Teilo (Capel Teilo). The water from the waterfall has long been thought to have healing properties, it was said to heal bruises and other ailments including rheumatism and sprains. All you had to do was hold the affected part in the main stream of icy water for a short while. Read More »

Llyn Llech Owain (The Lake of Owen's Flag)

Folklore suggests that this lake was created when a well overflowed on Mynydd Mawr. The well keeper was a man called Owain (Owen), and one day after letting his horse drink from the cool waters, he forgot to replace the large stone slab that capped the well. Read More »

Llddwyn Island

This island is connected by a sandy beach to Anglesey, and was home in the Dark Ages to a religious community, founded by the female Saint Dwynwen. St Dwynwen is a patron saint of Welsh lovers, and after her death the island became an important place of pilgrimage. Read More »


Bedd-yr-Afanc means the monsters grave, the Afanc being a name commonly given to a water monster in Wales. The grave is actually the only Bronze Age Gallery Grave in Wales and dates from around 1500BC. Just two rows of parallel stones survive. According to legend the Afanc used to dwell in a pool by Brynberian Bridge, and was captured and killed then buried in this mound on the hillside. Read More »


Snowdon 1

Standing 3650 ft above sea level, Snowdon is the highest peak in Wales, second highest mountain in Britain and is also probably the busiest due to it popularity with hillwalkers. Read More »

Pentre Ifan

Pentre Ifan

This is one of the most recognisable chambered cairns in Wales, with a huge capstone supported by the points of 3 upright stones. Read More »

Bedd Branwen

The chambered tomb called the Bedd Branwen, is said to be the resting place of Branwen, the legendary wife of Bran described in early Welsh stories.

Directions: To the East of Elim.

Bryn Celli Dhu

Bryn Celli Ddu

The name of this site translates as the mound in the dark grove. It is a developed site, which changed in ritual use and importance during the Neolithic and Bronze age period. Read More »


This mountain has long been associated with the fairies and is traditionally an entrance to the other world.

Directions: To the West of Crymych

Gors-Fawr Stone Circle

The circle consists of 16 standing stones with a diameter of 22.3 metres, 72 feet. Towards the Northeast of the circle are two outlying standing stones. It is not clear whether they are related to the circle and may date from an earlier or later timescale.

Directions: Off a minor road from the A478, signposted

Bryn Myrddin (Merlin's Hill)

The hill is one of many places in Britain reputed to be the prison of Merlin, where Merlin lies asleep in a cave awaiting the call to return and help his fellow countrymen. According to tradition it is possible to hear his groans from under the hill if you listen hard enough. In legend Merlin was born in Carmarthen 2 miles away from the hill. Read More »

Harper's Pool

A pool in the river Teifi called 'The Pool of the Harper' is said to be haunted by the ghost of a harper, who drowned there many years ago. He makes his presence felt by wistful songs that can only be heard by certain people.

Dinas Emrys

Dinas Emrys

The legendary stronghold of Vortigern, and the place where the young prophet Merlin revealed the fighting dragons.  In legend there are two characters associated with the same story with slight variations. One is Vortigern, the Dark Age ruler who let the Saxons into the country, and was responsible in part for their later invasions. Read More »

Yr Ogaf Ddu (The Black Cave), Near Criccieth

This cave is associated with a legend common in Britain, that of pipers disappearing into the fairy realm.

Four pipers went into this cave to commune with the fairies, but they never returned. Their piping can still be heard when the air is quiet.

Cader Idris

Cader Idris

This holy mountain has a rock seat called 'The Seat of Prince Idris'. It is said that anyone who spends the night alone on the mountain will either die, become insane or become a poet.

The seat of Prince Idris is also known as the Chair of Idris, and was named after a giant who was said to view the heavens from this lofty point. Read More »

Carn March Arthur

A rock overlooking the Dovey Estuary, on a hill above the A493, bears a depression that is said to be the hoofprint of Arthur's horse.

Directions: The rock lies above the A493.

Holyhead UFO

In 1743 a farmer near Holyhead, Anglesey is alleged to have witnessed a 'boat' sailing in the clouds at about 1500 feet. The story appeared in the 'Flying Saucer Review' in 1971.



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