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Chun Quoit

Chun Quoit: by Daniel ParkinsonChun Quoit: by Daniel Parkinson

Chun Quoit is one of the most recognisable of the Bronze Age burial cairns in the Penwith area.

Directions: On a footpath from a minor road off the B3306.

King Doniert's Stone

King Doniert's Stone

Two granite slabs carved with latin inscriptions and intricate patterns, lie near the edge of Bodmin Moor.The stones are the remains of crosses, and are associated with King Doniert (Durngarth) of Cornwall who drowned in AD 875 in the river Fowey. Read More »

Zennor Church

Zennor Mermaid

Zennor Church is the home of the Zennor Mermaid, depicted in carvings in Zennor Church. According to legend, Mathew Trewella was a squire's son who was a gifted singer. One day he was singing by the shore so sweetly that a mermaid was compelled out of the water. Mathew succumbed to her otherworldly charms and was lost forever. Read More »

Bodmin

Bodmin means the house of the monks, and this was an ecclesiastical town until the dissolution of the monasteries by Henry VIII.

The original monastery dedicated to St Petroc was founded in the 6th Century. St Petroc's bones are believed to be kept in an ivory casket in the crypt of St Petroc's Church. Read More »

Carn Brea

Carn Brea was occupied from 3,900BC, and was protected from attack by stone ramparts. Archaeological evidence shows the settlement was attacked and burned down at some point in its history. Hoards of Celtic coins have also been found on the hill during excavation. Read More »

The Piskies of Cornwall

Cornish Piskie

There are a number of creatures particular to Cornish folklore, although their cousins can be found elsewhere in Britain under a different name and guise. One of these strains is the Piskie also known as a Pixie in other West Country counties.

The Piskie is a general name for a fairy race or tribe in Cornwall. Read More »

The Knockers

In many old established mining areas throughout the world, there was a
long tradition of mine spirits, in Cornwall these were known as the
Knockers. They frequented the tin mines that formed much of local
economy in 18th and 19th century Cornwall. Knockers was not the only
name given to mine spirits others being Knackers, Buccas, and Spriggans Read More »

The Spriggans

Armed Spriggan

Spriggans is the name given to a family of fairies in Cornish folklore, they are the closely related to the Piskies, but were generally believed to be darker and more dangerous than their mischievous cousins. Whereas Piskies are generally described as being cheerful and fun loving, Spriggans are more spiteful and full of malice, directed at humans in the form of evil tricks. Read More »

Alfred Street, Redcar

At 2.00 am, one morning in 1963, Mrs Pamela Iredale, her brother Barry Gardner and her nine-month baby fled their terraced house in Alfred Street, Redcar.

Mrs Iredale said, quote: "I just couldn't stand it any longer.. I didn't believe in ghosts, but I wouldn't spend another night in that house for a fortune. Read More »

The Wizard of Alderley Edge

Alderley Edge may have been a sacred site for many thousands of years; the area is steeped in folklore and legend. King Arthur and his men are said to sleep somewhere beneath the sandstone cliffs, and the area is associated with the wizard Merlin. Read More »

Lyme Park

Lyme Park is haunted by a phantom funeral procession with a weeping white clad woman who walks some distance behind. Read More »

George and Dragon Hotel, Chester

The Inn is said to be haunted by the ghost of a Roman Centurion, and the sound of marching feet. The marching sound can be heard going the length of the first floor which is split into about 14 rooms. The walls don't seem to impede the foot steps.

The hotel could be built on the site of a Roman cemetery in what was the old Roman city.

Cloud Hill

A giant is said to have dropped his shoe on the summit of the hill, he was startled by a small animal and fled leaving his shoe behind. The shoe turned to stone over the years and now resembles a huge boulder with a hollowed out face.

Also on the summit of Cloud Hill is a stone outcrop known as the drummer's knob. Read More »

The Bridestones

This Long Barrow standing on Congleton Edge, is thought to date from around 3000BC during the Mid Neolithic period. The barrow is aligned East to West and contains a chamber in the Eastern end. Excavated during the 18th century much of the covering mound was destroyed along with 2 other chambers. Read More »

Alderley Edge

Alderley Edge Carving

Alderley Edge has been a sacred site for many thousands of years and has many legends attached to it. King Arthur and his men are said to sleep somewhere beneath the sandstone cliffs. Read More »

Runcorn UFO (1957)

James Cook reported that he had spent two days on a UFO that he climbed on board on a hill outside Runcorn in Cheshire on 7th September 1957.

The Tower of London

Tower of London

The first structure on the site was a motte-and-bailey castle, which was started not long after William the Conqueror became king in 1066, the castle was built on the old Roman walls, which once formed the corner of Londinium. The first stone building on the site was the White Tower, which was commissioned by William the Conqueror in 1078 and completed in 1097. Read More »

The New Inn, St Neots

The New was originally an old coaching inn, and is reputedly haunted by Henry Rich, 1st Earl of Holland (1950 - 9th March 1649). Read More »

Sawston Hall

This Tudor mansion was in the hands of the Huddleston Family from the 16th century right up until the 1970's. Read More »

Madingley Hall

This Tudor mansion was built by John Hynde in 1543 and is said to have numerous secret passages. Many houses from this period have passages and secret priest holes especially if they were owned by Catholic families when England was ruled by Protestants.

The hall is said to be haunted by the ghost of Lady Ursula Hynde, who was the wife of John, the builder of the house. Read More »

Caxton Gibbet

The Caxton Gibbet stands on a small knoll between Cambridge and St Neots. Not far away is the pub of the same name, which has been haunted in the past by phantom footsteps.

According to a local story one of the early landlords intended to rob three wealthy travellers who were staying at the inn. Read More »

Woodcroft Castle

The castle is haunted by the clash of steel and cries for mercy, said to originate from a civil war skirmish.

During the English civil war the castle provided a guerrilla base for Dr Michael Hudson, who organised a band of men to cause havoc with Cromwell's troops in the area. Eventually Cromwell's troops caught up with him and all his men were killed in a vicious battle. Read More »

Heydon Ditch

The Heydon Ditch is a large earthwork that runs from Heydon to Fowlmere and has been dated to Saxon times, although it may have earlier origins. Read More »

The George and Dragon Hotel, West Wycombe

A White Lady haunts this 18th century hotel. She is said to be a servant girl who was killed by spurned lovers at nearby West Wycombe caves (later associated with the Hell Fire Club).

The pub is also said to be haunted by phantom footsteps.

The Hellfire Club

Medmenham Abbey

"Hellfire Club" is a name that brings in mind a coven of hooded and caped Enlightment-era gentlemen practising all kinds of debauchery, Satan worship being the most prominent. Read More »



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