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ASSAP: The Association for the Scientific Study of Anomolous Phenomena

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The Association for the Scientific Study of Anomalous Phenomena (ASSAP) has been investigating the weird seriously (and the seriously weird) since 1981. Our main aims are paranormal research and education. Anomalous phenomena include psychic phenomena, UFOs, Forteana and earth mysteries. Read More »

Aughisky

Water Horses

These are the water horses of Ireland and are similar to the Each Uisge and Cabyll-Ushtey. They gallop out of the crashing waves up onto the shore, venturing inland. They are supposed to make excellent mounts for whoever can catch one but riding a Aughisky is not without risk. Read More »

Ballyheigue Castle

Designed by Richard Morrison in 1810, Ballyheigue Castle was a grand mansion and home of the Crosbie family. Now mostly a shell, surrounded by a golf course which opened in 1996. It ha been burned down twice, once by accident in 1840 and again on 27th May 1921 as part of the troubles and the destruction of buildings linked to British Imperialism. Read More »

Banshee

Banshee (Andy)

The Banshee is most commonly visualised as a female spirit who wails in the night to foretell disaster, either to an individual family or more generally. The tradition is the strongest in Ireland but many places with Celtic survivals have a variant of the Banshee. Read More »

Beast of Lettir Dallan

The Triads of Ireland or the Trecheng Breth Féne describe the Beast of Lettir Dallan as one of the three wonders of Glenn Dallan in Tirowen. Read More »

Ben Bulben

Ben Bulben

Legendary home of the Irish third century warriors known as the Fianna, Ben Bulben (or Benbulben, Benbulbin, Binn Ghulbain) is a large glacial rock formation in the Darty Mountains. Read More »

Changelings

Changelings are part of Western Folklore, a child of a fairy type (Elf, Troll etc) which has been secretly swapped for a human baby and left in its place. George Waldron gave the following description of one he saw in the Isle of Man and it was subsequently reprinted in ‘The Science of Fairy Tales’ (1891) by Edwin Sidney Hartland. Read More »

Cloera, Ireland/Gravesend, Kent/Bristol UFO (1211AD)

In 1211AD Gervase of Tilbury recorded a strange event in the borough of Clorea in Ireland. During a Sunday Mass at the church of St Kinarus in the borough of Cloera, an anchor was seen to descend from the sky and hook on to the church door. Read More »

Cornu

According to legend the Cornu was a great black bird, described as being like a wingless and featherless heron that occupied a cavern at the medieval pilgrimage site of St Patrick’s Purgatory, Saint’s Island, Read More »

The Dobhar-chu

The Dobhar-chu or water hound is a lake dwelling creature of Irish Folklore. It is covered in short white fur with a dark cross on it’s back and described as being like a dog or a large sea otter. Read More »

Dobhar-chú of Lough Mask

The following account of a Dobhar-chú in Lough Mask (Lake Mask) appeared in Roderic O’Flaherty’s (1629 – 1718) ‘A Description of West Connaught’ dated 1684 which was translated by James Hardiman in 1846. Read More »

Eo Rossa

The Eo Rossa or Eó Ruis (Yew of Ross) was one of the five sacred trees of Ireland (the Bile* Trees or the Bileda) and said to grow by the River Barrow at Leighlinbridge. It grew from three natured berries from a branch born by the Irish God, Trefuilngid Tre-ochair (Triple Bearer of the Triple Key, Master of All Wisdom and consort of Macha, the triple goddess). Read More »

Fachan

fachan

The Fachan (Fechan or Fachin or Peg Leg Jack) is a found in Scots-Irish Folklore. A Fachan's appearance is so terrible it was known to cause heart attacks. It has one eye, one leg, one withered arm coming out of it's chest and a mane of black feathers. Read More »

Fairy Nurse

There lived a woman in Innish Shark -- one of the group of islands on the eastern coast -- named Biddy Mannion, as handsome and likely a fisherman's wife as you would meet in a day's walk. She was tall, and fair in the face, with skin like an egg, and hair that might vie with the gloss of the raven's wing. Read More »

Gallarus Oratory

Gallarus Oratory Front

Ireland has a history of early Christian settlement dating as far back as the 6th century when monastic settlements were developed as bastions of the faith in the remote Irish countryside. Gallarus Oratory is the oldest and best preserved example of an early church that served one of these small settlements, and is probably one of the oldest intact buildings in Ireland. Read More »

The Hill of Tara

The Hill of Tara – ancient seat of the Kings of Ireland – is the focal point in a complex landscape of ancient monuments dating from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. It is a stirring setting where mythology and history fuse together, and has been revered as a holy site for thousands of years. Read More »

IRISH FOLKLORE COMMISSION 1935-1970 : History, Ideology, Methodology

Irish Folklore Commission

IRISH FOLKLORE COMMISSION 1935-1970 : History, Ideology, Methodology [Micheal Briody] Between 1935 and 1970 the Irish Folklore Commission (Coimisiún Béaloideasa Éireann), under-funded and at great personal cost to its staff, assembled one of the world's largest folklore collections. Read More »

Irish Ghosts by Peter Underwood

Irish Ghosts by Peter Underwood

Peter Underwood, a world renowned expert on the paranormal, has published a new book focussing on Irish Ghosts. I had great hopes for this book having owned a copy of his 1973 book Gazetteer of Scottish & Irish Ghosts for a number of years, and I'm pleased to say I've not being disappointed. Read More »

Jamie Freel and the Young Lady

The following story from' Fairy and Folk Tales of the Irish Peasantry' by William Butler Yeats (1888) takes place in Fannet, which is now known as Fanad, a peninsular by Lough Swilly. Although the tale includes a trip across the length of Ireland, according to the story the hero states he is nearly home when approaching Tamney, so I have used this village for my map reference below. Read More »

Lough Derg

Lough Derg is a 2200 acre lake in County Donegal, famous for St Patrick's Purgatory which is still a popular of pilgrimage as it has been many centuries. Read More »

Lough Dubh Lake Monster

Lough Dubh or Black’s Lake is a popular fishing venue by the river suck which was the scene of a possible monster sighting in the early 1960’s a creature was hooked by Mr Mullaney (a schoolmaster) and his son whilst out fishing. Described as having "short thick legs with small ears and a white pointed horn on the snout. Read More »

Malahide Castle

Malahide Castle

Malahide Castle dates from the 12th century and is reputedly haunted by five distinct ghosts. Sir Richard Talbot, Lord of Malahide founded Malahide Castle in 1185 after he had been granted the "lands and harbour of Malahide" from Henry II, after taking part in the Kings campaign in Ireland. The Talbot family remained in the castle until 1975. Read More »

Mansion House, Dublin

Built in 1710 by Joshua Dawson, the Mansion House has been the official residence of the Lord Mayor of Dublin since 1715. An by Kieran Dineen in The Irish Sun on 23rd May 2013 suggests the building is haunted. Read More »

Mullinakill Holy Well

Mullenakill is just one of several places that claim to be the birth place of St Moling. Read More »

Newgrange

Newgrange Entrance

If we were making a list of the top 100 ancient sites in Britain and Ireland (as is the current vogue) Newgrange would undoubtedly be in the hallowed top 10. Its great age, size, astronomical features and location in the beautiful Boyne Valley, mark it as one of the most important ‘mystery' sites in Europe. Read More »



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