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Gill House, Aspatria

During World War II Gill House was used as a dormitory for the Woman's Land Army, during this time a great deal of strange phenomena occurred, which led to an investigation by the Canon of Carlisle the Late W. J. Phythian Adams. Read More »

Workington Hall

Workington Hall

The ruined hall was once a magnificent fortified home belonging to the powerful Curwen family. It is said to be haunted by ghostly children and the Jacobite 'Galloping Harry Curwen' (Henry Curwen circa 1715). Read More »

Long Meg and Her Daughters

Long Meg Portrait

A weight of awe, not easy to be bourne,
Fell suddenly upon my spirit - cast
From the dread bosom of the unknown past
When first I saw that family forlorn..
Read More »

Swinside Stone Circle

Swinside Stone Circle

A beautiful solitary stone circle, the stones are said to be uncountable, there is also a legend which suggests a church buried beneath the stones. It is sometimes referred to as the Sunkenkirk for this very reason. The circle is also referred to as the 'grey cobbles'. Read More »

The Phantom Of Croglin Grange

Croglin Vampire

The phantom of Croglin Grange is one of the best known vampire stories in Britain. It is as famous in the annals of vampire lore as Whitby and its Dracula associations. The actual story bears the marks of fiction and first appeared in a book called 'In My Solitary life' by Augustus Hare. What follows is an adapted and shortened version of his story. Read More »

The Coniston UFO

On the 15 February 1954 Stephen Derbyshire, then 14, saw and photographed a UFO on the slopes of the Old Man of Coniston, above Coniston Village. The picture was blurred but the case became a classic of UFO literature of the time. Read More »

Pendragon Castle

Pendragon Castle

Pendragon Castle is associated with an Arthurian legend. It is said that Arthur's father, Uther Pendragon tried to re-route the river Eden to create a moat for the castle.

The ruin dates to the 1100's and was built by Hugh de Morville one of the knights who killed Thomas of Cantebury, so is out of the time scale for King Arthur. Read More »

Birdoswald Roman Fort

Birdoswald Roman Fort

This impressive site is the remains of a Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall. The area was occupied from much earlier times and recently a Neolithic burial has been found. There is also evidence of a large Dark Age Hall on the site. Traditionally the site has been identified with Camlan, the site of King Arthur's last battle. Read More »

Dunmail Raise

Dunmail Raise was the scene of a bloody battle for control of the lands of Cumbria. The battle took place against King Dunmail, the last King of Cumbria, against the united forces of Malcolm, the King of Scotland and Edmund, a Saxon King. Dunmail was defeated and slain and his sons were mutilated, his men were made to build a stone cairn over the spot where he fell. Read More »

The Devil's Bridge, Kirkby Lonsdale

Devil's Bridge over the river Lune, is associated with a legend that can be found throughout Britain, with minor variations from region to region. A woman who was separated from her cow by the river made a pact with the Devil. He would build a bridge across the river, in return for the soul of the first living thing to cross the bridge. Read More »

Hardknott Roman Fort (Mediobogdvm)

The Roman Fort of Mediobogdvm, above Hardknott Pass, is said to hold a fairy rath where King Eveling holds his court. Hardnott Pass can be found at the end of the Eskdale Valley and is also one of the steepest roads in Cumbria.

Elva Hill

Elva Hill

Elva Hill is known as a fairy hill and the name may be derived from an old Viking name meaning place of the elves. A stone circle on its slope suggests ancient ritual use of the area, only 15 stones of the original 30 remain. The circle is on private land belonging to Elva Farm, but there is a nearby footpath. The site is thought to date from Neolithic times. Read More »

Castle Howe

The site of a fairy home on the banks of Bassenthwaite Lake.

The Beetham Fairy Steps

The fairy steps, West of the church are steps cut into the limestone rock. If you can climb them without touching either side you will be granted a wish by the fairies.

Directions: Reached from a footpath through woodland to the South West of Beetham and South East of Storth.

Gosforth Hall Hotel

Room 11 of this old building dating back to 1658 is reputedly haunted by a figure some have described as resembling a friar. He sits by the entrance to the 'priests hole' which leads from this room to the bar fireplace in the bar below. Pewtar tankards have also been known to fly across the bar after unhooking themselves and an old man is supposed to glide through the bar. Read More »

Irton Cross and Church

Irton Cross

There are two Celtic Crosses in Irton Churchyard, one is truly ancient and the other is a copy of the former incorporated into more modern grave. The ancient cross is thought to date from the early ninth century, before the Norsemen invaded the area. Read More »

Gosforth Chapel

Gosforth Cross

This must have been an important place of worship to the Norse invaders, and to later generations judging by the wealth of important early Christian relics here. The actual church has been renovated several times and much of the older structure has been destroyed. Read More »

Burgh Marsh

The Solway Photograph

24th May 1964, Jim Templeton (then 44) on an outing with his wife and two daughters, took a picture of his daughter holding a posy of wild flowers near a stretch of marshland by the Solway Firth. When this was developed it showed what appeared to be a white-suited entity wearing a black visor standing behind his daughter in a strange perspective. Read More »

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle

Castlerigg Stone Circle is one of the finest in Cumbria, it is spectacularly situated within a panorama of rugged hills of ever changing character, depending on the mercurial Lakeland weather. Read More »

Wasdale Corpse Road

As Wasdale had no church early in its history, the deceased had to be carried over the fells to Eskdale for internment, and this route became known as the corpse road. This is haunted by the ghost of a horse carrying the body of woman tied to it. Read More »

The Stainton Ghost

The Cumberland News, 30/06/1999 had an article by Ruth Berry and Gill Hands about the Stainton Ghost. According to the story, a church or abbey once stood near the village and human bones were found among the ruins. During the reformation the land upon which this holy building stood fell into the hands of a certain baron, now nameless. Read More »

The Spital Inn And The Hand of Glory

A Hand of Glory was used by a gang of thieves in an attempt to rob the long gone Spital Inn, North Stainmore in 1797. Read More »

The Renwick Cockatrice

Cockatrice

In 1733 a cockatrice terrorized Renwick when the church was being demolished. The beast was slayen by John Tallantire with a rowan branch. The creature was described as resembling a bat. Apparently the cockatrice was again reported as having been seen in 1959. Read More »

Armboth House

Armboth House was haunted following the drowning of the households daughter on the night before her wedding day. It is said that bells could be heard, a ghostly dog could be seen swimming in Thirlmere Lake (where she was murdered) and reception meal places laid out by some spirit, all taking place on the anniversary of that fateful night, which just happens to be Halloween. Read More »

Calgarth Hall

According to legend, the owners, a Mr and Mrs Kraster Cook were framed one Christmas by Myles Phillipson, a magistrate. He planted a silver cup upon their persons when they came around to visit him. The crime was punishable by death and Phillipson gained control of Calgarth Hall, a sixteenth century manor house, but not before being cursed by Mrs Dorothy Cook. Read More »



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