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Redemption From Fairy Land

NEAR the town of Aberdeen, in Scotland, lived James Campbell, who had one daughter, named Mary, who, was married to John Nelson, a young man of that neighbourhood. Read More »

Rerrick Poltergeist 1695

Not much now remains of the scene where this famous case took place, with just a single skeletal tree marking the location of the Ring Plantation at Ringcroft of Stocking where in 1695 the home of Andrew Mackie in the parish of Rerrick was reputedly haunted by a poltergeist and this caused a stir in Scotland after the case was published in a pamphlet by the local minister. Read More »

Robert Burns and Folklore

Robert Burns

Robert Burns was born on the 25th January 1759 during the ‘Age of Enlightenment’ but also in a time when the country superstitions and supernatural beings were an integral part of folk belief. The landscape of Burns’ was one where the natural rhythms of nature were much more intertwined in the day to day of working life. Read More »

Rockhall Tower House

The tower house, now a hotel, is an altered 17th century tower-house built by Sir William Grierson. The tower-house reputed to be haunted by the spectre of a whistle-blowing monkey, the spirit of Sir Robert Grierson's pet, which was killed by servants after his death. Read More »

Rosslyn Chapel & Roslin Castle

Rosslyn Chapel

Rosslyn Chapel is touted as being one of the most mysterious places in Scotland, especially with the current gloat of books purporting to show how hidden secrets lurk within every crack of stone at this venerated place. Anybody who has ever visited the chapel may feel that it deserves its current status, and I must confess the atmosphere even on a busy day is something to be experienced. Read More »

Ruthven Barracks

Ruthven Barracks 2

The castle that once stood on the site of the barracks, was said to be haunted by its notorious lord, who was trapped in limbo playing cards with the Devil.

Ruthven was first used as a Barracks in 1689. It was taken by force twice; once when the garrison surrendered to Bonnie Dundee, the other time being in 1746 when it was overrun by Jacobite troops. Read More »

Ruthwell Cross

The cross is thought to date back to the late seventh century, an early period in the development of Christianity in the area, which spread here from Northumberland. It has been recognised as one of the most important early Christian crosses in Britain. Read More »

Sandwood Bay

Sandwood Bay is one of the most northerly sandy beaches in Scotland, and would be well worth a visit without the added interest of the strange phenomena that has happened here. Read More »

Sanquhar Castle

Sanquhar castle is now a gaunt ruin visible from the West Coast main line from Scotland to England. The castle was constructed in the 13th century and belonged to the Crichton family from the 14th century, eventually being abandoned to the elements in the late 17th century. Read More »

Sanquhar Churchyard

According to local lore the ghost of Abraham Crichton, who died in 1745, haunts the Sanquhar churchyard despite an exorcism by a minister. Read More »

Santraigh

THERE was a herd's wife in the island of Sanntraigh, and she had a kettle. A woman of peace would come every day to seek the kettle. She would not say a word when she came, but she would catch hold of the kettle. When she would catch the kettle, the woman of the house would say--

"A smith is able to make
Cold iron hot with coal.
The due of a kettle is bones, Read More »

Santraigh

THERE was a herd's wife in the island of Sanntraigh, and she had a kettle. A woman of peace would come every day to seek the kettle. She would not say a word when she came, but she would catch hold of the kettle. When she would catch the kettle, the woman of the house would say--

"A smith is able to make
Cold iron hot with coal. Read More »

The Legend of Sawney Bean

Sawney Bean at cave

The story of Sawney Bean is one of the most gruesome Scottish legends, the plot of which would not look out of place in any modern horror/slasher movie. Evidence suggests the tale dates to the early 18th century. Read More »

Schiehallion

The dark brooding presence of Schiehallion (pronounced She-hal-e-on)- the fairy hill of the Caledonians - looms over the Eastern end of Rannoch moor like a voluminous guardian. The mountain is one of the traditional haunts of otherworld beings. Read More »

Searrach Uisge

The creature, possibly a water horse of Loch Suainbhal is referred to as the Searrach Uisge. The creature was said to inhabit the loch for over a century and in the nineteenth century it was described as being like an capsized boat when it was seen swimming around. Another description has it being forty foot long and eel like. Read More »

Silkies

Selkies

Silkies are shape shifting sea fairies usually in the form of bright-eyed seals. They are localised to Northern Scotland and the Shetland Islands.

Silkies often came on to land in human form, where they would dance, especially on the night of the full moon. Read More »

Site of The King's Arms Hotel

The Kings Arm Hotel 1945

The King's Arms Hotel, which was demolished in 1973, was reputed to be haunted by a woman in her early twenties. Traditionally she was the widow of Captain Robert Stewart, who died during the French revolution. She pined away after his death and died of heartbreak at the age of 24. Read More »

Smoo Cave

Smoo Cave is a limestone cavern consisting of three chambers, a burn enters the second chamber through a hole in the roof falling for a distance of 80 feet. Read More »

Solway Firth Worm

According to legend a sea dwelling worm devoured fish stocks that the local people depended on. Not satisfied with seafood, it crawled ashore to eat farm animals and humans. People from the villages along the shore built a huge palisade of sharpened stakes and erected it at low tide. When the worm came in with the high tide it impaled itself on the spikes. Read More »

Spedlins Tower

The tower dates from the 15th century, became ruinous in the 19th century, and was later restored in the 1960's to its present state. The tower was the occupied by the Jardine family until they moved to a nearby mansion. Read More »

Springkell House

Dating from 1734, Springkell House was built by the Maxwell family, Barons of Kirkconnel and Springkell since 1609. The mansion passed into the hands of the Johnson-Ferguson family in 1894 when Springkell was sold to Sir Jabez Edward Johnson-Ferguson (Born 27 November 1849 – Died 10 December 1929), Director of the Bolckow Vaughan mining company and Member of Parliament for Loughborough. Read More »

Spynie Palace

Spynie Palace

Spynie Palace was the seat of the bishops of Moray for over 500 years; the atmospheric ruins now a shell of its former glory. The Palace - like many old historical buildings - has its share of traditions and ghost stories. Read More »

St Andrews Cathedral

Kilrimont changed its name to St Andrews when relics of the saint were brought here by Bishop Acca of Hexam in 732AD, although there is a folklore tradition that suggests the relics found there way to Read More »

St Anthony's Well, Edinburgh

Prior to 1674 St Anthony’s Well flowed from beneath a small stone arch in a slightly higher position to the bolder from under which it now sprouts. It was probably connected to the nearby 15th century St Anthony’s Chapel which is now a ruin. Read More »

St Clements Church , Rodel

St Clements Church

This gloomy atmospheric church, dating from the sixteenth century, is dedicated to St Clement, who was a bishop of Dunblane parish. Read More »



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