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Roche Rock

A chapel, dedicated to St Michael, was built on this rock in 1409 by a hermit. Traditionally a leper is said to have taken refuge here.

The area is reputed to be haunted by a miner, he makes his presence known either by making noises within the chapel, or by a shadow that flits from rock to rock with no earthly presence to cast it. Read More »

Land's End

Beyond Land's End stretching to the Isles of Scilly, the lost land of Lyonnesse is reputed to lie. The land is said to have been engulfed by the sea over 900 years ago.

According to tradition the only survivor of the sinking was a man called Trevilian, who rode a white horse before the waves. The family crest shows the image of this white horse. Read More »

Morgawr

Morgawr, which is old Cornish for sea monster and has been seen several times this century.

There have been many sightings since 1926 and some photographs have been taken showing a dark mass with several humps. As with many monster photographs none of the pictures are clear enough to make any snap judgements. Read More »

Loe Pool

The Pool has a King Arthur legend, and along with Dozmary pool is supposedly the body of water from which he received Excalibur from the lady of the lake.

A high bar of shingle, called Loe bar separates the pool from the sea. Jan Tregeagle is supposed to have been tripped by demons while engaged in one of his tasks. He dropped a sack full of sand and created Loe Bar. Read More »

Dozmary Pool

Dozmary Pool

Dozmary Pool is associated with many legends. It is suspected of being the body of water into which Sir Bedivere threw Excalibur after King Arthur was mortally wounded. The pool is also said to be a haunt of the Lady of the Lake, guardian of Excalibur. It is also said to be bottomless and to have a tunnel connecting it to the sea. Read More »

The Jamaica Inn, Bolventor

The Jamaica Inn is supposedly haunted by two different ghosts. A ghostly sailor is reputed to sit on a wall outside the Inn. The sightings have always been in the same location. The second ghost is that of a man wearing a tricorn hat and a long coat. The apparition was seen by a pair of eye witnesses in 1970 whilst staying overnight in the inn. Read More »

St Ives Bay

A ghost ship seen off the coast, has been identified with the ship Neptune. Also a ghostly lantern light is said to haunt the shore. It is supposed to be the lantern of a woman who was shipwrecked here and lost her baby to the waves. She is constantly searching for her child. Read More »

Veryan

Five circular thatched houses, within the village are supposed to have been designed to ensure that the Devil cannot hide in any corners. Each house is topped with a cross, a further deterrent to the Devil. In actuality they were built by the Reverend Jeremiah Trist for his daughters. The houses are now in private ownership. Read More »

Rillaton Mound

A legend associated with this mound was reflected by archaeological findings during excavation. A druid priest was said to haunt the mound, he would offer travellers a drink from a golden cup filled with a magical brew, which could not be drained. Read More »

Dando and The Wild Hunt

There are many tales to explain the origin of the spectral wild hunt, this one is from the Parish of St Germans in Cornwall. It explains how a priest with low morals became a demon huntsman.

In the medieval period the priest of the parish of St Germans was called Dando. Dando was not a figure of priestly virtue but abused his powers to enjoy earthly delights. Read More »

Truro

In a field on the outskirts of the town, chain rattling spectres have been heard on the site of the town's gibbet. Gibbets were often places associated with hauntings in the past, especially black dogs, which were seen as the spirits of the hanged. Read More »

Merry Maidens

Standing stones known as the Merry Maidens, lie Southeast of St Buryan, and are thought to date back to the Bronze Age. The circle consists of regular spaced granite stones, most under four feet in height. Read More »

Carn Gluze Long Barrow

Carn Gluze Long Barrow is a developed site that has seen burials over a long period of time. Early in the history of the barrow a deep shaft was built in the centre of the monument with steps leading down into it, its purpose is unclear although theories of ritual usage have been expounded. Read More »

Dolphin Inn, Penzance

The Dolphin Inn in Penzance has a long and interesting history, reputedly including amongst its visitors Sir Walter Raleigh and Judge Jeffries .

Judge Jeffries the notorious "Hanging Judge" is said to have held court in the dinning room, after the Duke of Monmouth's rebellion. Read More »

Castle Dore and the Tristan Stone

Castle Dore is an Iron age hillfort dating from around 200BC.  It was possibly home to Cunomonus a local king who had a son called Drustanus. The castle is also associated with the legend of Tristan and Isolde. Read More »

Men-an Tol

Men-an Tol

Men-an-Tol, consist of a holed stone (with the largest hole of any British holed stone) between two upright stones, with other fallen stones nearby. The holed stone is considered to be the remains of an entrance to a chambered tomb. The whole structure having been covered with a mound of earth. As with many of these cromlechs it is difficult to image a mound covering them at any time. Read More »

Lanyon Quoit

Lanyon Quoit

Also known as The Giants Table, Lanyon Quoit is a Neolithic burial mound dating back to 2500BC. The chambered tomb is made up of three upright granite blocks and a capstone, the covering mound has long since weathered away. Read More »

Carn Euny

Carn Euny Exterior

The remains of this Iron Age village dating from around 200BC, houses a 66-foot long fogou. A fogou is an underground passage, completed in stone and covered with earth. They date from the Iron Age period to the Roman occupation.

There is some speculation as to their purpose. Whether they are storage facilities, safe havens from attackers or channels for earth currents is debatable. Read More »

The Hurlers

The Hurlers Stone Circles

The Hurlers are three stone circles situated on moorland to the Northwest of Minions. The circles are aligned Southwest to Northeast and consist of low granite blocks of varying shapes and sizes. They date back to the Bronze Age period. According to legend they are reputed to be the petrified remains of men who were hurling on the Sabbath. Read More »

St Michael's Mount

St Michaels Mount 1

St Michael's Mount is a picturesque rocky island that has been described as the 'Jewel in Cornwall's crown' - perhaps a reason for its popularity with visitors. Read More »

Porthcurno Cove

A phantom sailing ship is said to sail into the cove and over the beach.

Directions: Porthcurno is reached from a minor road off the B3315.

St Levan's Church

It is said that the sound of a bell issues from a particular grave in the churchyard, when someone who is destined to die soon passes over it.

The church yard also contains a stone said to have been split open by St Levan. According to tradition if the gap becomes wide enough for a horse and cart to pass through it, it will signal the end of the world. Read More »

Trethevy Quoit or King Arthur's Quoit

Trevethy Quoit

Trevethy Quoit, also known as King Arthur's Quoit, is one of the more impressive burial chambers in Cornwall. Standing at over 15 feet 4.6 Metres. This cromlech dates from the Bronze Age period. The capstone is pierced by a hole, the purpose of which is unknown. Read More »

Deadmans' Cove

The cove is said to be haunted by a figure in dark clothing. It is difficult to ascertain whether this is connected in any way to the name of the place, but there was a sighting of the figure in the 1970s.

Directions: The cove can be reached off the B3301, on the Cornwall coastal path.

St Nectan's Glen

St Nectan's Glen, classical labyrinth

This beautiful glen is home to two rock cut labyrinths of classical (Cretan) design next to a watermill in rocky valley. Each carving is about 12 inches across its face.

There is some conjecture about their origin. They may date from the Bronze Age or Iron Age period, but are more likely to be the work of a local miller in the eighteenth century. Read More »



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