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Gold Hill Black Dog

There is a black dog tradition thought to be attached to Gold Hill in Batcombe, described as having a chain around its neck. The associated story suggests that the dog’s owner in life buried it in woodland nearby.

Banwell Cross

A two feet high pillow mound earthwork shaped as a cross in Banwell has a Devil legend attached to it. According to the story, the villagers of Banwell attempted to erect a large cross on Banwell Hill, but each night the Devil would come along and blow it down. In order to prevent this the villagers decided to create the cross on the ground making it difficult for the Devil to destroy. Read More »

Mecure Blackburn Dunkenhalgh Hotel and Spa

The 175 room, 4 star Mercure Blackburn Dunkenhalgh Hotel, is thought to be haunted by Lucette, a pretty, young, French governess for the Petre family who lived at Dunkenhalgh Hall when it was still a home. Read More »

Tyrone's Bed

A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 5 (1911) explains that 'On the north side of Marland, by the Roch, is a wooded clough known as Tyrone's Bed, a story invented by Roby and William Nuttall (d. 1840) gaining currency that the Earl of Tyrone, outlawed by Elizabeth, took refuge there.' Below is the story of Hugh O'Neill (Hugh The Great O'Neill) (Born c. Read More »

Bath Assembly Rooms

The Grade I listed Bath Assembly Rooms date from 1769 and were designed by John Wood, the Younger (Born 25 February 1728 – Died 18 June 1782). It is said to be haunted by a thin hunched figure wearing a black robe and large black hat. This figure is also thought the Saville Row which is behind the Assembly Rooms. Read More »

19 Bennett Street, Bath

Admiral Arthur Phillip, the First Governor of Australia lived at 19 Bennett Street in Bath from 1806 and died here in 1814. The Dictionary of National Biography gives th efollowing account of his life and career. 'PHILLIP, ARTHUR (1738–1814), vice-admiral and first governor of New South Wales, was born in the parish of Allhallows, Bread Street, London, on 11 Oct. 1738. Read More »

20 Henrietta Street, Bath

20 Henrietta Street is thought to be haunted by the disembodied footsteps of Rear Admiral Mark Robinson (25 April 1722 – 23 November 1799). Read More »

71 Great Pulteney Street, Bath

The plaque outside 71 Great Pulteney Street reads ‘Admiral Earl Howe K.G. lived here in 1794, 1795 & 1798. B. 1725 d. 1799’ and according to some sources his apparition was seen during the 1970’s in his uniform. Read More »

Mansfield Street, Glasgow

The following article entitled 'Ghost is no joke for the Hanlons' was published in the Glasgow Evening Times on 7 August 1961.

“We’ll never go near it again”

A shaken, sleepless man sat resting in his mother’s home to-day while six miles away a whole street argued furiously about the ghost he left behind him. Read More »

St Margaret's Church, Hornby

The Grade I listed St Margaret's Church in Hornby was founded by Sir Edward Stanley, Lord Mounteagle, in 1514, the tower of which still stands. (An earlier church had been on the site dating from around 1338). Read More »

Henrietta Street, Bath

John Ingram in his 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain' (1897) gives the following description of a haunting realated to a murder in Henrietta Street. 'Other tales, more or less circumstantial, have been related to us of houses in Bath, including one in Henrietta Street, Great Pulteney Street. Read More »

Villa Fields, Bath

Named after the Bathwick Villa (Built 1777 – Demolished 1897), the area around what is now Forester Road was known as Villa Fields. Read More »

Landsdown Crescent, Bath

Designed by John Palmer (Born 1738 – Died 19 July 1817), Lansdown Crescent is great example of Georgian architecture. Made up of twenty houses built between 1789 and 1793, Lansdown Crescent is Grade I. In 1897, John Ingram mentioned the following haunting in his 'The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain'. Read More »

St Andrew’s Church, Banwell

The following article entitled ‘The Glory of Banwell Church’, edited by Jill Bailey, was originally published on 28 September 1963 and republished in the The Weston Mercury on 23 May 2008. Read More »

ASSAP PROFESSIONAL CODE OF ETHICS

Applicability Note: This code applies to members of ASSAP that choose to join the National Register of Professional Investigators. Members of the NRPI should follow the code in all cases, regardless of whether they are ASSAP cases, except where they opt out of NRPI rules for any case. In such cases the opting out should be made clear to clients and in any publicity and subsequent reports. Read More »

Naked Ghost

According to ‘They Still Serve: A Complete Guide to the Military Ghosts of Britain’ by Richard McKenzie ‘Tradition States that the naked ghost of a Roman soldier has been seen running around the centre of the town. It is said that a police officer once gave chase to the phantom streaker only to watch it fade into nothing. Read More »

Shute Shelve Hill

Shute Shelve Hill stands at 764ft overlooking the town of Axbridge. In the 17th century Shute Shelve was used as a site of public execution and is thought to be haunted a woman and two men that were hanged there for the murder of the womans husband.

Black Figures of Cwmorthin

The disused Cwmorthin Slate Quarry can be found on the shore of Llyn Cwmorthin above Blaenau Ffestiniog. The following description of a strange experience was e-mailed into Mysterious Britain early in 2013 and I would be very interested to hear from anybody who could add more. “Start from Blaenau Ffestiniog. Read More »

Black Abbey, Accrington

Three Cistercian monks were murdered by the inhabitants of Accrington in the late 13th century and according to tradition a local haunting dates back to this time. 'A History of the County of Lancaster: Volume 6' (1911) gives the following information about the historical events.
Read More »

Mount Everest

The peak of Mount Everest stands at 8,848 metres (29,029 feet) above sea level, making it the tallest mountain on Earth*. Over the years it has claimed many lives as people have attempted to reach the summit and one of these climbers is thought to haunt the slopes after he died in 1924. Read More »

Whalley Abbey

In 1296, Cistercian monks moved from Stanlow Abbey and founded Whalley Abbey, with the first stone being laid by Henry de Lacy, 3rd Earl of Lincoln, Baron of Pontefract, 10th Baron of Halton, Lord of Denbigh and 7th Lord of Bowland (Born 1251 – Died February 1311). Following the dissolution of the monasteries, Whalley Abbey was closed in 1537 and now stands in ruins. Read More »

Kenilworth Castle

Dating from around 1120, Kenilworth Castle has been described as "the finest surviving example of a semi-royal palace of the later middle ages, significant for its scale, form and quality of workmanship”. It may also be significant for its number of reputed ghosts. Read More »

The Siege of Lathom

Siege of Lathom

Nothing now remains of the original Lathom House, the last Royalist stronghold in Lancashire, which was besieged by Parliamentarian forces for three months in 1644. Read More »

The Bull's Head, Earlswood

Recently (April 2013) re-opened the The Bull’s Head on Limekiln Lane in Earlswood has been a public house since 1832, though the building dates back to 1740 when it was used by navies working on the Stratford Upon Avon canal. Their website states that it is rumored to be haunted by a ghost of a lime kiln worker.

A3400 Road Ghost

Reputedly a farmer who lost his life after hitting a branch during whilst racing between Atherstone on Stour and Alderminster haunts the A3400. Local tradition suggests that if he is seen once, he will appear on another two occasions.



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