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Loch Druich Mermaids

Selkies

There is a story connected to Loch Druich and three brothers who happened across a troupe of merfolk. One night the brothers were by the loch side when they saw a group of seals come up onto the beach and shred their furry skins. Beneath the skins were naked people, who danced together on the shore. Read More »

Loch Lomond Avro Lancaster (1965)

The following account was e-mailed in by one of our readers.  'I am a retired police officer, but before I joined the police I went on a camping holiday with my girl friend and another couple. This was in June1965. We had been driving some time and decided to stop to stretch our legs. Read More »

Loch Ma Naire

This loch has long been seen as a healing loch, according to legend the loch received its powers from a magical healing stone belonging to a wise woman. Read More »

Loch Maree

Until the middle of the 18th century bulls were sacrificed on August 25th (St Maerlrubha’s Day) to dragons that dwelt in the lake. These may have been akin to the creatures still reported in other Scottish Lochs to this day.

Taken from an article by Richard Freeman.

Loch Morar

It is surprising how many lochs in Inverneshire have monster traditions and sightings, Loch Ness, Loch Lhinne, Loch Lochy, and Loch Arkaig to name a few. Read More »

Loch na Beiste

In his 'Guide to Gairloch and Loch Maree' (1886), John H. Dixon gave the following account of a creature that was said to live in Loch na Beiste roughly 50 years early. 'The existence of water-kelpies in Gairloch, if perhaps not universally credited in the present generation, was accepted as undoubted in the last. Read More »

Loch Na Fideil

Loch Na Fideil was reputedly the home of a legendary female creature or spirit known as the Fideal after which the body of water is named (Loch of the Fideal). Depending upon which source you read, she attacks either men or women and children, dragging them down under the water in order to devour them. Read More »

Loch Ness

Urquart Castle

Loch Ness is famed in modern times as the supposed abode of a strange long necked monster, but the area is also rich in folklore, which Read More »

Loch Ness Water Horse

James Mackinlay in his Folklore of Scottish Lochs and Springs (1893) tells of another creature that was said to lurch in Loch Ness. 'A noted demon-steed once inhabited Loch Ness, and was a cause of terror to the inhabitants of the neighbourhood. Read More »

Loch Treig Water Horse

The freshwater Loch Treig (Loch of Death) has been a reservoir since 1929, however prior to this it had a reputation of being the home to some very dangerous Water Horses or Each Uisge. Read More »

Loch Urabhal

Loch Uravel or Urabhal in Gaelic is a small body of water roughly 2 miles north of Achmore. On 27 July 1961 two teachers fishing at the loch had a strange experience. Thirty five metres from their boat they reputedly saw a two headed, single humped creature swim by.

Lochmaben Castle

Dating from the 13th century, Lochmaben Castle, which is now a ruin, was built by King Edward I of England (Born 17 June 1239 – Died 7 July 1307) replacing the earlier 12th century Bruce motte and bailey castle. The de Brus or Bruce family, the Lords of Annandale, moved to Lochmaben following the ruination of Annan Castle. Read More »

Lochmaben Stane (Stone)

The Lochmaben Stane (or Lochmabenstane, Lochmabenstone, Clochmabenstane, Old Graitney Stone, Lowmabanstane, Loughmabanestane) stands in a farmers field near where the Kirtle Water enters the Solway Firth. Made if granite, it measures 7-8 feet in height and has a girth between 18 and 21 feet (depending upon your source). Read More »

Lochranza

Lochranza and Castle

Lochranza is situated at the Northern Tip of Arran, the loch contains a small island with a ruined castle, which was mentioned by Sir Walter Scott Read More »

Lordscairnie Castle

The castle has links with the legend of the more infamous Glamis Castle. Read More »

Loudon Castle

Now home to the Loudoun Castle Family Theme Park, there was a castle here from at least the 15th century, which was then converted into a mansion retaining the tower house. Read More »

Lukki Minnie

The following account of the tale of Lukki Minnie appeared in Malachy Tallack's blog on the New Stateman website (30 April 2007). 'For centuries – perhaps even for millennia, no-one is entirely sure – Shetland has been home to a very special creature. Read More »

Machrie Moor Stone Circles

Three of the tall sandstone pillars

The Isle of Arran, off the West Coast of Scotland, has many stone circles and standing stones dating from the Neolithic period and the early Bronze Age. The finest collection of circles can be found on Machrie Moor, on the West of the island. The whole moorland is littered with the remains of early man, from hut circles to chambered cairns and solitary standing stones. Read More »

Major Thomas Weir’s House

According to an article by Oliver Norton in the Daily Mail on 7 February 2014, part of the home of the occultist Thomas Weir still survives. Read More »

Mansfield Street, Glasgow

The following article entitled 'Ghost is no joke for the Hanlons' was published in the Glasgow Evening Times on 7 August 1961.

“We’ll never go near it again”

A shaken, sleepless man sat resting in his mother’s home to-day while six miles away a whole street argued furiously about the ghost he left behind him. Read More »

Marriott Dalmahoy Hotel & Country Club

The Dalmahoy Hotel, now part of the Marriott group is a Georgian Mansion dating from 1720 and it is reputedly haunted by the second daughter of the 8th Earl of Morton. The name Dalmahoy refers to the family that held the land from the start of the fourteenth century right up to it passing to the Dalrymples in the mid seventeenth century. Read More »

Mary King's Close

A close such as Mary King's Close is a narrow lane or passage that runs between two buildings or a route that would give access to the rear of a building. Read More »

Maryculter House Hotel

Maryculter House Hotel is situated on the site of a Knights Templar Manor and the ghost that reputedly haunts here may be related to these crusading knights. The land at Maryculter was given to the Templars in 1187 by the King of Scotland, which at that time would have been William the Lion (1165-1214). A further gift of land in the area was then made by Walter Bisset of Aboyne. Read More »

Marymass

3rd or 4th Monday in August - Once said to have been celebrated with hilltop fires, the festival is now associated with Mary Queen of Scots. A Queen is voted from the local Irvine girls and a parade goes through the town along with other events.

Medieval Heretics and the Green Man

There is a general acceptance that the Green Man is a representation of a pagan deity, but this is not borne out by the abundance of Green Man carvings to be found on or within Christian churches. Could this contradiction be the clue that will lead to our understanding of this archaic figure? Why do we find the Green Many associated with churches? Read More »



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