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Loch Awe

Loch Awe is Scotlands third largest fresh water loch at with a length of 35km and total surface area of 14.9 miles. It shares a common legend about its creation which concerns a well that flooded. Read More »

Loch Lomond Avro Lancaster (1965)

The following account was e-mailed in by one of our readers.  'I am a retired police officer, but before I joined the police I went on a camping holiday with my girl friend and another couple. This was in June1965. We had been driving some time and decided to stop to stretch our legs. Read More »

Lochranza

Lochranza and Castle

Lochranza is situated at the Northern Tip of Arran, the loch contains a small island with a ruined castle, which was mentioned by Sir Walter Scott Read More »

Loudon Castle

Now home to the Loudoun Castle Family Theme Park, there was a castle here from at least the 15th century, which was then converted into a mansion retaining the tower house. Read More »

Machrie Moor Stone Circles

Three of the tall sandstone pillars

The Isle of Arran, off the West Coast of Scotland, has many stone circles and standing stones dating from the Neolithic period and the early Bronze Age. The finest collection of circles can be found on Machrie Moor, on the West of the island. The whole moorland is littered with the remains of early man, from hut circles to chambered cairns and solitary standing stones. Read More »

Mansfield Street, Glasgow

The following article entitled 'Ghost is no joke for the Hanlons' was published in the Glasgow Evening Times on 7 August 1961.

“We’ll never go near it again”

A shaken, sleepless man sat resting in his mother’s home to-day while six miles away a whole street argued furiously about the ghost he left behind him. Read More »

Marymass

3rd or 4th Monday in August - Once said to have been celebrated with hilltop fires, the festival is now associated with Mary Queen of Scots. A Queen is voted from the local Irvine girls and a parade goes through the town along with other events.

Netta Fornario: Iona's Occult Mystery

Iona 1

Iona is a small island off the West coast of Scotland with a long religious and mystical history. In the late 1920s it was the scene of the mysterious death of Netta Fornario. Her motives and the manner of her passing have been the subject of much debate over the years. Read More »

Portencross

Porton Cross

The castle at Portencross dates to the 14th Century and is thought to have been used by the Scottish Kings as a halfway house between Dundonald and Rothsay. There is a story that Robert the Bruce stayed here. Read More »

Prestwick Area

The area around Prestwick has been the focus of a number of UFO sightings.  Triangular shaped craft were seen by numerous witnesses during 1997, and several sightings were reported to the Air Traffic Read More »

Robert Burns and Folklore

Robert Burns

Robert Burns was born on the 25th January 1759 during the ‘Age of Enlightenment’ but also in a time when the country superstitions and supernatural beings were an integral part of folk belief. The landscape of Burns’ was one where the natural rhythms of nature were much more intertwined in the day to day of working life. Read More »

Stevenston’s Legend of the Hidden Gold

After the routing of the Spanish Armada in 1588, many of the Spanish Galleons escaped and tried to find North West passage through the North Sea: around the tip of Scotland and back to Spain. Read More »

Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow

The New Stobhill Hospital opened in 2009 replacing the pre existing Stobhill Hospital. This older hospital dated back to 15 September 1904, when it was officially opened as a Poor Law Hospital. Read More »

Strachur Manse

In his 1897 book entitled ‘The Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain’, John Ingram gives the story of a haunt like experience at the Manse in Strachur. Read More »

Sundrum Castle

The castle is said to be the haunt of a Green Lady, a common legend in castles throughout Scotland. Read More »

The Applebank Inn, Millheugh

The Applebank Inn dates from around 1714 and is said to be haunted a ghost associated with a stone door lintel. The lintel originally came from Broomhill House, home of the local laird, Captain McNeil, which fell into disrepair and or was burned to the ground. Captain McNeil was a seafarer who had travelled to many exotic places and had returned with an Indian princess as a bride. Read More »

The Coylet Inn, Loch Eck

Standing on the bank of the seven mile long Loch Eck (and previously known as the Lock Eck Inn), The Coylet Inn is an old coaching house dating from 1650 that originally catered for travelers going between Glasgow and Dunoon. The Inn is reputedly haunted by the apparition of a ‘Blue Boy’. Read More »

The Fairies' Hill

According to Lord Archibald Campbell in his 'Waifs and Strays of Celtic Tradition, Argyllshire Series, vol. 1 (1889); There is a green hill above Kintraw, known as the Fairies' Hill, of which the following story is told. Read More »

The Granny Stane

The squat black rock, which sits in the river Irvine below the modern Rivergate shopping centre, is once thought to have belonged to a stone circle. Read More »

The Mermaid Of Knockdolion

'THE old house of Knockdolion stood near the water of Girvan, with a black stone at the end of it. A mermaid used to come from the water at night, and taking her seat upon this stone, would sing for hours, at the same time combing her long yellow hair. Read More »

Western Infirmary, Glasgow

The Western Infirmary is a teaching hospital in Glasgow. Mark Gould gives the following account there of a haunt like experience in his article entitled 'Ghosts of sisters past' which was published in The Guardian on 22 December 2004. Read More »

Whuppity Stourie

March 1 - Is Whuppity Stourie Day in Lanark, where primary children run around the church clockwise three times twirling paper balls. The original festival involved young men from neighbouring parishes and was much more violent.



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