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Bath (Aqua Sullis)

Bath (Aqua Sullis)

The hot springs and the Roman bath house are a Celtic/Roman sacred place, dedicated to the Sullis and the goddess Minerva. In myth the sacred spring was discovered by King Bladud, who was cured of leprosy by the healing waters and mud. Read More »

Bryn-y-Castell

Taking the B4391 towards Bala from Llan Ffestiniog for just over a mile, you pass close to an Iron Age hillfort situated in rough moorland known as Bryn-y-Castell. The site was excavated by students from Plas Tan-y-Bwlch (Maentwrog) between 1979 and 1985, and it was found to be an important site for iron production until the arrival of the Romans in North Wales when it was abandoned. Read More »

Caer Leb

Caer Leb is a rectangular shaped earthwork with double banks and ditches. It measures approximately two hundred feet by one hundred and sixty feet, so it is quite a large site. A 3rd Century brooch and a 4th Century denarius along with some Roman pottery and Iron Age quern stones have been found at Caer Leb. Read More »

Caer-y-Twr

Caer-y-Twr is the remains of an Iron Age hill fort on the summit of Holyhead mountain (Mynydd Twr) 220 metres in height. Due to its position, it did not need much additional defence, but it had a stone rampart on the northern and eastern sides enclosing an area of roughly seven hectares. The site of the hill fort now contains mostly rubble, but the walls can still be identified. Read More »

Caerleon Amphitheatre

Arthurs Round Table

This is the best example of a Roman amphitheatre in Britain. Until 1926 when serious excavations were undertaken at the site, it was considered to be a circular earthwork and linked to the legend of King Arthur being known as his Round Table. Read More »

Castell Bryn Gwyn

There is much speculation over the age and use of Castell Bryn Gwyn (White Hill Castle). It was not a hillfort, being built on flat land, but excavations in 1959-1960 discovered that the rampart and ditch were similar to hillfort defences. It may have been a Neolithic henge monument, but nevertheless, there has been a long history of occupation at the site. Read More »

Castell Tomen-y-Mur, (a.k.a. Mur-y-Castell and Heriri Mons)

Tomen-y-Mur

Tomen-y-Mur (translated as ‘Mound in the Walls’) was originally an ancient Roman fort on the slope of Mynydd Maentwrog to the north east of Llyn Trawsfynyedd, with access from A470 although it is not signposted. Read More »

Castleshaw Roman Camp (Rigodunum)

Castleshaw Roman Camp

The original fort dates to the Flavian period, and was probably erected during the governship of Agricola (AD77 to AD83), when new Roman roads were being constructed in the Pennines as an aid to Roman expansion in the North. The larger fort became a smaller fortlet in the Trajanic era. Read More »

Chanctonbury Ring

Chanctonbry Ring

Chanctonbury Ring is a hill on the Sussex Downs some 700 feet above sea level and, until the hurricane, which swept across Southern England, was crowned with beech trees. Excavations at the site showed that the ramparts dated from 300 BC. Remains of several Roman buildings were found during the early digs, along with various items and fragments of pottery. Read More »

Hardknott Roman Fort (Mediobogdvm)

The Roman Fort of Mediobogdvm, above Hardknott Pass, is said to hold a fairy rath where King Eveling holds his court. Hardnott Pass can be found at the end of the Eskdale Valley and is also one of the steepest roads in Cumbria.

Maiden Castle

Maiden Castle

This is the largest Iron Age Hillfort in Britain, consisting of a spectacular series of bank and ditch defences enclosing an area of 45 acres. These fortifications cover the much earlier site of a Middle Neolithic Causeway Camp from around 3000BC. The camp was enclosed by two lines of ditches, the remains of which are indistinguishable. Read More »

Mancunium Roman Fort, Castlefield

The remains of the Roman fort named Mancunium date from AD79 and can be found at Castlefield in Manchester. Read More »

Oldbury Castle and Cherhill White Horse

Cherhill White Horse

This hillfort that covers 9 hectares or 22 acres was occupied in Roman times, and it is said to be haunted by ghostly Roman soldiers. They have been seen on a road near to the camp. The camp itself sits upon a bronze age settlement and evidence of post Roman occupation has also been found. Read More »

Pen Llystyn Roman Fort

There used to be a Roman military settlement just north of where the old Roman road changes direction at Bryncir, (the now A487 was once the Roman military road between the forts at Caernarfon (Segontium) and Trawsfynyedd (Heriri Mons, a.k.a. Read More »

Reculver

Reculver

Reculver is a popular summer holiday resort on the north coat of Kent. It has two key sites of archaeological interest, the remains of a Roman fort and a ruined medieval church. Read More »

Richborough

Spectral Roman armies where seen marching into the sea during the World War II Watches. The area around Richborough was a Roman port during the occupation and the Roman Fort was very important strategically. Though the fort originally overlooked a port, it is now two miles from the sea.

Roman Steps

On a popular walking route for ramblers and hikers, from Cwm Bychan through Bwlch Tyddiad and around Rhinog Fawr, you will encounter the Roman Steps. These steps made in the hills are commonly said to have been constructed by the Romans to facilitate the ascent and descent of their sentries to and from the pass of Bwlch Tyddiad (1,294 ft and 7.5 miles out of Llanbedr). Read More »

Saint Cybi and Saint Cybi’s Church (Holyhead)

Saint Cybi was said to be the cousin of Saint David (~500- 1st March 589AD, there is uncertainty to the dates), the Patron Saint of Wales, and the friend of Saint Seiriol who founded his cell at Penmon on Ynys Môn (Anglesey) with whom he would regularly meet. Read More »

Segontium Roman Fort

Segontium Roman Fort

This is the remains of a Roman auxiliary fort, one of the largest, and last to be abandoned by the Romans in North Wales. It was built by Gnaeus Julius Agricola in around 77 AD after his victory over the native tribe, the Ordovices. Read More »

Sinnoden Hill

Sinnoden Hill

Sinnoden Hill standing next to Harp hill, was once a Roman Fort during the period of their occupation. Legend suggests that there is buried treasure on the hill, hidden in Roman times in an area called the money pit. Read More »

The Treasurer's House

The Treasurer's House was the seat of the treasurers of York Minister from the 12th century to 1546. The last treasurer - William Cliffe - resigned, after all the treasure was removed during the dissolution of the monasteries. The house was extensively rebuilt in the 17th century. Read More »

Virginia Water

In AD60 or 61AD the final battle between the Romans and the rebel Briton's led by Boudica (or Boudicca or Boadicea) was fought and is known as the Battle of Watling Street (or Battle of Paulerspury). No one actually knows where this battle described as being ‘being approached by a narrow defile with a wood at the back and a plain in the front ‘ by Tacitcus took place. Read More »

The Dolphin Hotel, Littlehampton

Ellie and Katie along with their staff have created a warm and friendly pub with a traditional feel and traditional values. They have worked hard to turn the Dolphin into one of the safest, cleanest and most welcoming pubs around. Between them they have nearly 30 years experience in the pub and catering trade. Read More »



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