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Wilden and Ravensden

On a minor road between Wilden and Ravensden a strange figure dressed in black has been seen in broad daylight.

The figure has been identified as a witch with a malevolent character.

Directions: The haunted road is a minor road off the B660 between Ravensden and Wilden

Odell

Five black marks on the front porch of the church are said to have been left by the devil, who attacked the church trying to get Sir Roland Alstons. Sir Roland is said to have sold his immortal soul to the Devil and was seeking sanctuary when the time to hand it over had arrived.

The ghost of Sir Roland is said to appear at the church riding a black mount every 100 years. Read More »

Marston Mortaine

The 14th century St Mary's church is unusual because it has a separate tower away from the main church. The tower was probably a means of refuge in Saxon times, either from flood or from attack. Read More »

Galley Hill

A hill called Galley Hill on the outskirts of Luton was in former times the site of a gallows, where public executions would have taken place. Read More »

Woburn Abbey

The abbey originally belonged to the Cistercians and was modernised in 1744, it has a multitude of ghost stories, many of them well authenticated.

Phantom monks have been seen in the Crypt area and in what is now the sculpture gallery. Read More »

Theatre Royal, Bath

Theatre Royal

The Theatre is haunted by a Grey Lady, she has been seen many times over the years by actors and actresses.  Legend suggests that she is the ghost of an actress who committed suicide in the Garricks Head next door, after a duel between her lover and her husband left her lover dead. Read More »

The Legend of Bladud

Bladud was the legendary founder of Bath and the sacred temple of Aqua Sullis. He is mentioned in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain and The Life of Merlin, written in the twelfth century. The source of the original legend is obscure. Read More »

Stoney Littleton Long Barrow

This early Neolithic Long Barrow was constructed around 3700BC. The forecourt is flanked by two projecting horns, which frame the entrance to the passageway. The actual passageway extends under the mound for 48 feet and has 3 chambers on either side of the passage and 1 end chamber. These were found to contain a mixed group of bones some of them burned, from a number of different burials. Read More »

Congresbury Church

The Yew trees in the church yard are said to be the relatives of an ancient tree which sprouted from a staff planted in the ground by St Congar. Yew trees grow very slowly and are often found in ancient churchyards. In many cases they are the descendants of ancient trees planted when the church was first built. The story may be a folk memory related to the original planting. Read More »

Stanton Drew Stone Circle

Stanton Drew(1)

The Neolithic ritual site of Stanton Drew consists of three stone circles and a group of stones referred to as 'The Cove'. The largest of the circles known as the Great Circle consists of 27 stones, most of which are recumbent (lying down) having fallen in the past. Read More »

Bath (Aqua Sullis)

Bath (Aqua Sullis)

The hot springs and the Roman bath house are a Celtic/Roman sacred place, dedicated to the Sullis and the goddess Minerva. In myth the sacred spring was discovered by King Bladud, who was cured of leprosy by the healing waters and mud. Read More »

Kfar Hawald Encounter 1996

On October 20, thirty three year old Eli Hawald, had a UFO encounter in the village of Kfar Hawald. According to Barry Chamish, journalist and Israel based UFO Investigator ‘The tiny village has no electricity and when Eli Hawald went outside at 11:00 PM, all was too clear for him. "Out of nowhere I saw a gigantic green light, the colour of a traffic light, fall out of the sky. Read More »

Sheep Road, Cirencester Big Cat Sighting (2006)

On 14 September 2006 the following article by Jenni Silver entitled ‘Bg cat sightings again in Cirencester’ appeared in the Wiltshire & Gloustershire Standard.

AN ELUSIVE big cat believed to be stalking the Cirencester area has been spotted again, just yards from where a similar creature was caught on CCTV cameras. Read More »

Manaton Dragon

A winged dragon made its lair in an old tin mine here. The dragon’s hissing was said to be audible for miles around. It was finally slain in the mine but history does not record by whom. The story was recorded by the late 18th century writer Polwhele. 

Holy Trinity Church, Coverham

Coverham Church

This church dates from the 13th century. Read More »

River Taff Worm

A worm type of dragon was supposed to live at the bottom of a whirlpool in the River Taff. It was said to drown people and suck down their bodies to eat.

The above was taken from an article by Richard Freeman.

Love

All thoughts, all passions, all delights,
Whatever stirs this mortal frame,
All are but ministers of Love,
And feed his sacred flame.
Oft in my waking dreams do I
Live o'er again that happy hour,
When midway on the mount I lay,
Beside the ruined tower.
The moonshine, stealing o'er the scene
Had blended with the lights of eve ; Read More »

Jabberwocky

Jabberwocky

From 'Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There' 1872

'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogoves,
And the mome raths outgrabe. Read More »

The Bamburgh Laidly

The Laidly (Northumbrian for loathsome) worm was once a beautiful princess named Margaret, who lived in Bamburgh Castle. Her stepmother was a witch who, due to jealousy, cast a spell changing the princess into a huge worm. The worm’s breath caused vegetation to shrivel, and it demanded the milk of seven cows every day. Read More »

Mordiford Wyvern

The story of the Mordiford wyvern is one of the most detailed dragon legends in Britain; it is also the one with the most variations, having no less than five. Read More »

Brent Pelham and Piers Shonks

‘A mighty dragon made its lair under the roots of an ancient yew tree and wrought havoc in the surrounding countryside. Piers Shonks, Lord of the Manor of Pelham, fought it accompanied by three huge hounds. He finally triumphed by thrusting a long spear down the dragon’s throat. Read More »

Knucker Of Lyminster

Lyminster has a dragon legend of which three different versions exist. The dragon was known as the Knucker and inhabited a supposedly bottomless pool known as the Knucker Hole and is situated just to the north of Lyminster. Read More »

Loch Maree

Until the middle of the 18th century bulls were sacrificed on August 25th (St Maerlrubha’s Day) to dragons that dwelt in the lake. These may have been akin to the creatures still reported in other Scottish Lochs to this day.

Taken from an article by Richard Freeman.

Dalry Dragon

The worm here was white in colour and this legend may have inspired Bram Stoker’s novel ‘Lair of the White Worm’. It wound itself around Mote Hill and got up to the usual tricks.   A local blacksmith made a suit of armour covered with retractable spikes. Read More »

Solway Firth Worm

According to legend a sea dwelling worm devoured fish stocks that the local people depended on. Not satisfied with seafood, it crawled ashore to eat farm animals and humans. People from the villages along the shore built a huge palisade of sharpened stakes and erected it at low tide. When the worm came in with the high tide it impaled itself on the spikes. Read More »



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