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Hardknott Roman Fort (Mediobogdvm)

The Roman Fort of Mediobogdvm, above Hardknott Pass, is said to hold a fairy rath where King Eveling holds his court. Hardnott Pass can be found at the end of the Eskdale Valley and is also one of the steepest roads in Cumbria.

Elva Hill

Elva Hill

Elva Hill is known as a fairy hill and the name may be derived from an old Viking name meaning place of the elves. A stone circle on its slope suggests ancient ritual use of the area, only 15 stones of the original 30 remain. The circle is on private land belonging to Elva Farm, but there is a nearby footpath. The site is thought to date from Neolithic times. Read More »

Castle Howe

The site of a fairy home on the banks of Bassenthwaite Lake.

The Beetham Fairy Steps

The fairy steps, West of the church are steps cut into the limestone rock. If you can climb them without touching either side you will be granted a wish by the fairies.

Directions: Reached from a footpath through woodland to the South West of Beetham and South East of Storth.

Gosforth Hall Hotel

Room 11 of this old building dating back to 1658 is reputedly haunted by a figure some have described as resembling a friar. He sits by the entrance to the 'priests hole' which leads from this room to the bar fireplace in the bar below. Pewtar tankards have also been known to fly across the bar after unhooking themselves and an old man is supposed to glide through the bar. Read More »

Irton Cross and Church

Irton Cross

There are two Celtic Crosses in Irton Churchyard, one is truly ancient and the other is a copy of the former incorporated into more modern grave. The ancient cross is thought to date from the early ninth century, before the Norsemen invaded the area. Read More »

Gosforth Chapel

Gosforth Cross

This must have been an important place of worship to the Norse invaders, and to later generations judging by the wealth of important early Christian relics here. The actual church has been renovated several times and much of the older structure has been destroyed. Read More »

Burgh Marsh

The Solway Photograph

24th May 1964, Jim Templeton (then 44) on an outing with his wife and two daughters, took a picture of his daughter holding a posy of wild flowers near a stretch of marshland by the Solway Firth. When this was developed it showed what appeared to be a white-suited entity wearing a black visor standing behind his daughter in a strange perspective. Read More »

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle is one of the finest in Cumbria, it is spectacularly situated within a panorama of rugged hills of ever changing character, depending on the mercurial Lakeland weather. Read More »

Wasdale Corpse Road

As Wasdale had no church early in its history, the deceased had to be carried over the fells to Eskdale for internment, and this route became known as the corpse road. This is haunted by the ghost of a horse carrying the body of woman tied to it. Read More »

The Stainton Ghost

The Cumberland News, 30/06/1999 had an article by Ruth Berry and Gill Hands about the Stainton Ghost. According to the story, a church or abbey once stood near the village and human bones were found among the ruins. During the reformation the land upon which this holy building stood fell into the hands of a certain baron, now nameless. Read More »

The Spital Inn And The Hand of Glory

A Hand of Glory was used by a gang of thieves in an attempt to rob the long gone Spital Inn, North Stainmore in 1797. Read More »

The Renwick Cockatrice

Cockatrice

In 1733 a cockatrice terrorized Renwick when the church was being demolished. The beast was slayen by John Tallantire with a rowan branch. The creature was described as resembling a bat. Apparently the cockatrice was again reported as having been seen in 1959. Read More »

Armboth House

Armboth House was haunted following the drowning of the households daughter on the night before her wedding day. It is said that bells could be heard, a ghostly dog could be seen swimming in Thirlmere Lake (where she was murdered) and reception meal places laid out by some spirit, all taking place on the anniversary of that fateful night, which just happens to be Halloween. Read More »

Calgarth Hall

According to legend, the owners, a Mr and Mrs Kraster Cook were framed one Christmas by Myles Phillipson, a magistrate. He planted a silver cup upon their persons when they came around to visit him. The crime was punishable by death and Phillipson gained control of Calgarth Hall, a sixteenth century manor house, but not before being cursed by Mrs Dorothy Cook. Read More »

Naworth Castle

Haunted by a 'White Lady', the spirit of a girl who was seduced by Lord Dacre without knowing his identity. She became pregnant and upon discovering Lord Dacres rank and social standing, she realised they would never be together as she was of a lower class. She through herslf into a stream and drowned. The body was discovered by Lord Dacre, his bride to be and the dead girls mother. Read More »

Upper Denton

The local church made from the distinctive stones taken from Hadrian's Wall dates back to Saxon times. The churchyard holds the grave of Margaret Teasdale who died aged ninety-eight in 1777. Items found in her home after her death led the locals to believe she had an interest in the occult and she has been regarded as a witch since then.

St Cuthbert's Churchyard, Carlisle

St Cuthberts

The graveyard of this old church was the scene of grave robbing, along with other sites in Carlisle during the 1820s.

Victoria Viaduct, Carlisle

A former bank that was converted into a jeweller's around 1959 was haunted. Footsteps could be heard on the tall flight of steps within the building but nobody could account for them. They finally stopped when the floor was lifted and an old well uncovered. The well had been partially filled and when they were emptying it they discovered a headless skeleton. Read More »

Carlisle Cathedral

Carlisle Cathedral

In 1868, a midget wearing old fashioned clothes and silver buckles on his shoes, was seen in the streets near the Cathedral but quickly vanished.

West Walls, Carlisle

West Walls

The ghost of a Cavalier has been seen close to the West Walls early some mornings, though I am unaware of anyone seeing him recently. The West Walls are the last remaining example of Carlisle's defensive wall that encircled the early city. They served the city well especially during the Civil War when Carlisle was besieged by Cromwell's soldiers during 1644 and 1645. Read More »

Keswick's Moot Hall

Keswick Moot Hall

The News & Star reported the following in an article by Ross Brewster on Thursday 8 March 2001. 'Men working on a facelift for Keswicks Moot Hall have been.. spooked by a ghost in the tower. The first sighting was reported by a labourer sweeping up in the corner of the tower. Read More »

Jan Tregeagle

The legend of the torments of Jan Tregeagle stretch from the bleak moors of Bodmin, to the lonely beaches of Land's End. He has been identified by some as a forgotten Celtic god who still haunts the landscape. Read More »

Bolster and St Agnes

Bolster's Stride

In the time of giants in the Penwith area of Cornwall, there lived a particularly troublesome giant called Bolster, who was of such enormous stature that he could stand with one foot on Carn Brae, and the other on the beacon near St Agnes, a distance of 6 miles. Read More »

The Giant Comoran

Jack slaying Comoran

Cormoran was the name given to the giant who is said to have built and lived on St Michael's Mount, he was killed by Jack the giant slayer. Read More »



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