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Men-an Tol

Men-an Tol

Men-an-Tol, consist of a holed stone (with the largest hole of any British holed stone) between two upright stones, with other fallen stones nearby. The holed stone is considered to be the remains of an entrance to a chambered tomb. The whole structure having been covered with a mound of earth. As with many of these cromlechs it is difficult to image a mound covering them at any time. Read More »

Lanyon Quoit

Lanyon Quoit

Also known as The Giants Table, Lanyon Quoit is a Neolithic burial mound dating back to 2500BC. The chambered tomb is made up of three upright granite blocks and a capstone, the covering mound has long since weathered away. Read More »

Carn Euny

Carn Euny Exterior

The remains of this Iron Age village dating from around 200BC, houses a 66-foot long fogou. A fogou is an underground passage, completed in stone and covered with earth. They date from the Iron Age period to the Roman occupation.

There is some speculation as to their purpose. Whether they are storage facilities, safe havens from attackers or channels for earth currents is debatable. Read More »

The Hurlers

The Hurlers Stone Circles

The Hurlers are three stone circles situated on moorland to the Northwest of Minions. The circles are aligned Southwest to Northeast and consist of low granite blocks of varying shapes and sizes. They date back to the Bronze Age period. According to legend they are reputed to be the petrified remains of men who were hurling on the Sabbath. Read More »

St Michael's Mount

St Michaels Mount 1

St Michael's Mount is a picturesque rocky island that has been described as the 'Jewel in Cornwall's crown' - perhaps a reason for its popularity with visitors. Read More »

Porthcurno Cove

A phantom sailing ship is said to sail into the cove and over the beach.

Directions: Porthcurno is reached from a minor road off the B3315.

St Levan's Church

It is said that the sound of a bell issues from a particular grave in the churchyard, when someone who is destined to die soon passes over it.

The church yard also contains a stone said to have been split open by St Levan. According to tradition if the gap becomes wide enough for a horse and cart to pass through it, it will signal the end of the world. Read More »

Trethevy Quoit or King Arthur's Quoit

Trevethy Quoit

Trevethy Quoit, also known as King Arthur's Quoit, is one of the more impressive burial chambers in Cornwall. Standing at over 15 feet 4.6 Metres. This cromlech dates from the Bronze Age period. The capstone is pierced by a hole, the purpose of which is unknown. Read More »

Deadmans' Cove

The cove is said to be haunted by a figure in dark clothing. It is difficult to ascertain whether this is connected in any way to the name of the place, but there was a sighting of the figure in the 1970s.

Directions: The cove can be reached off the B3301, on the Cornwall coastal path.

St Nectan's Glen

St Nectan's Glen, classical labyrinth

This beautiful glen is home to two rock cut labyrinths of classical (Cretan) design next to a watermill in rocky valley. Each carving is about 12 inches across its face.

There is some conjecture about their origin. They may date from the Bronze Age or Iron Age period, but are more likely to be the work of a local miller in the eighteenth century. Read More »

Forraburry

There is a tradition at Forrabury, that the sound of ghostly bells can be heard coming from the waves, especially on stormy nights.

It is said that many years ago new bells were being transported over sea for the local church. The captain of the boat used profane language, at which a violent storm broke out and the ship was lost with all hands. Read More »

Chapel Porth

The giant Bolster is said to have terrorised the area until he fell in love with St Agnes. She asked him to prove his love to her by filling a hole in the cliffs at Chapel Porth with his blood.

This was deemed an easy task by the giant but the hole led to the sea, and the giant duly poured his lifeblood into the hole and died of blood loss. Read More »

Madron Holy Well

One of the most widely known wells in Cornwall, Madron Holy Well is still used, and has been the scene of some miraculous cures in the past. About 100 metres away are the remains of the Madron Well Chapel.

Rags and other objects are left to rot away in the hope of cures, and as votive offerings.

Directions: Northwest of Madron from a footpath Read More »

St Keyne

St Keyne

The holy well in the village is connected with a 5th century virgin called St Keyne who performed miracles.

Penhale

The buried town of Langarroc; Legend has it that seven churches stood on land now covered by sand dunes. The town was buried in a violent storm, sent to punish the people for their wicked ways.

Ancient human skeletons have been found in the area, adding substance that there was a settlement here in the distant past. Read More »

Willy Wilcock's Hole

Willy Wilcock's Hole is a cave said to be haunted by a fisherman of the same name who was transported to the fairy kingdom. He is still searching his way home after all this time. On wild nights his cries can be heard mingling in the wind.

St Neot Holy Well

The holy well at St Neot was once said to be the home of two holy fishes.

There is a story attached to these fish, it is said that one of the local priests had a vision, in which an angel told him that if he took one fish from the well every day to eat, there would always be a replacement the next day. Read More »

Altarnun Holy Well

A holy well can be found at Altarnun dedicated to Saint Non (also known as Nonna or Nonnita), along with a nearby church. As with many ancient wells, this one is reputed to have healing properties, this time madness.

Chun Quoit

Chun Quoit: by Daniel ParkinsonChun Quoit: by Daniel Parkinson

Chun Quoit is one of the most recognisable of the Bronze Age burial cairns in the Penwith area.

Directions: On a footpath from a minor road off the B3306.

King Doniert's Stone

King Doniert's Stone

Two granite slabs carved with latin inscriptions and intricate patterns, lie near the edge of Bodmin Moor.The stones are the remains of crosses, and are associated with King Doniert (Durngarth) of Cornwall who drowned in AD 875 in the river Fowey. Read More »

Zennor Church

Zennor Mermaid

Zennor Church is the home of the Zennor Mermaid, depicted in carvings in Zennor Church. According to legend, Mathew Trewella was a squire's son who was a gifted singer. One day he was singing by the shore so sweetly that a mermaid was compelled out of the water. Mathew succumbed to her otherworldly charms and was lost forever. Read More »

Bodmin

Bodmin means the house of the monks, and this was an ecclesiastical town until the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII.

The original monastery dedicated to St Petroc was founded in the 6th Century. St Petroc's bones are believed to be kept in an ivory casket in the crypt of St Petroc's Church. Read More »

Carn Brea

Carn Brea was occupied from 3,900BC, and was protected from attack by stone ramparts. Archaeological evidence shows the settlement was attacked and burned down at some point in its history. Hoards of Celtic coins have also been found on the hill during excavation. Read More »

The Piskies of Cornwall

Cornish Piskie

There are a number of creatures particular to Cornish folklore, although their cousins can be found elsewhere in Britain under a different name and guise. One of these strains is the Piskie also known as a Pixie in other West Country counties.

The Piskie is a general name for a fairy race or tribe in Cornwall. Read More »

The Knockers

In many old established mining areas throughout the world, there was a
long tradition of mine spirits, in Cornwall these were known as the
Knockers. They frequented the tin mines that formed much of local
economy in 18th and 19th century Cornwall. Knockers was not the only
name given to mine spirits others being Knackers, Buccas, and Spriggans Read More »



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